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Healthy diet news 2015: Food labels to carry details on ‘added sugar’

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has proposed that all food labels must carry information on the amount of sugar present in every food item as well as information on what those sugar levels mean.

The agency’s proposal, which was announced on Friday, is meant to “supplement” a rule that was proposed by the agency last March stating that food companies should disclose added sugars on labels.

The newly proposed rule requires that an accepted level of added sugar consumption, which is not exceeding 200 calories per day, be stated on the labes of packaged food items and beverages.

The purpose of having the detailed label is not just to show consumers the amount of sugar present in the food, but also inform how such sugar levels compare with the recommended daily limit on sugar, TIME reported.

The current recommendation is that people should not exceed consumption of 10 percent of daily added sugar in their diets.

The FDA also proposed changing the footnote found on the current Nutrition Facts label to provide better understanding on what percent daily value means.

The proposed label would carry a statement in the footnote that reads: “*The percent daily value (%DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a serving of food contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice,” as stated in the official announcement from the agency.

The FDA proposal will still welcome public opinion for 75 days and may go through revisions before it becomes a formal rule.

According to the Wall Street Journal, sugar is one major food component that has not been given a “recommended consumption level” because FDA had not specified a limit.

The new proposal is a move supported by health advocates for a long time, but is opposed by several beverage and food companies.

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Better approach for losing weight

Jay Berkenbilt used to hit the gym five times a week, lifting weights and doing cardio. Yet he was still overweight and suffering from high cholesterol and blood sugar.

“It was very frustrating. I’m too young to be having these problems,” Berkenbilt said.

There’s a lot of people like Jay—running, biking, buying gym memberships at expensive fitness studios.

But experts say—if their goal is to shed pounds—all that exercise might not be helping, and could even cause weight gain.

“The problem is people look at exercise as a license to eat,” said Todd Miller, nutrition and exercise science professor.

Miller says exercise stimulates hunger, so people will eat more—and usually too much—after a workout. To make things worse, most underestimate the number of calories they’re burning.

“Most people don’t like to get on a treadmill and run for an hour and only burn 400 calories,” Miller said.

“When it comes to weight loss, I think it’s probably 75 percent diet and 25 percent exercise,” Judy Caplan, registered dietitian said.

Caplan hears much the same thing from her clients.

“When I really look at it, they’re eating way more than they think—they’re drinking way more than they thing, they really don’t have a realistic view of what’s going on in their life,” she said.

Berkenbilt learned he was eating too much. Caplan adjusted his diet, adding foods that made him feel full and cutting out anything he didn’t need.

“I did start to lose weight and that was sort of astonishing to me because I tried so many things over time,” Berkenbilt said.

Seventy-five pounds later, he says he’s feeling better than ever, sticking to his diet plan and now working out with a personal trainer.

After you lose weight, exercise becomes important for keeping it off.

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Why the most popular rule of weight loss is completely wrong


The mathematics of weight loss aren’t that simple. (Chris Radburn/AP Photo)

There’s a popular rule you’ve probably heard before about losing weight: for every 3,500 calories you shed from your diet, you’ll lose a pound. But just because everyone, including nutritionists with graduate degrees, keep repeating this doesn’t make it true.

In fact, it’s a total myth.

“I see dietitians using it all the time, making recommendations based off of it,” said Kevin Hall, who is a researcher at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. “Unfortunately it’s completely wrong.”

The adage dates back to the 1950s, when medical researcher Max Wishnofsky measured how much energy a pound of fat tissue represents, and found that it was 3,500 kilocalorie, otherwise known as calories. Theoretically, he had calculated how many calories a person had to burn—or forego—in order to lose a pound of fat. But Wishnofsky made a couple spurious assumptions.

First, he assumed that when you lose weight you only lose fat tissue. “That isn’t true,” said Hall. “It’s a relatively minor error, because a lot of it is fat tissue, but it still isn’t true.” 

The much bigger mistake Wishnofsky made was misunderstanding how our bodies react to weight loss. As soon as we start cutting calories from our diet, the number of calories our body expends begins to fall. “It literally starts happening on the first day,” said Hall. “And it continues to mount as you lose weight.”

The reason Wishnofsky, and so many others since, have botched this biological fact is that it’s fairly counterintuitive. The tendency is to assume that as you lose weight, the same calorie cut back should prove even more effective once you are lighter, and, presumably, in need of less food. At the very least, it should continue to produce the same results as it was when you were heavier. So cut 500 calories per day, and drag it out for a week, and you’ll be roughly one pound lighter; double the decrease, and you’ll drop two pounds; triple it, and do away with three. But the reality is much harder for people trying to lose weight. In fact, the further progress you make, the tougher it gets.

“Over time, the more weight you lose, the more your metabolic rate drops,” explained John Peters, a leading researcher at the Anschutz Health and Wellness Center at the University of Colorado. “In order to keep losing weight at the rate you started losing weight, you’re going to have to eat even fewer calories. A month in, you might have to eat another hundred fewer; a month after that you might have to drop it another hundred.”

