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Archive for » March 13th, 2012«

Physicians Report on the 7 Foods Destroying Your Diet

/PRNewswire/ — In honor of National Nutrition Month, the physicians of BodyLogicMD urge you to take a closer look at your diet. Sure, you eat right, you exercise and you visit your doctor at least once a year, but despite your best efforts – your stomach is always upset and your waistline will not shrink. The mystery of food allergies and sensitivities is slowly unraveling as modern science learns more about immunoglobulin E – the primary antibody of the gastrointestinal tract.

(Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20120312/FL68914 )

Recent studies have pinpointed approximately 7 foods: peanuts, soy, dairy, eggs, sugar, gluten and artificial sweeteners that are common to most American diets –intentional or not – that elicit a “sensitivity” response. The symptoms of sensitivity vary from person to person and food to food.  Anything from depression, GI distress and headaches to mood swings, acne and fatigue can be the result of consuming one of these foods. “Look at the evolution of the gluten allergy – one percent of the U.S. population has been diagnosed with celiac disease, four times as many as fifty years ago.  Today, food-related health distress is a large portion of the medical business, but diagnostic criteria doesn’t exist – yet,” says Timothy Morley, D.O., New York bioidentical hormones expert and Medical Director of BodyLogicMD of Midtown Manhattan.

To give you an example of the urgency, researchers are on a quest to establish diagnostic criteria for gluten sensitivities: in February 2012, 15 experts from 7 countries submitted a proposal to The American Gastroenterological Association in hopes of bringing this matter to the forefront. “This is just the first step in dealing with the food sensitivities our modern culture has created. For every one person that gets a confirmed diagnosis of celiac disease, there are six to eight more people with symptoms, but no antibodies. We can test for allergies, but not sensitivities. These seven foods tempt, but do not necessarily evoke, a response that can be medically tested,” Morley says.

The highly-trained physicians of BodyLogicMD offer comprehensive nutrition lab testing to determine what you may be allergic to – without requiring the hassle of an oral food challenge and the physicians of this highly-trained group of doctors can guide through a nutrition program to determine and remove foods in your diet that may be causing a less than favorable experience.

About BodyLogicMD

Founded in 2003, BodyLogicMD physician-owned practices make up the nation’s largest and fastest growing network of the most highly-trained physicians specializing in bioidentical hormone replacement therapy. Integrated with fitness and nutrition programs, BodyLogicMD’s medically supervised programs are for men and women suffering from hormone imbalance associated with menopause and andropause. Also, BodyLogicMD is currently featured as an expert resource on Oprah.com and Suzanne Somers’ latest selling books, Knockout: Interviews with Doctors Who Are Curing Cancer and How to Prevent It and Break Through: Eight Steps to Wellness, and her book, Ageless: The Naked Truth about Bioidentical Hormones dedicates and entire chapter to BodyLogicMD. Florida Trend cover story December 2009, features BodyLogicMD as the national leader in the growing anti-aging industry. BusinessWeek cover story March 2006, features the BodyLogicMD start-up story.

 

Media contact:Sarah Caroscaro@bodylogicmd.com 561.972.9569        

 

SOURCE BodyLogicMD

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All red meat is bad for you, new study says

Eating red meat — any amount and any type — appears to significantly increase the risk of premature death, according to a long-range study that examined the eating habits and health of more than 110,000 adults for more than 20 years.

For instance, adding just one 3-ounce serving of unprocessed red meat — picture a piece of steak no bigger than a deck of cards — to one’s daily diet was associated with a 13% greater chance of dying during the course of the study.

Even worse, adding an extra daily serving of processed red meat, such as a hot dog or two slices of bacon, was linked to a 20% higher risk of death during the study.

“Any red meat you eat contributes to the risk,” said An Pan, a postdoctoral fellow at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston and lead author of the study, published online Monday in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Crunching data from thousands of questionnaires that asked people how frequently they ate a variety of foods, the researchers also discovered that replacing red meat with other foods seemed to reduce mortality risk for study participants.

Eating a serving of nuts instead of beef or pork was associated with a 19% lower risk of dying during the study. The team said choosing poultry or whole grains as a substitute was linked with a 14% reduction in mortality risk; low-fat dairy or legumes, 10%; and fish, 7%.

