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The 14-day tummy flattening diet plan

Is it just us or does the battle of the bulge (and mainly, the belly bulge) always feel like an impossible one to win?

We start off with the best of intentions, reading up on the latest diet fad and excitedly spending two weeks’ worth of shopping money on one haul of must-have ‘health’ foods and gadgets. Only to quickly realise that, no, we’re not going to be able to drink nothing but a glass of juice for longer than two days and, no, we’re not so sure that taking a pill to lose weight is the answer we were looking for…

With summer just around the corner, the image of figure-hugging tops and swimsuits is looming closer, and we’re more keen than ever to make this year the year we find a healthy diet plan we can actually stick to, rather than a fad diet that will leave us feeling more gross than gorgeous.

Enter nutitionist and blogger Madeleine Shaw, and her refreshingly, well, healthy way of getting clued up on eating better and losing belly fat for good.

Madeleine is a nutritionist, blogger and all-round health buff!

Madeleine believes that by eating simple, delicious (and affordable!) food that’s good for you, your body won’t feel deprived while keeping it in tip-top condition.

Madeleine uses her healthy eating regime to targeting the side effects of IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) which means her plan is perfect for those looking for a way to debloat and a flatter tummy in no time.

Her two-week planner (which is less about dieting, and more about long-term healthy eating) avoids bloating foods such as sugar and wheat, and concentrates on bloat-free foods. The meal plan contains whole foods, healthy fats and fresh protein, to keep your energy levels up and reduce cravings for sugary food.

Sound like your kind of belly-fat-busting plan? Follow her two-week daily meal suggestions and you’ll be well on your way to beating the bulge in no time!

Madeleine’s 14-day tummy-taming diet plan

Week 1: Monday

Tuesday

Breakfast

Homemade buckwheat granola

Breakfast

Madeleine Shaw’s Spanish omlette

Lunch

Cauliflower, roasted chickpea, fennel and avocado salad

Lunch

Za’atar salmon with shaved fennel, carrot and almond salad

Dinner

Vegetarian chilli con vegetables

Dinner

Warm kale, avocado, pomegranate and quinoa salad

 

Wednesday

Thursday

Breakfast

Sprouted amaranth porridge with grilled banana

Breakfast

Poached eggs with tomato and rocket on a buckwheat pancake

Lunch

Thai coconut prawn soup with courgetti

Lunch


Creamy and comforting tomato soup

Dinner

Mexican salmon, lentil and quinoa bowl

Dinner


Sweet potato, lentil and spinach bowl

 

Friday

Saturday

Breakfast

Healthy folded eggs with asparagus and avocado puree

Breakfast

Pancakes with strawberries and coconut cream

Lunch

Brussel sprout, sweet potato and tomato salad

Lunch

Poached eggs, avocado and miso sweet corn puree

Dinner

Spinach and cashew nut roast

Dinner

Chicken, kale and sweet potato curry with cardamom cauliflower rice

 

Sunday

Week 2: Monday

Breakfast

Vegan Buckwheat waffles with Cinnamon Spiced Apple

Breakfast

Healthy folded eggs with asparagus and avocado puree

Lunch

Courgette Ribbon and Kale bowl with Miso, Chilli and Avocado Dressing

Lunch

Creamy and comforting tomato soup

Dinner

Chickpea pasta with roasted sweet potato and sage

Dinner

Warm kale, avocado, pomegranate and quinoa salad

 

Tuesday

Wednesday

Breakfast

Vegan Buckwheat waffles with Cinnamon Spiced Apple

Breakfast

Homemade buckwheat granola

Lunch

Brussel sprout, sweet potato and tomato salad

Lunch

Za’atar salmon with shaved fennel, carrot and almond salad

Dinner

Chickpea pasta with roasted sweet potato and sage

Dinner

Sweet potato, lentil and spinach bowl

 

Thursday

Friday

Breakfast

Madeleine Shaw’s Spanish omlette

Breakfast

Sprouted amaranth porridge with grilled banana

Lunch

Cauliflower, roasted chickpea, fennel and avocado salad

Lunch

Poached eggs with tomato and rocket on a buckwheat pancake

Dinner

Mexican salmon, lentil and quinoa bowl

Dinner

Chicken, kale and sweet potato curry with cardamom cauliflower rice

 

