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Urine test can detect a person’s healthy diet: Study – Bel Marra Health

By: Devon Andre | Bladder | Friday, January 20, 2017 – 08:00 AM


urine-test-and-healthy-dietA new urine test is being developed by researchers from Imperial College London, Newcastle University, and Aberystwyth University that has the ability to detect how healthy a patient’s diet truly is. The five minute test evaluates biological indicators in an individual’s urine sample that are created by the breakdown of specific foods. It is able to detect the amount of red meat, chicken, fish, fruits, and vegetables a person has eaten, and can even inform physicians of how much sugar, protein, fiber, and fat their patient has consumed.

To develop the test, researchers assigned 19 participants to four different diets, ranging from extremely healthy to extremely unhealthy based on guidelines created by the World Health Organization. The participants ate according to these diets for three days while under observation in a research facility, and provided urine samples every morning, afternoon, and evening to be analyzed by the research team. The data collected allowed them to create specific profiles outlining which metabolites were characteristic of healthy diets and which were consistent of unhealthy ones.

The goal of the test is to compare the metabolite profile of a patient’s urine sample with the established profile consistent with a healthy diet in order to determine how well they’ve been eating. The test has many practical applications in the world of medicine, as a common limitation of nutrition studies is that they rely on self-reporting of daily food intake by participants, which may not be completely accurate.

Professor Gary Frost of Imperial College London addressed this, stating, “We rely solely on people keeping logs of their daily diets – but studies suggest around 60 percent of people misreport what they eat to some extent. This test could be the first independent indicator of the quality of a person’s diet – and what they are really eating.”

The test could be extremely useful for nutritionists and physicians alike, as it gives an empirical representation of the quality of a person’s diet that cannot be influenced by false reporting. The tool would allow dieticians to suggest changes and provide accountability for clients trying to lose weight, as well as allow physicians to track how dietary changes affect patients with diabetes and other issues that can be influenced by dietary changes.

Related: What your urine color and urine odor say about your health


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Sources:

http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/newsandeventspggrp/imperialcollege/newssummary/news_13-1-2017-9-30-34

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Villages couple to present program on healthful diet changes … – Villages

Villagers Gabe and Diana Mirkin will present a program on healthful dietary changes at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 24 as part of the Winter Health Series at the Summerhill Worship Center at New Covenant United Methodist Church at 3471 Woodridge Drive in The Villages.

Diana and Gabe Mirkin on their Ti Trike.

Diana and Gabe Mirkin on their Ti Trike.

The Mirkins will provide a detailed description on how to use the latest scientific information to reduce your chances of suffering overweight, heart attacks, diabetes and cancers.

Dr. Mirkin is a sports medicine doctor, fitness guru, and long-time radio host. A practicing physician for more than 50 years, he is a graduate of Harvard University and Baylor University College of Medicine. He is one of very few doctors board-certified in four specialties:  sports medicine, allergy and immunology, pediatrics, and pediatric immunology.

Dr. Mirkin’s wife, Diana, directed his Healthy Cooking School from 1995 to 2008. She has taught thousands of people how to make healthful foods taste delicious. She is his co-author of The Healthy Heart Miracle, The Whole Grains Cookbook, The 20/30 Fat and Fiber Diet Plan, and Fat Free, Flavor Full. She has developed hundreds of recipes that follow his  guidelines for healthy eating, featuring whole grains, beans, vegetables, and fruit.

The church’s Congregational Health Team from the Lake Deaton and Summerhill campuses welcome all Villagers and surrounding community residents to the “Living Well” series.  

No reservations are necessary.  Any questions may be directed to the church’s Care Office at 352-750-4529.  Local school athletes and other youth are welcome to attend.

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How Becoming Die-Hard Paleo Backfired on My Body

Jodie, the author, showing some remarkable cheer despite being in the hospital
I fell for the natural living movement hook, line, and sinker. In the span of a few weeks, I ditched all my harsh chemical cleaners and toiletries, I started reading every label in the grocery store to make sure I avoided food additives and dyes, and I started learning how to can my own tomatoes for sauce. But all of my dedication to natural living didn’t transform me into a picture of health—in fact, it landed me in the hospital.

It’s not surprising that I was drawn in by the natural living movement’s promises of better health and wellness. A few years ago, I was diagnosed with mitochondrial disease, a progressive genetic disease with no treatment or cure. Doctors focused on treating my symptoms, but they acknowledged there was nothing they could do to stop me from getting sicker. My future suddenly felt limited in a way I’d never imagined.