Previous studies had associated red meat consumption with diabetes, heart disease and cancer, all of which can be fatal. Scientists aren’t sure exactly what makes red meat so dangerous, but the suspects include the iron and saturated fat in beef, pork and lamb, the nitrates used to preserve them, and the chemicals created by high-temperature cooking.

The Harvard researchers hypothesized that eating red meat would also be linked to an overall risk of death from any cause, Pan said. And the results suggest they were right: Among the 37,698 men and 83,644 women who were tracked, as meat consumption increased, so did mortality risk.

In separate analyses of processed and unprocessed meats, the group found that both types appear to hasten death. Pan said that at the outset, he and his colleagues had thought it likely that only processed meat posed a health danger.

Carol Koprowski, a professor of preventive medicine at USC’s Keck School of Medicine who wasn’t involved in the research, cautioned that it can be hard to draw specific conclusions from a study like this because there can be a lot of error in the way diet information is recorded in food frequency questionnaires, which ask subjects to remember past meals in sometimes grueling detail.

But Pan said the bottom line was that there was no amount of red meat that’s good for you.

“If you want to eat red meat, eat the unprocessed products, and reduce it to two or three servings a week,” he said. “That would have a huge impact on public health.”

A majority of people in the study reported that they ate an average of at least one serving of meat per day.

Pan said that he eats one or two servings of red meat per week, and that he doesn’t eat bacon or other processed meats.

Cancer researcher Lawrence H. Kushi of the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research in Oakland said that groups putting together dietary guidelines were likely to pay attention to the findings in the study.

“There’s a pretty strong supposition that eating red meat is important — that it should be part of a healthful diet,” said Kushi, who was not involved in the study. “These data basically demonstrate that the less you eat, the better.”

UC San Francisco researcher and vegetarian diet advocate Dr. Dean Ornish said he gleaned a hopeful message from the study.

“Something as simple as a meatless Monday can help,” he said. “Even small changes can make a difference.”

Additionally, Ornish said, “What’s good for you is also good for the planet.”

In an editorial that accompanied the study, Ornish wrote that a plant-based diet could help cut annual healthcare costs from chronic diseases in the U.S., which exceed $1 trillion. Shrinking the livestock industry could also reduce greenhouse gas emissions and halt the destruction of forests to create pastures, he wrote.

eryn.brown@latimes.com

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Physicians Report on the 7 Foods Destroying Your Diet

/PRNewswire/ — In honor of National Nutrition Month, the physicians of BodyLogicMD urge you to take a closer look at your diet. Sure, you eat right, you exercise and you visit your doctor at least once a year, but despite your best efforts – your stomach is always upset and your waistline will not shrink. The mystery of food allergies and sensitivities is slowly unraveling as modern science learns more about immunoglobulin E – the primary antibody of the gastrointestinal tract.

(Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20120312/FL68914 )

Recent studies have pinpointed approximately 7 foods: peanuts, soy, dairy, eggs, sugar, gluten and artificial sweeteners that are common to most American diets –intentional or not – that elicit a “sensitivity” response. The symptoms of sensitivity vary from person to person and food to food.  Anything from depression, GI distress and headaches to mood swings, acne and fatigue can be the result of consuming one of these foods. “Look at the evolution of the gluten allergy – one percent of the U.S. population has been diagnosed with celiac disease, four times as many as fifty years ago.  Today, food-related health distress is a large portion of the medical business, but diagnostic criteria doesn’t exist – yet,” says Timothy Morley, D.O., New York bioidentical hormones expert and Medical Director of BodyLogicMD of Midtown Manhattan.

To give you an example of the urgency, researchers are on a quest to establish diagnostic criteria for gluten sensitivities: in February 2012, 15 experts from 7 countries submitted a proposal to The American Gastroenterological Association in hopes of bringing this matter to the forefront. “This is just the first step in dealing with the food sensitivities our modern culture has created. For every one person that gets a confirmed diagnosis of celiac disease, there are six to eight more people with symptoms, but no antibodies. We can test for allergies, but not sensitivities. These seven foods tempt, but do not necessarily evoke, a response that can be medically tested,” Morley says.

