Web Analytics
 

To lose weight, you need to understand the psychology of why you crave the wrong things

The UK’s diet industry is thriving to say the least. More than half of British adults try to lose weight by controlling their calorie intake each year. Unfortunately, losing weight is not as easy as turning down a biscuit, or opting for salad. And even those who have been successful in their dieting endeavours find it difficult to do.

So why is it that even when we have the best of intentions, dieting is so difficult? Why can’t we control those cravings?

1. Food cues

We’ve all done it: walked past a tasty-looking supermarket stand, or smelled something delicious and immediately started drooling over whatever treat is on display, regardless of calorie content or nutrition. Sensory food cues like these can be difficult to ignore and aren’t just triggered by taste or smell—advertising or brand logos can tempt us in too.

When we are hungry, the hormone gherlin stimulates the brain, which means that we notice food cues more. Researchers have also found that our brains pay more attention to cues for unhealthy foods—those which are high in sugar and fat—than healthy foods, when we are hungry. In studies where pictures of high-calorie foods were shown to participants, it was found that the cues elicited anticipatory appetite responses, such as salivation, cravings and a reported desire to eat.

All of this together means that the attention-grabbing properties of high-calorie foods are likely to present a significant challenge for individuals who are attempting to lose weight—particularly if their diet makes them feel hungry.

On a positive note, it may be possible to train ourselves to ignore tempting cues. One study has shown that participants who were taught to ignore high calorie food cues on a computer-based task consumed less snack foods than those who were trained to pay attention to them

2. Forbidden foods are more tempting

Dieting often involves “giving up” more pleasurable foods in an attempt to reduce calorie intake. But if we are asked to avoid eating a food we enjoy, researchers have found that we will crave it—and even have a greater desire to consume the forbidden item than if we had not been deprived.

In another study, frequent consumers of chocolate were asked not to eat any for a week. In this case the participants found images of chocolate and other high-calorie food items more salient—the deprivation had made them want the high calorie foods more—than the chocolate eaters who had not been deprived. In addition, when asked to taste a forbidden food, it has been found that research participants who have been deprived of it will typically consume more calories.

All of this means that even when dieters attempt to avoid foods that are pleasurable, the behavioral and cognitive response to deprivation may inadvertently be creating more temptation.

3. The “what-the-hell” effect

When trying to lose weight, choices about what to eat and when it should be eaten are usually constrained by the rules of a chosen diet plan. But rigid dieting rules are problematic, as any eating behaviour that does not rely on the physiological signals of hunger increases the risk of overeating.

Another problem with dieting rules is that only a small violation—a sneaky slice of cake, for example—is enough to derail the whole diet. Researchers call this the “what-the-hell effect”—and it has been demonstrated in a number of laboratory experiments. Studies consistently show that dieters who believe they have consumed a high-calorie snack—and so have broken the rules of their diet—will consume more calories during a later meal than those who do not think they have violated the rules.

Although in real terms eating a few extra calories is unlikely to have a major impact on a diet, such lapses can have a bigger psychological impact. Dieting “failure” is likely to trigger negative emotions such as guilt or stress, both of which are known to cause overeating.

So what can be learned from all of this? Diets which require the dieter to follow rigid rules or forbid them from consuming foods they enjoy appear to be problematic, as they paradoxically increase the risk of overeating. Instead, it may be useful for dieters to acknowledge that humans are inherently drawn to high-calorie foods and that these cues present the most temptation if we are hungry.

Rising rates of obesity mean that many more of us are turning to diets to lose weight. However, while there is no perfect diet to help us achieve our health goals, understanding how the brain works, and recognizing the psychological effects of dieting may help us regain control in the face of temptation.

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.The Conversation

Custom Search

Diet Doc Offers Comprehensive Programs to Target Sugar Addiction and its Harmful Cardiovascular Effects

Houston, TX, July 25, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — We hear tons about the role of cholesterol when it comes to heart health and weight maintenance, but many researchers are now focusing on sugar as one of, if not the main culprits as it relates to cardiovascular disease and weight gain. A study published in JAMA Internal Medicine found that throughout the course of a 15-year study, “participants who consumed 25 percent of their daily calories were more than twice as likely to die from heart disease as those whose diets included less than 10 percent added sugar.” Simply put, the odds of succumbing to heart disease complications rises with the percentage of sugar in the diet regardless of age, activity level, age. As we can see, there’s much more to worry about than cavities and weight gain, sugar can have a devastating impact on the heart.