Saturday

Sunday

Breakfast

Poached eggs with tomato and rocket on a buckwheat pancake

Breakfast

Pancakes with strawberries and coconut cream

Lunch

Courgette Ribbon and Kale bowl with Miso, Chilli and Avocado Dressing

Lunch

Thai coconut prawn soup with courgetti

Dinner

Vegetarian chilli con vegetables

Dinner

Spinach and cashew nut roast

 

Madeleine Shaw is an ambassador for the Better with BRITA campaign. For more recipes, healthy tips and videos visit www.brita.co.uk/betterwithbrita

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8 Things You Should Never Eat If You’re Trying To Lose Weight

Related: The 9 Best Desserts For Weight Loss—Seriously

5. Juice

It takes several oranges to make one 6-ounce glass of OJ, but when you drink juice, you consume all the calories from those oranges without the natural fruit fibers that fill you up. It’s why “even 100 percent juice is just empty calories and another blood sugar spike,” Harvest says.

Another thing: Fructose, the natural fruit sugar that makes fruit and fruit juice taste sweet, tricks your body into gaining weight by blunting your body’s ability to recognize when it’s full, says Melissa Rifkin, a registered dietitian at Montefiore Medical Center in New York and a Rise nutrition coach. This makes you eat more, and increases your risk of developing insulin resistance and diabetes.

6. Artificially Sweetened Drinks

Goodbye, diet soda, and every other sweet-tasting drink that mysteriously contains zero calories! “There are some people whose brains are wired in a way that artificial sweeteners induce or enhance cravings,” says Dr. Seltzer. “If drinking a Diet Snapple leads you to the Ben Jerry’s, then you’d certainly be better off with water or water with lemon.” Or sparkling water: It’s calorie-free, but carbonated, which makes your stomach feel full so you end up eating less overall.

Related: There’s New Evidence That Wine Could Burn Fat

7. Cereal Sold in a Value-Size Box

The same goes for super-sized snack packages. People consume up to 22 percent more when they eat from larger packages, according to a study conducted by researchers at Cornell University’s Food and Brand Lab. When people know there is more food available, they subconsciously let themselves eat more of it. The same goes for food you buy on sale: you’re more likely to consume more when food costs less, according to anotherstudy. That’s not to say you should spend more on food to eat less overall — it’s unsustainable (and silly). If you’re going to spring for a value pack of any packaged food, measure out your serving instead of eating out of the bag so you don’t fall pray to your own mind’s games.

8. Booze

It’s almost impossible to find a weight loss expert who recommends alcohol for weight loss. (Believe me, I tried.) While some cocktails have fewer calories than others, alcohol just doesn’t support weight loss. It contains empty calories that don’t fill you up or provide any nutrients; softens your resolve so you’re more likely to overeat; and impairs your judgement, regardless of your weight loss goals. (It’s why you drunk eat pizza, not salad.) But it gets worse: “When alcohol is present in your body, it’s considered a toxin that your body wants to get rid of, and becomes you liver’s top priority,” says Dr. Caroline Cederquist, MD, creator of bistroMD. When your liver is in hardcore detox mode, it can’t burn fat as efficiently. Because that’s a major buzz kill, skip the buzz altogether if you’re serious about losing weight. Or at least cut back on the booze, big time.

By Elizabeth Narins

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Healthy diet recommended to help manage diabetes

(CNN) — Almost one in 10 Americans has a form of diabetes, and whether it’s type 1 or type 2 diabetes, there’s one thing all these people can do to help manage the disease, and that’s to eat a healthy diet.

There are some “super foods” for those who have diabetes. The American Diabetes Association recently compiled a list, and it includes beans, dark green leafy vegetables, citrus fruit, tomatoes, fish high in omega-3 fatty acids, whole grains, nuts, and fat-free milk and yogurt.

On the flip side, there are some red-flagged foods that you’ll want to steer clear of if you have diabetes.