In my desperate search for a treatment, I stumbled across the Paleo diet. I read Paleo blog after Paleo blog, and all of them assured me that anything could be cured by the right combination of food, supplements, and natural living. Food could be my medicine, they said, and with no other hope, I threw myself into transforming my lifestyle. I ditched processed foods and carbs, bought an essential oil diffuser, and started doing yoga. I was so enthusiastic about my lifestyle change that I even began my own Paleo blog to chronicle my journey to good health. 



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At first, it seemed like everything I’d read was true. Following a Paleo diet helped me lose weight almost immediately; it also cured my constant acid reflux and improved my migraines. I looked and felt better, and I couldn’t stop singing its praises. Flush with my success, I went to my doctors and asked them whether I really needed all of the medications they had me on. They only offered symptom relief, and I was convinced that through time the healthy food I was eating would make everything better. With my doctors’ blessing, I ditched all of my medications and focused on my new natural lifestyle.

It took me a long time to notice that I was weaker and had less energy while eating Paleo, and even longer to admit it to myself. When I mentioned it to other people following the diet, they told me that I just needed to go even more hardcore Paleo and remove even more foods from my diet. I gave up everything from eggs to nuts to tomatoes, but my energy levels didn’t improve. After about six months, things got so bad that my doctors ordered infusions at the hospital. I lay in a chair twice a week hooked up to an IV just to have enough energy to go to the grocery store. I was preparing all my meals from scratch, spending an hour or more in the kitchen each day, and I had no energy left for anything else. My life became small and limited. 

I lost a lot of weight eating Paleo. I dropped three pants sizes, and people often told me how great I looked. But I was pale, even for me, and I always had deep, black circles under my eyes. I didn’t look like any of the Paleo bloggers on Instagram who wrote about their own health transformations, and as time went on, I looked worse, not better. Nothing about me felt healthy, and every day it seemed like my pain levels increased. My feet felt like they were being electrocuted, and my muscles ached so deeply that it felt like the pain was in my bones. No matter what I did, the pain was there, but I still didn’t quit. If natural living couldn’t cure me, what other options did I have?

I didn’t give up on the promises of natural living easily. I kept eating Paleo, relying on essential oils and mindfulness for pain relief, until my IV infusions took their toll; after a few months, all of my veins were scarred and blown. The nurses started talking about a central line… which came with the risk of infections that could kill me. And that’s when I called it quits. 

I’d embraced a natural lifestyle for health reasons, and I ditched it for health reasons too. I decided to see what medication and a steady dose of carbs throughout the day could do for me before I seriously considered a central line. I stopped spending hours on food shopping and preparation, and I even gave up worrying about every little ingredient in my food. I went back to premade sauces and simple meals, and I put my canning pot in the garage. I ate high-fructose corn syrup sometimes, and I stopped sweating every GMO in my tortillas.

I’d embraced a natural lifestyle for health reasons, and I ditched it for health reasons too.

There’s something to be said for choosing mostly whole foods. I still don’t eat most grains or dairy because they upset my stomach and give me migraines. I diffuse essential oils when my kids have a cold or cough, and I drop garlic oil in their ears when they get ear infections. Some aspects of natural living have been helpful for me, but it’s not a cure for everything, and that line of thinking is where I went wrong initially.

Eating too much of the wrong foods can cause health problems, but that doesn’t mean the opposite is true. There’s no such thing as a food cure, and not everyone can be healthy. My genes can’t be changed by cold-pressed juice and coconut oil, but my desperation made me an easy target for natural-living enthusiasts looking to sell books, supplements, and oils. 

My story doesn’t have a happy ending, because that’s not how genetic diseases work. I won’t be cured by medicine or food, but I’m no longer in pain all day, because the prescription medications I take (the ones developed by Big Pharma) relieve my pain. I am happier and more independent because I’m in less pain, and I have more time now to focus on the things I love instead of wasting my energy in the kitchen. Ditching the natural living movement got me off the infusions and gave me my life back.

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100 Weight Loss Bowls: Build your own calorie-controlled diet plan with these recipes

If you are on the hunt for light and healthy meals, 100 Weight Loss Bowls will help you create tasty meals that are low in calories and high in flavour.

The book is packed with recipe ideas under 400 calories as well as other option that are less than 500 or 600 calories.

Written by food writer Heather Whinney, it features smoothies, power bowls and on-the-go sushi dishes.

Its main aim is to help you build your own calorie controlled diet plan – that works around you.

The first page of the book reads: “Eating from a bowl is the simple way to enjoy delicious, complete meals while controlling the amount of calories you take in.”

Try these three tasty recipes from the book and see how you get on creating your healthy bowls that suit you.