So why can’t more people kick added sugar? In many forms, sugars are added to almost every product in the grocery store. In diet or low-calorie products, high fructose corn syrup, sucralose and other forms are even more prevalent. Sugar is highly-addictive, and since many of us don’t realize how much we are consuming from day-to-day, it can be nearly impossible to reduce our sugar intake on our own. Diet Doc, a nationally-based center for doctor-supervised weight loss provides the perfect solutions for those who are looking to lose weight, dramatically reduce their sugar intake and improve their heart health. Diet Doc offers individualized diet plans created by certified nutritionists that addresses each person’s unique needs. The programs also include prescriptions such as Low-Dose Naltrexone (LDN), which eliminates sabotaging sugar and carbohydrate cravings, making it easier to preserve cardiovascular health and promote a healthier lifestyle.

Interested in maintaining healthy heart function and losing weight? New Diet Doc patients can call or easily and effortlessly visit https://www.dietdoc.com to complete an initial comprehensive, yet simple, health questionnaire and schedule an immediate personal, no-cost consultation. Diet Doc Physicians all received specialized training in nutritional science and fast weight loss. Diet Doc reviews each patient’s health history to create a personalized diet plan geared for fast weight loss, or that addresses life-long issues causing weight loss to slow down or stop.  Nutritionists work personally with each patient and use their own algorithm to craft meal and snack plans that are compatible with each patient’s age, gender, activity level, food preferences, nutritional needs and medical conditions. They combine these state of the art diet plans with pure, prescription diet products that enable their patients to resist the temptation to reach for sugary snacks, eliminate fatigue and curb the appetite. Over 97% of Diet Doc patients report incredible weight loss results with the majority losing 20 or more pounds per month.

At Diet Doc, all patients gain unlimited access to the best minds in the business. Their staff of doctors, nurses, nutritionists and coaches are available 6 days per week to answer questions, offer suggestions, address concerns and lend their professional guidance and support. Because of this, more and more people are turning to Diet Doc for their weight management needs. Diet plans are tailored to be specific to the needs of those of any age, gender, shape or size and for those who are struggling to lose that final 10-20 pounds to those who must lose 100 pounds or more. Call today to request a private, confidential, no-cost online consultation.  

About the Company:

Diet Doc Weight Loss is the nation’s leader in medical, weight loss offering a full line of prescription medication, doctor, nurse and nutritional coaching support.  For over a decade, Diet Doc has produced a sophisticated, doctor designed weight loss program that addresses each individual specific health need to promote fast, safe and long term weight loss.   

Diet Doc Contact Information:

Providing care across the USA

Headquarters:

San Diego, CA

(800) 581-5038

[email protected]

https://www.dietdoc.com

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DietDocMedical

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DietDocMedicalWeightLoss/

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/diet-doc-weight-loss?trk=biz-brand-tree-co-logo

Attachments:

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/50c36a25-3c31-4655-99f5-cdf33235119c

Tiffany King
Diet Doc
7027487526
[email protected]

Julie Wright
Diet Doc
760-659-3980
[email protected]

Custom Search

Diet Doc Offers Comprehensive Programs to Target Sugar Addiction …

Houston, TX, July 25, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — We hear tons about the role of cholesterol when it comes to heart health and weight maintenance, but many researchers are now focusing on sugar as one of, if not the main culprits as it relates to cardiovascular disease and weight gain. A study published in JAMA Internal Medicine found that throughout the course of a 15-year study, “participants who consumed 25 percent of their daily calories were more than twice as likely to die from heart disease as those whose diets included less than 10 percent added sugar.” Simply put, the odds of succumbing to heart disease complications rises with the percentage of sugar in the diet regardless of age, activity level, age. As we can see, there’s much more to worry about than cavities and weight gain, sugar can have a devastating impact on the heart.