“Carbs that are processed, so white bread, white rice, white potatoes, sugared beverages, and because people with diabetes are at increased risk of blood vessel disease, (they should be) very cautious and careful about saturated fats and trans fats,” said Dr. Laurence Sperling, preventive cardiology director at Emory University.

So if you’re diabetic and think you might need some nutritional help, what’s the next step?

“I do think seeing a nutritionist is a good idea for somebody with diabetes,” Sperling said, “but importantly, if you are on medications along with your diet, working with your doctor and your team of health professionals is a good team approach.”

The American Diabetes Association Hawaii reports that over 107,000 people here have diabetes and 390,800 are living with pre-diabetes.

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American Idol alum Justin Guarini on how he became Diet Dr. Pepper’s Lil’ Sweet

Fans of American Idol may recognize Lil’ Sweet, the zazzy littlevery littlestar of Diet Dr. Pepper’s new campaign, as season 1 runner-up Justin Guarini. But how did it all happen?

Guarini called up EW to tell the story.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: How did you get involved in this commercial?
JUSTIN GUARINI: I got this call from my agent saying Dr. Pepper was looking for someone to play a character in a commercial. I didn’t have any expectations – there was no real set character. I went in, did some kind of crazy stuff and sung a lot of the lines. They ended up saying, “We want to work with you on this.”

If there was no set character, how did Lil’ Sweet come to life?
Lil’ Sweet is a collaboration between Dr. Pepper and I. The whole thought behind him is that we wanted him to be a rock god. He’s not necessarily one person – I think he personifies an era of rock and glam. His whole thing is that he also personifies the benefits of Diet Dr. Pepper – you have all the sweetness with none of the calories. And that’s why he’s so small.

What did they do to make you that small?
All of the times that you see me were shot in a huge studio in front of a green screen. For the second commercial, because I’m supposed to be three or four feet tall and sliding down a banister, they built a huge, 20-foot – what amounts to a slide – with a platform on it that I slid up and down this “banister,” this huge rig that dwarfed me for hours and hours on end. I have to say, it was so much fun.

How do you channel someone like Lil’ Sweet before filming the commercials?
It’s really funny – it’s like, you get the concept of what he’s about, but once I put the costume on, for me, I become that person. I’m not one of those actors that walks around all day acting like Lil’ Sweet – that’d probably be pretty annoying – but I really feel like once I put the clothes on, then I’m wearing the character and I just let whatever comes out come out.

Did you do any ad-libbing, or was it all scripted?
There was a script, but “Lil’ Sweet defying gravity” was never in the script [for Lil’ Sweet ‘Birthday’]. But that’s the sort of dream job as a creative person in any field – you have your boundaries and you have your opportunities to play inside those, but then you have a wonderful creative team all thinking of funny and interesting things. That’s what really brought Lil’ Sweet to life – all of us were playing and having a great time doing it.

Have your kids seen your commercial? Do they realize it’s you?
The funny thing is, that type of humor and that type of behavior, I do it around the house all day every day. I remember saying during the shoot, “I can’t believe you guys are paying me to do this,”  because that’s the kind of stuff I do for my kids and my wife – make them laugh.

Do you get Diet Dr. Pepper for life now?
[Laughs] Yeah, I’ve got it in my will.

Will we be seeing Lil’ Sweet in any more commercials?
Of course I would love to if they offered, but for right now, I think the two that are out are wonderful, I’m proud of them and people really seem to enjoy them. So, we’ll see what happens.

7 Nutrients Vegans Need in Their Diet


From animal rights to health concerns, there are many reasons why people choose to become vegans. Vegans avoid all animal foods, including eggs, dairy and in some cases honey.

While becoming a vegan can lend itself to positive dietary changes, such as increased vegetable, fruit and whole-grain consumption, it does not necessarily make someone a “healthy” eater – sugar, fried foods, alcohol and refined starches can all be vegan! Additionally, veganism involves significant dietary restrictions, so in order to prevent deficiencies vegans must be diligent to consume plant-based sources of nutrients commonly found in animal products. In some cases, supplementation may be advised, but speak with your physician before consuming supplements. The most-common nutrients of concern are: protein, vitamin B12, iron, zinc, calcium, vitamin D and vitamin B2 (riboflavin).