100 Weight Loss Bowls is priced at £12.99 and is available to buy here.

Corn and red pepper fritters with avocado and dates

Sweet corn red pepper fritters with tomatoes, avocado, dates

Under 600 calories

Prep time: 15 minutes

Cooking time: 10 minutes

Ingredients:

2 tbsp sweetcorn

60g red pepper, finely chopped

2 tbsp buckwheat flour, or other gluten-free flour

pinch of chilli flakes

a few coriander leaves, finely chopped

1 egg, lightly beaten

1 tbsp almond milk

sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

2 tomatoes

1 tbsp olive oil

½ avocado

2 dates, pitted, and sliced

handful of flat-leaf parsley (optional)

lime wedges (optional)

Method:

  1. Make the fritters by mixing the sweetcorn, red pepper, buckwheat flour, chili flakes, coriander leaves, egg, and almond milk in a bowl. Season with salt and pepper and set aside.
  2. Cut a cross on the base of each tomato and put into a bowl of boiling water for 20 seconds. Transfer to a bowl of cold water, slip off and discard their skins, roughly chop them, and setaside.
  3. Heat the olive oil in a non-stick frying pan over a medium heat, swirling it to coat the pan.
  4. Add 1 tablespoon of the batter to the pan, then repeat to make 4 fritters, leaving a little space between each. Leave them undisturbed for 3 minutes or until the underside starts to turn golden brown.
  5. Use a spatula to carefully turn them, cooking the other side for the same time, or until golden brown.
  6. Transfer the fritters to a serving bowl, then add the tomatoes. Peel, chop, and add the avocado, then the dates. Sprinkle with the parsley and finish with lime wedges to squeeze over (if using).

How to build your bowl:

  1. Start with sweetcorn and red pepper fritter
  2. Add in tomatoes, avocado, and dates
  3. Finish with flat-leaf parsley and lime wedges

Chicken and black-eyed beans with spicy yoghurt dressing

Under 400 calories

Prep time: 15 minutes

Cooking time: None

Ingredients:

165g cooked black-eyed beans

finely grated zest of 1 lemon

½ chilli, finely chopped

pinch of cumin seeds, crushed

sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

¼ red pepper, finely chopped

1 tomato, halved, seeds removed, and flesh finely chopped

1 celery stalk, finely chopped

¼ red onion, finely sliced

1 tbsp pomegranate seeds

pinch of sumac

a few coriander leaves

125g cooked skinless chicken breast, sliced

4 Baby Gem lettuce leaves

finely grated lime zest, to serve (optional)

Method:

  1. Mix the black-eyed beans, lemon zest, chili, and cumin seeds in a bowl, and season with salt and pepper. Stir in the red pepper, tomato, and celery, then check the seasoning, adding more as needed.
  2. Now mix the red onion, pomegranate seeds, sumac, and coriander leaves in another bowl,seasoning with salt and pepper to taste.
  3. Make the dressing by mixing the Greek yogurt and hot sauce in a bowl. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
  4. Put the black-eyed beans mixture and the chicken in a serving bowl, then add the Baby Gemlettuce.
  5. Spoon on the red onion mixture and spicy yogurt dressing and scatter over the lime zest (if using).

How to build your bowl:

  1. Start with black-eyed beans mixture and chicken
  2. Add in Baby Gem lettuce
  3. Finish with red onion mixture, spicy yogurt dressing, and lime zest

Turkey and mango with corn and avocado salsa

Under 600 calories

Prep time: 15 minutes

Cooking time: 10 minutes

Ingredients:

125g turkey breast

1 tsp olive oil

sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

140g courgette, peeled into ribbons with a vegetable peeler

½ avocado

juice of 1 lemon

55g sweetcorn

150g cooked spelt, quinoa, red rice, and wild rice mix, or other cooked grain mix

55g (2oz) mango, chopped

a few coriander leaves

¼ red chili, sliced (optional)

lime wedge (optional)

For the dressing:

1 tsp extra virgin olive oil

¼ tsp white wine vinegar

2 tsp 0% fat Greek yogurt

handful of coriander leaves, finely chopped

Method:

  1. Coat the turkey breast with 1⁄2 tsp of the olive oil, and rub with salt and pepper.
  2. Heat a griddle pan over a high heat, then toss the courgette with the remaining ½ tsp of olive oil and some salt and pepper. Put the courgette in the pan, cook for 1 minute on each side, then remove from the pan, and set aside.
  3. Clean and reheat the griddle pan, then add the turkey to the hot pan, and cook for 3–4 minutes on each side or until cooked through. Allow to rest for 5 minutes.
  4. Make the dressing by mixing the extra virgin olive oil, white wine vinegar, Greek yogurt, and coriander leaves in a bowl, then season with salt and pepper.
  5. Chop the avocado and toss in another bowl with the lemon juice to prevent discoloration,then add the sweetcorn and season with salt and pepper.
  6. Slice the turkey into strips and place in a serving bowl, then add the courgette, sweetcorn mixture, spelt mix, and mango. Spoon on the dressing, sprinkle over the coriander leaves and red chili (if using), and add the lime wedge (if using), to squeeze over.