So why can’t more people kick added sugar? In many forms, sugars are added to almost every product in the grocery store. In diet or low-calorie products, high fructose corn syrup, sucralose and other forms are even more prevalent. Sugar is highly-addictive, and since many of us don’t realize how much we are consuming from day-to-day, it can be nearly impossible to reduce our sugar intake on our own. Diet Doc, a nationally-based center for doctor-supervised weight loss provides the perfect solutions for those who are looking to lose weight, dramatically reduce their sugar intake and improve their heart health. Diet Doc offers individualized diet plans created by certified nutritionists that addresses each person’s unique needs. The programs also include prescriptions such as Low-Dose Naltrexone (LDN), which eliminates sabotaging sugar and carbohydrate cravings, making it easier to preserve cardiovascular health and promote a healthier lifestyle.

Interested in maintaining healthy heart function and losing weight? New Diet Doc patients can call or easily and effortlessly visit https://www.dietdoc.com to complete an initial comprehensive, yet simple, health questionnaire and schedule an immediate personal, no-cost consultation. Diet Doc Physicians all received specialized training in nutritional science and fast weight loss. Diet Doc reviews each patient’s health history to create a personalized diet plan geared for fast weight loss, or that addresses life-long issues causing weight loss to slow down or stop.  Nutritionists work personally with each patient and use their own algorithm to craft meal and snack plans that are compatible with each patient’s age, gender, activity level, food preferences, nutritional needs and medical conditions. They combine these state of the art diet plans with pure, prescription diet products that enable their patients to resist the temptation to reach for sugary snacks, eliminate fatigue and curb the appetite. Over 97% of Diet Doc patients report incredible weight loss results with the majority losing 20 or more pounds per month.

At Diet Doc, all patients gain unlimited access to the best minds in the business. Their staff of doctors, nurses, nutritionists and coaches are available 6 days per week to answer questions, offer suggestions, address concerns and lend their professional guidance and support. Because of this, more and more people are turning to Diet Doc for their weight management needs. Diet plans are tailored to be specific to the needs of those of any age, gender, shape or size and for those who are struggling to lose that final 10-20 pounds to those who must lose 100 pounds or more. Call today to request a private, confidential, no-cost online consultation.  

About the Company:

Diet Doc Weight Loss is the nation’s leader in medical, weight loss offering a full line of prescription medication, doctor, nurse and nutritional coaching support.  For over a decade, Diet Doc has produced a sophisticated, doctor designed weight loss program that addresses each individual specific health need to promote fast, safe and long term weight loss.   

Diet Doc Contact Information:

Providing care across the USA

Headquarters:

San Diego, CA

(800) 581-5038

[email protected]

https://www.dietdoc.com

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DietDocMedical

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DietDocMedicalWeightLoss/

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/diet-doc-weight-loss?trk=biz-brand-tree-co-logo

Attachments:

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/50c36a25-3c31-4655-99f5-cdf33235119c

Tiffany King
Diet Doc
7027487526
[email protected]

Julie Wright
Diet Doc
760-659-3980
[email protected]

Custom Search

How long should it take to lose weight? | New York Post

We’re constantly confronted by before and after shots. People who’ve “changed their bodies in six weeks” or “got their pre-baby body back.”

But how long does it really take to lose weight? Here’s the science behind weight loss.

What to expect

If you’ve asked your doctor or trainer “how long does it take to lose weight?” you may as well have asked how long is a piece of string. There are numerous factors that affect people’s weight loss — from age, fitness and health status to lifestyle.

That said, a realistic rate of weight loss for most people is around one to two pounds a week. Weight loss can plateau and yo-yo, so there is no designated time period to ditch that extra layer of fat — despite the common 12-week challenges.

You need to continually mix it up, keep focused and set achievable short and long-term goals.

Weight loss vs. fat loss


Shutterstock

Seeing the scales flash four pounds in a week doesn’t necessarily mean all your hard work is paying off. There are three explanations for weight loss: losing body fat, losing water and losing muscle.

With a balanced diet and regular physical activity, you’ll most likely shed fat and preserve lean muscle tissue (ideal world). However, if you’re more focused on your calorie restriction or following the latest fad diet at the expense of exercise, then you’ll lose all three components, but most likely more muscle and water.

This may appear great on the scales, but the results are never long-lived. Why? If you regain the weight, more fat and less muscle is replaced. Then once you come off the diet your body thinks another famine is coming and works hard to store away whatever energy it can — most likely as fat. You are left with a body that jiggles instead of one that is toned.

Age vs. fitness age

If you’ve noticed losing weight gets tougher with age, you’re not wrong. As you get older your body loses muscle mass, which slows your base metabolic rate (the rate at which it burns calories).