Protein
Why It’s Important: Protein not only provides the building blocks of muscle and lean body mass, but is also involved in the production of hair, nails, enzymes, hormones and neurotransmitters.

How Much an Adult Needs: The Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) of protein for an average adult is 0.8 grams per kilogram of body weight. However, it can be 20 percent higher for people whose primary sources of protein are from plants – which is equal to about 1 gram per kilogram of body weight. For an average 150-pound person, that is 68 grams of protein per day. More is needed if you’re an athlete or recovering from injury.

Vegan Foods Rich in Protein (values are approximate)
• 1/2 cup tofu = 20 grams
• 3 ounces tempeh = 15 grams
• 3 ounces seitan = 18 grams
• 1 cup cooked quinoa = 8 grams
• 1/2 cup beans = 8 to 10 grams
• 1 ounce or 1/4 cup almonds = 6 grams
• 1 ounce or 1/4 cup pumpkin seeds = 9 grams

Vegan Recipe That Features Protein-Rich Foods:
Vegan Tofu Scramble

Vitamin B12
Why It’s Important: Vitamin B12 plays an essential role in red blood cell formation, proper functioning of the brain and nervous system, and metabolism. Deficiency can result in anemia, muscle weakness, numbness and loss of balance.

How Much an Adult Needs: The RDA for adults is 2.4 micrograms (mcg) per day. While the body can store vitamin B12 in the liver for years, deficiency can occur in vegetarians and vegans, as most sources of vitamin B12 are animal foods.

Vegan Foods Rich in Vitamin B12 (values are approximate):
• 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast = 2 micrograms
• Fortified almond, soy or coconut milk = 1 to 3 micrograms
• Fortified cereals = 0.6 to 6 micrograms
• 100 grams tempeh = 0.12 micrograms
• Fortified “meat” alternatives = varies

Vegan Recipes That Feature Vitamin B12-Rich Foods:
Vegan Cream of Broccoli Soup
Buff Smoothie

Iron
Why It’s Important: Iron is an essential component of the cells that accept and transfer oxygen through our body – hemoglobin in our red blood cells and myoglobin in our muscle cells. Iron is also involved in breathing, metabolism, collagen synthesis and brain function. Deficiency can result in feelings of fatigue and weakness, decreased mental performance, decreased immune function, swollen tongue and difficulty maintaining body temperature.

How Much an Adult Needs: Women need more iron (18 milligrams per day) than men (8 milligrams per day) during their menstrual years. Women have increased needs with pregnancy (27 milligrams per day) and lower needs while lactating (9 milligrams per day) and after menopause (8 milligrams per day). While plant-based sources of iron are less absorbed by the body, you can increase how much your body takes in by consuming them with a source of vitamin C. Cooking in a cast-iron skillet can actually help as well!

Vegan Foods Rich in Iron (values are approximate):
• 1 cup cooked spinach, Swiss chard and other dark leafy greens = about 6 milligrams
• 1 cup of most beans = 4 milligrams
• 1 cup lentils = 6 milligrams
• 1/2 cup tofu = 3 milligrams
• 1 cup quinoa (cooked) = 2.7 milligrams
• 2 tablespoons sesame seeds = 2.6 milligrams
• 1 ounce cashews = 2 milligrams
• 1 medium potato with skin = 2 milligrams
• 1/2 cup stewed tomatoes = 2 milligrams
• 1 cup cooked broccoli = 2 milligrams
• 1 cup green peas = 2 milligrams
• 1 cup cooked Brussels sprouts = 2 milligrams
• 2 tablespoons blackstrap molasses = 2 milligrams

Vegan Recipe That Features Iron-Rich Foods:
Vegan Lentil Burgers

Zinc
Why It’s Important: Zinc is involved in a wide range of bodily functions, primarily supporting the immune system, wound healing, cell division, cell growth and carbohydrate metabolism. Deficiency can result in delayed healing, increased infection, loss of taste or smell, decreased appetite, hair or skin problems and loss of libido in men.