How to build your bowl:

  1. Start with turkey, courgette, sweetcorn mixture, spelt mix, and mango
  2. Add in yogurt dressing, coriander leaves, and red chili
  3. Finish with lime wedge

Villages couple to present program on healthful diet changes Tuesday at New Covenant – Villages

Villagers Gabe and Diana Mirkin will present a program on healthful dietary changes at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 24 as part of the Winter Health Series at the Summerhill Worship Center at New Covenant United Methodist Church at 3471 Woodridge Drive in The Villages.

Diana and Gabe Mirkin on their Ti Trike.

Diana and Gabe Mirkin on their Ti Trike.

The Mirkins will provide a detailed description on how to use the latest scientific information to reduce your chances of suffering overweight, heart attacks, diabetes and cancers.

Dr. Mirkin is a sports medicine doctor, fitness guru, and long-time radio host. A practicing physician for more than 50 years, he is a graduate of Harvard University and Baylor University College of Medicine. He is one of very few doctors board-certified in four specialties:  sports medicine, allergy and immunology, pediatrics, and pediatric immunology.

Dr. Mirkin’s wife, Diana, directed his Healthy Cooking School from 1995 to 2008. She has taught thousands of people how to make healthful foods taste delicious. She is his co-author of The Healthy Heart Miracle, The Whole Grains Cookbook, The 20/30 Fat and Fiber Diet Plan, and Fat Free, Flavor Full. She has developed hundreds of recipes that follow his  guidelines for healthy eating, featuring whole grains, beans, vegetables, and fruit.

The church’s Congregational Health Team from the Lake Deaton and Summerhill campuses welcome all Villagers and surrounding community residents to the “Living Well” series.  

No reservations are necessary.  Any questions may be directed to the church’s Care Office at 352-750-4529.  Local school athletes and other youth are welcome to attend.

6 Smart Tips: How to Lose Weight and Keep It Off

6 Smart Tips: Lose Weight and Keep It Off

As a doctor, a big part of what I do is help people lose weight. If you are overweight and need some practical advice, here are some recommendations:

1. Restrict calories in a tailored program

Not all calories, or bodies, are the same. The right diet for weight loss can be different combinations of carbohydrates, proteins and fats. In my practice, I personalize the diet, working with patients in an ongoing process and adjusting based on their personality and what is medically correct for them.

2. Realize that a restrictive diet is a temporary measure

Restricting calories is only the first step and not a permanent solution. Once you lose weight, you should switch to a more moderate calorie intake balanced with regularly scheduled exercise activity.

3. Reach out for support

Unless you function better by yourself, support is key to long-term success. Find support from peers through weight management groups and/or a workout buddy, or professional help from behavioral and life coaches, psychologists, exercise physiologists and personal trainers.

4. Remember that weight loss is also about the mind

You have to be committed to the process. Losing weight is about so much more than what we eat. It’s often about how we feel about ourselves and what triggers us to make healthy or unhealthy choices. Remembering this will allow you to indulge in actions that positively change your behavior rather than pacify them with increased calories or being sedentary. (This also helps you be kind to yourself by not underestimating the effort involved.)

5. Consider the role of medication

Working with your doctor, it may be appropriate to consider appetite suppressants, such as phentermine, qsymia or lorcaserin, medications approved by the FDA for weight loss to enhance your weight loss efforts. You will have to meet clinical standards, such as a body mass index of 27 with one or more associated diseases or a body mass index of 30 or higher, with or without co-morbid disease(s).

6. Redefine exercise

Be creative in the way you move. It doesn’t have to be in a gym or structured environment. Just move more than you do now. Frequency (how often), intensity (how hard) and time (how long) are the components that matter when attempting to lose weight and keep it off. To lose weight, the American College of Sports Medicine recommends moderate- to high-intensity exercise for 60-90 minutes, at least five days per week.

To lose weight and keep it off, look beyond the initial weight loss to a permanent change in lifestyle behaviors and know that your efforts are not in vain.

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