But that’s not the only age that affects weight loss. Your fitness age — the number of years you’ve been physically active for — determines your base level physique and the speed at which you shed pounds.

If you’re new to training (or overweight) and start exercising three to four times a week and eating healthily, then you could lose up to four pounds a week. Alternatively, if you’ve been training three to four times a week and eating correctly for a while, you’ll probably lose weight a steadier pace.

Get a grip of your lifestyle


Shutterstock

Losing weight can be more complex than just eating healthily and exercising. If you’re struggling to shift the scales, consider the role your lifestyle plays. Are you stressed? Not getting enough sleep? Are your friends and family helping you stay on track? Or perhaps you have underlying health issues?

The conclusion

Every body is individual. Not one size fits all. You can train and eat exactly like someone else and have entirely different results.

While most experts would agree that one to two pounds a week is realistic, the truth of the matter is that slow and steady wins the race.

Not the message you really want to hear, I know.

Kathleen Alleaume is a nutritionist, exercise physiologist and author of “What’s Eating You?

Lower high cholesterol with Nordic diet – high in nuts and fish …

Nuts, game, poultry and fish are also included, as well as whole grains, rapeseed oil and low-fat dairy products.

The rest of the group ate butter instead of rapeseed oil, fewer berries and vegetables, and had no rules on red meat or white bread intake.

The Mediterrranean diet – which is rich in fish, olive oil and vegetables, has previously been considered to help people reduce the risk of dementia.

The study, published in the Journal of Internal Medicine, said: “Healthy Nordic diet improved lipid profile and had a beneficial effect on low-grade inflammation.”

The main factors associated with raised cholesterol levels are inherited genes, age and lifestyle – especially your diet, alcohol intake and physical activity levels.

Local mother and son selected as July’s “Face of ABLE”

Bridget Hawk can’t forget all the obstacles her son Shaun had to overcome.

“They said, ‘he’ll never walk.’ ‘He’ll never talk.’ Then they said he’d never drive and before that, he wouldn’t make it through the night,” said Hawk of Shaun, a rising sophomore at the University of North Florida, majoring in computer programming.

Hawk directs the Leon County branch of Special Olympics, an international organization providing athletics training and competition for children and adults with intellectual disabilities. She has held the executive position since Jan. 1 but has worked with the organization for four years. 

When she and her family first moved to Tallahassee from New Jersey, they were looking for opportunities to get her son — who has cerebral palsy — involved in athletics. To qualify for Special Olympics, athletes must have an intellectual disability or an IQ under 60. Her son did not qualify but was unable to participate in team sports at school; instead, he joined as a unified partner, who plays alongside the athletes with intellectual disabilities.

 

Hawk said participation is Special Olympics gives athletes a new perspective on life, and also builds character and self-esteem. It even changes the way their caregivers or guardians view them. “People look at them as children…it is disrespectful to say a man of 45 is a kid.” 

On the court, no matter young or old, all unified partners and athletes are equals. The program caters to every taste with over 60 options of sports. She said, “Athletics brings people together on a level of sportsmanship and interest.” 

According to Hawk, many people with intellectual disabilities are also overweight — Special Olympics not only provides a forum for exercise but also invites medical professionals to complete regular check-ups and issue diet plans. 

Hawk’s work has also been recognized by ABLE United, a state savings program established in 2016. Both she and Shaun have been selected as July’s “Face of ABLE” to recognize those who help provide individuals with disabilities with the independence they need to achieve a better life experience.

The program allows individuals with disabilities to save up to $14,000 annually without exempting them from social security and Medicaid benefits. In non-ABLE accounts, individuals can only save up to $2,000 before disqualification for government benefits. 

Programs like ABLE and Special Olympics not only change the lives of the athletes themselves, but everyone else involved as well. Hawk credits ABLE with giving her family peace of mind and economic stability.

As for Special Olympics, every family member is either a coach, who trains a team, unified player or volunteer. “It has opened our eyes to the abilities of others…they can do it. I see it firsthand. I’ve become more respectful and openminded,” said Hawk. 

Special Olympics is supported by community donations and volunteering. Donate here and learn more about volunteering here. Interested athletes can click here for more information. 

Contact Annie Cheng at [email protected] and on Twitter @anniefcheng. 

 

 

 

Facebook Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com