How Much an Adult Needs: Adequate daily intake of zinc is important, as the body cannot store it. While adult women generally need at least 8 milligrams per day (more during pregnancy) and adult men need 11 milligrams per day, vegans may need to consume as much as 50 percent more than those amounts, since zinc from plant-based sources is not absorbed as well. While vegans are more at risk for deficiency, it is possible to consume too much zinc (more than 40 milligrams), usually due to excessive supplementation. Excess zinc intake can negatively impact copper and iron levels, impair the immune system and reduce “good” HDL cholesterol.

Vegan Foods Rich in Zinc (values are approximate):
• 1 ounce pumpkin seeds = 2.92 milligrams
• 1 cup quinoa (cooked) = 2 milligrams
• 1 ounce cashews = 1.6 milligrams
• 1/4 cup dry oatmeal = 1.5 milligrams
• 2 tablespoons sesame seeds = 1.4 milligrams
• 1/2 cup chickpeas = 1.3 milligrams
• 1 cup lentils = 1.3 milligrams
• 1 cup asparagus = 1 milligram
• 1/2 cup tofu = 1 milligram

Vegan Recipe That Features Zinc-Rich Foods:
Quinoa Salad

Calcium
Why it’s Important: While traditionally associated with strong bones and teeth (99 percent of calcium is stored there), calcium also plays major roles in blood clotting, maintaining your heartbeat, creating muscle contractions, conducting nerve signals and releasing hormones. Some examples of acute calcium deficiency are numbness/tingling in the fingers, muscle cramping, fatigue, reduced appetite, convulsions and arrhythmias. Long-term deficiency can negatively affect bone health, including osteopenia, osteoporosis and increased fracture risk.

How Much an Adult Needs: The RDA for calcium for most adults ranges from 1,000 to 1,200 milligrams per day, depending on age. Adolescents need a bit more, about 1,300 milligrams per day. Vegans who do not consume fortified products may need a calcium supplement to meet their daily needs.

Vegan Foods Rich in Calcium (values are approximate):
• 1 cup fortified non-dairy milk = 300 milligrams
• 1 cup fortified orange juice = 300 milligrams
• 1/2 cup tofu = 250 milligrams
• 10 figs = 270 milligrams
• 1 cup cooked broccoli = 180 milligrams
• 1/4 cup almonds = 95 milligrams
• 1 cup of most beans = 80 milligrams
• 1 cup sweet potato or butternut squash = 70 to 85 milligrams
• 1 cup cooked dark leafy greens (kale, bok choy, etc.) = 75 to 100 milligrams

Vitamin D
Why It’s Important: Vitamin D is involved in many systems throughout the body, including bone health, cell growth, immune function, neuromuscular function, inflammation management and cell regulation. Deficiency can result in loss of bone health, such as rickets in children and osteomalacia or osteoporosis in adults. Bone pain and muscle weakness may occur as well.

How Much an Adult Needs: The RDA for vitamin D has risen in recent years, up to 600 IU (15 micrograms) for most adults, increasing to 800 IU (20 micrograms) for adults over 70 years of age. Needs may be even higher for other populations. There are very few foods that are naturally rich in vitamin D, and even fewer for vegetarians and vegans. Adequate sunlight during the summer months is the best way to ensure ample vitamin D stores, but this can be challenging for many.

Vegan Foods Rich in Vitamin D (values are approximate):
• 1 cup fortified orange juice = about 140 IU
• Vitamin D-enriched mushrooms = varies based on what light the mushroom is exposed to
• Fortified cereal = varies

Vegan Recipe That Features Vitamin D Foods:
Spicy Vegan Sloppy Joes (Crimini mushrooms may contain small amounts of vitamin D)

Riboflavin
Why It’s Important: Riboflavin is involved in healthy growth of your skin, hair, eyes and liver. It is also involved in red blood cell production, nervous system function and carbohydrate metabolism. It’s also involved in the activation of other B vitamins, such as folate and vitamin B6.

How Much an Adult Needs: Adult women need about 1.1 milligrams per day, and adult men need about 1.3 milligrams per day. Many good sources of riboflavin are animal products like dairy, eggs, fish and meat. Therefore, vegans should make sure they are consuming at least a couple of good plant-based sources of riboflavin each day.