Hall has, in many ways, spearheaded the movement to shed the nutrition world of the 3,500 calorie rule. In 2011, he created a model, called the Body Weight Planner, that directly challenged the adage. Drawing from a vast pool of data, the tool approximated metabolic changes in people trying to lose weight, and showed how greatly the 3,500 calorie rule overestimates weight loss.

“What we found when we made the comparison between the 3,500 calorie rule and our revised prediction is that it over predicts how much people will lose by a sizable margin,” said Hall. “If you’re just looking at diet changes alone it’s about two fold greater a year.”

The disappointing reality dieters face is that our bodies work tirelessly to defend our weight, even when that weight isn’t ideal. The metabolic changes are actually only one of three biological adjustments that follow severe cuts in calories—there are neurological and hormonal changes that happen too, both of which make losing weight and keeping it off a significant challenge. In fact, it can be nearly impossible. For these reasons some researchers say diets don’t actually work.

Hall prefers to say that losing weight is difficult. Most people who try to lose weight, he says, end up back to where they started in less than a year. But he blames popular but misleading rules for the long-term failure of so many diets.

“People don’t have the time or energy or know-how to sift through myths like the 3,500 calorie rule,” said Hall. “So they believe them, and tailor their behavior to them.”

It’s hard enough to tell tell fact from fiction in the nutrition world, where popular fads often speak louder than science. But it’s nearly impossible when the same lie is printed in practically every nutrition textbook.

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Why the most popular rule of weight loss is completely wrong


The mathematics of weight loss aren’t that simple. (Chris Radburn/AP Photo)

There’s a popular rule you’ve probably heard before about losing weight: for every 3,500 calories you shed from your diet, you’ll lose a pound. But just because everyone, including nutritionists with graduate degrees, keep repeating this doesn’t make it true.

In fact, it’s a total myth.

“I see dietitians using it all the time, making recommendations based off of it,” said Kevin Hall, who is a researcher at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. “Unfortunately it’s completely wrong.”

The adage dates back to the 1950s, when medical researcher Max Wishnofsky measured how much energy a pound of fat tissue represents, and found that it was 3,500 kilocalorie, otherwise known as calories. Theoretically, he had calculated how many calories a person had to burn—or forego—in order to lose a pound of fat. But Wishnofsky made a couple spurious assumptions.

First, he assumed that when you lose weight you only lose fat tissue. “That isn’t true,” said Hall. “It’s a relatively minor error, because a lot of it is fat tissue, but it still isn’t true.” 

The much bigger mistake Wishnofsky made was misunderstanding how our bodies react to weight loss. As soon as we start cutting calories from our diet, the number of calories our body expends begins to fall. “It literally starts happening on the first day,” said Hall. “And it continues to mount as you lose weight.”

The reason Wishnofsky, and so many others since, have botched this biological fact is that it’s fairly counterintuitive. The tendency is to assume that as you lose weight, the same calorie cut back should prove even more effective once you are lighter, and, presumably, in need of less food. At the very least, it should continue to produce the same results as it was when you were heavier. So cut 500 calories per day, and drag it out for a week, and you’ll be roughly one pound lighter; double the decrease, and you’ll drop two pounds; triple it, and do away with three. But the reality is much harder for people trying to lose weight. In fact, the further progress you make, the tougher it gets.

“Over time, the more weight you lose, the more your metabolic rate drops,” explained John Peters, a leading researcher at the Anschutz Health and Wellness Center at the University of Colorado. “In order to keep losing weight at the rate you started losing weight, you’re going to have to eat even fewer calories. A month in, you might have to eat another hundred fewer; a month after that you might have to drop it another hundred.”

Hall has, in many ways, spearheaded the movement to shed the nutrition world of the 3,500 calorie rule. In 2011, he created a model, called the Body Weight Planner, that directly challenged the adage. Drawing from a vast pool of data, the tool approximated metabolic changes in people trying to lose weight, and showed how greatly the 3,500 calorie rule overestimates weight loss.

“What we found when we made the comparison between the 3,500 calorie rule and our revised prediction is that it over predicts how much people will lose by a sizable margin,” said Hall. “If you’re just looking at diet changes alone it’s about two fold greater a year.”

The disappointing reality dieters face is that our bodies work tirelessly to defend our weight, even when that weight isn’t ideal. The metabolic changes are actually only one of three biological adjustments that follow severe cuts in calories—there are neurological and hormonal changes that happen too, both of which make losing weight and keeping it off a significant challenge. In fact, it can be nearly impossible. For these reasons some researchers say diets don’t actually work.

Hall prefers to say that losing weight is difficult. Most people who try to lose weight, he says, end up back to where they started in less than a year. But he blames popular but misleading rules for the long-term failure of so many diets.