Vegan Food Sources of Riboflavin (values are approximate):
• 1 cup tofu or soybeans = 0.49 milligrams
• 1 cup cooked spinach, beet greens = 0.42 milligrams
• 4 ounces tempeh = 0.40 milligrams
• 1 ounces almonds = 0.29 milligrams
• 1 cup cooked asparagus = 0.25 milligrams
• 1 cup green peas = 0.21 milligrams
• 1 medium sweet potato = 0.21 milligrams
• 1 cup cooked broccoli = 0.20 milligrams
• 1 cup cooked quinoa = 0.20 milligrams
• 1 cup winter squash = 0.14 milligrams
• 1 cup Brussels sprouts = 0.12 milligrams

Through his book and blog, Death of the Diet , Jason Machowsky, MS, RD, CSCS, strongpowers people to live the life they want by integrating healthy eating and physical activity habits into their daily routines. You can follow him on Twitter @JMachowskyRDFit .

Diet Plan: 15 Foods that Fight Belly Fat

There are some foods that can help burn fat while exercising. These are said to help increase the metabolism or help the body stay fuller for a longer period of time, reports Cooking Light. Meanwhile, Elle states that some fat fighting foods can also help release hormones that rid the body of toxins, which make it difficult to burn fat. Below is a list of foods that can help burn belly fat.  

#1: Berries 

According to Cooking Light, research showed that berries contain a type of flavonoid which can increase the levels of the adiponectin hormone in the body; thereby stimulating the fat burning process. 

#2: Oatmeal 

Eating fiber-rich oatmeal will help fight off cravings because the body stays full longer, states Good Housekeeping. However, stay away from oatmeal with added sugary flavors.  

#3: Kale 

This vegetable helps rid the body of toxins and suppresses hunger, reports Elle. According to the site, about four cups of kale can help stimulate the liver’s “detoxification pathways for 48 hours.” 

#4: Eggs 

Eating eggs in the morning can help burn fat because these are full of protein. A study found that dieters who have eggs for breakfast versus a bagel lost 65 percent more weight, reports Cooking Light. 

#5: Nuts 

According to a study conducted by Purdue University, nuts help people stay full longer than rice cakes. Good Housekeeping suggests eating 24 almonds a day to stay full.  

#6: Broccoli Rabe 

This vegetable contains pytonurient sulforaphane which stimulates an enzymes that communicates to cells to burn fat, states Elle. 

#7: Greek Yogurt 

Greek yogurt has twice the protein and less than half the sugar of regular yogurts, says Cooking Light. A study revealed that people who ate 24 ounces of fat free yogurt lost an average of over 81 percent belly fat. 

#8:  Oil 

Good Housekeeping advises using monounsaturated fats while cooking, such as olive or canola oil, to control hunger. 

#9: Avocados 

Avocados are a triple threat to fat, according to Elle. Like oil, it contains monounsaturated fats. It increases the communication between cells and fat-burning hormones while turning off fat storage hormones. Plus, it can boost the metabolism. 

#10: Green and Oolong Tea 

According to Cooking Light, tea is a double threat to fat because it contains both caffeine and catechins which help boost the metabolism and fat burning mechanism. 

#11: Beans and Legumes 

Beans and legumes are full of protein and fiber which help the body lose weight and tone up, reports Good Housekeeping. 

#12: Wild Salmon 

Elle reports that wild salmon can “improve insulin sensitivity, which shrinks fat from your waistline.” In addition, the fish can boost the metabolism by activating the thyroid hormone. 

#13: Whole Grains 

Certain carbs contain fiber that can keep hunger at bay such as whole grains, reports Good Housekeeping. 

#14: Oysters 

Oysters help decrease the appetite, states Elle. They are also low in calories and help fight PMS-related cravings. 

#15: Peanut Butter 

Good Housekeepings states that PB contains Niacin, “which keeps the digestive system on track and prevents belly bloat.” However, the site suggests having only two tablespoons because PB has a lot of fat. 

 

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