“People don’t have the time or energy or know-how to sift through myths like the 3,500 calorie rule,” said Hall. “So they believe them, and tailor their behavior to them.”

It’s hard enough to tell tell fact from fiction in the nutrition world, where popular fads often speak louder than science. But it’s nearly impossible when the same lie is printed in practically every nutrition textbook.

Maternal diet high in fat can change newborn heart ‘tastebuds’

NEW SOUTH WALES, Australia, July 28 (UPI) — Mothers with high-fat diets during pregnancy can cause changes in heart taste receptors, according to a study with rats.

Tastebuds exist outside of the mouth, including in the heart, and although researchers are unsure exactly what their purpose is, it is thought they play a role in nutrient detection and regulation of appetite.

Researchers in the study, published in Nutrition, Metabolism, and Cardiovascular Diseases, fed rats a high-fat diet that included pies, cakes, biscuits and dim sims for 6 weeks before mating, as well as throughout gestation and lactation. At 19 weeks, the researchers found fewer bitter taste receptors on the hearts of the rats born to obese mothers, as opposed to those that had been fed regular rat feed.

Researchers said the baby rats hearts also were larger, with fewer angiotensin II and beta-adrenoreceptors, both of which are important for regulating blood pressure and cardiac activity, which suggests that their cardiac systems were overactive.

“We know that a range of maternal factors including diet can influence fetal development, but this is the first study to examine changes in the expression of taste receptors in the heart,” said Margaret Morris, head of the pharmacology department at the University of New South Wales, in a press release. “This may be an important finding linking taste preferences or nutrient availability and cardiovascular health.”

To your health: How healthy, effective are shake and juice diets? – Wilkes Barre Times

Alfred Casale To Your Health

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Whether you worked hard to build a healthy and fit summer body or if it’s still a work in progress, you may be struggling with how to maintain or lose some weight between summer barbecues and parties. That desire may have you reaching for a meal replacement shake diet or juice cleanse.

You’re constantly seeing people post incredible before and after photos on social media sites and seeing infomercials touting how great these products are. But you may be wondering how healthy, effective and sustainable are they?

The ideal way to lose weight or maintain a healthy weight is through a balanced diet that is low in fat and high in fruits, vegetables and lean protein. Whole foods typically provide a much better balance of nutrients than meal replacement shakes.

In addition, eating whole, real foods pushes you to make healthy choices that can help you maintain your weight loss in the long run. However, shake diets, or meal replacements, can be rather useful for jump starting weight loss.

The way most shake diets work is that they help you control how many calories you consume at mealtime. And burning more calories than you take it results in weight loss. Meal replacement shakes can also be more convenient and, in some cases, more cost effective than trips to the produce aisle and butcher in the grocery store.

Diet shake programs can also be good for people who consistently skip a certain meal, particularly breakfast.

Skipping meals, especially breakfast, can hinder your weight loss journey – skipping just one meal causes your blood-sugar level to take a nose dive, making you feel tired and unwell. Without a new supply of calories, your body shifts into starvation mode to conserve energy, which slows down your metabolism. When you do eventually eat, your body won’t burn the food off as efficiently and will likely store it as fat for energy.

While some diet programs’ shakes are fortified with a variety of vitamins and minerals, they typically don’t contain all of the nutritional components that whole foods provide.

Real foods provide you with antioxidants, vitamins and minerals that just aren’t in meal replacement shakes. If you do use one of these diet programs, supplement each meal you replace with a nutrient-packed, low calorie snack such as fruit, vegetables and whole grains.

Only sipping on meal replacement shakes is not a sustainable weight-loss strategy, either.

Replacing a few meals with shakes can help you drop a few pounds in the short term, but you can gain that weight right back if you stop the shakes and return to your previous diet. Make your program last by including regular physical activity and eating healthy, balanced meals throughout the day to support your shakes.

When picking out a shake, just like with other foods, it’s important to read its ingredients and nutrition label – the best option will keep added sugar and fat to a minimum while containing enough calories to keep you feeling full for several hours. Look for shakes that are high in protein and fiber.

And when it comes to juice cleanses, you’re better off eating whole, raw fruits and vegetables.

Juice cleanses can only help you lose weight in the short term because they’re low in calories. However, they severely constrict your calorie intake without providing you with necessary dietary fiber or protein. You’ll likely gain back any weight you lost once you complete your juice cleanse. Plus, you don’t need these juices to “cleanse” or “detoxify” your system – your kidneys and liver already do this for you.

By Alfred Casale

To Your Health

Dr. Alfred Casale is chairman of surgery for the Geisinger Heart Institute, co-director of the Cardiovascular Service Line for the Geisinger Health System and Associate Chief Medical Officer for the Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center. Readers may write to him via [email protected]

timesleader

Dr. Alfred Casale is chairman of surgery for the Geisinger Heart Institute, co-director of the Cardiovascular Service Line for the Geisinger Health System and Associate Chief Medical Officer for the Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center. Readers may write to him via [email protected]

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