The highly-trained physicians of BodyLogicMD offer comprehensive nutrition lab testing to determine what you may be allergic to – without requiring the hassle of an oral food challenge and the physicians of this highly-trained group of doctors can guide through a nutrition program to determine and remove foods in your diet that may be causing a less than favorable experience.

About BodyLogicMD

Founded in 2003, BodyLogicMD physician-owned practices make up the nation’s largest and fastest growing network of the most highly-trained physicians specializing in bioidentical hormone replacement therapy. Integrated with fitness and nutrition programs, BodyLogicMD’s medically supervised programs are for men and women suffering from hormone imbalance associated with menopause and andropause. Also, BodyLogicMD is currently featured as an expert resource on Oprah.com and Suzanne Somers’ latest selling books, Knockout: Interviews with Doctors Who Are Curing Cancer and How to Prevent It and Break Through: Eight Steps to Wellness, and her book, Ageless: The Naked Truth about Bioidentical Hormones dedicates and entire chapter to BodyLogicMD. Florida Trend cover story December 2009, features BodyLogicMD as the national leader in the growing anti-aging industry. BusinessWeek cover story March 2006, features the BodyLogicMD start-up story.

 

Media contact:Sarah Caroscaro@bodylogicmd.com 561.972.9569        

 

SOURCE BodyLogicMD

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AIJ’s Asakawa Declines Request to Speak to Diet Over Losses

AIJ Investment Advisors Co.
President Kazuhiko Asakawa declined a request to appear before a
parliamentary committee seeking answers over how the suspended
fund manager lost as much as $2 billion of pension money.

“Unfortunately I am unable to take up the offer,” Asakawa
said, according to a faxed statement read by Banri Kaieda,
chairman of the lower house financial committee, to reporters in
Tokyo today. Asakawa wrote that he is busy compiling information
requested by the government’s financial watchdog, Kaieda said.

Asakawa’s reply is his first statement to be made public
since the Financial Services Agency suspended AIJ on Feb. 24 for
a month to find out what happened to the 185.3 billion yen
($2.3 billion) of pension assets managed by his firm. The case
has prompted the regulator to embark on its widest investigation
of asset managers in the country and spurred politicians to
consider increased oversight of the industry.

The FSA’s investigative arm, the Securities and Exchange
Surveillance Commission, “is still continuing its inspection,”
Asakawa wrote, according to Kaieda. “I am busy as we are
preparing documents to detail the assets under management by the
March 23 deadline,” Kaieda quoted Asakawa as saying.

Tokyo-based AIJ told regulators that its assets under
management have dwindled to about 24 billion yen, including 4
billion yen in cash and deposits, a government official said
last week on condition of anonymity.

To contact the reporter on this story:
Takashi Hirokawa in Tokyo at
thirokawa@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story:
Chitra Somayaji at
csomayaji@bloomberg.net;
Peter Hirschberg at
phirschberg@bloomberg.net

Overweight pet? Try a vet-approved diet plan

Question: I have a 4-year-old female Labrador retriever who weighs 85 pounds. My veterinarian told me she is overweight and needs to lose more than 10 pounds. What suggestions do you have to help her lose weight?

Answer:

Your Labrador is not alone. More of our pets are becoming overweight or obese. A recent veterinary survey conducted by the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention found that 53 percent of adult dogs and 55 percent of cats were classified as overweight or obese by their veterinarian.

Unfortunately, pet owners may not be aware that their pet is overweight, nor may they realize the potential health consequences.

Pet obesity is associated with several serious and debilitating health conditions including osteoarthritis and diabetes mellitus. It has been shown that overweight dogs have a decreased life span when compared with dogs who maintain a lean body condition. Reducing weight in overweight arthritic dogs improves mobility. It’s never too late to help your pet achieve a healthy weight.

For readers who are unsure if their pet is at an optimal weight, I would encourage you to ask your veterinarian. Your pet should have a waist that can either be seen or felt when viewed from above and you should be able to feel her ribs with just a slight fat covering. Find out what your pet weighed last year to see if she has gained weight.

One tip that will help with your dog’s weight-loss plan is to determine how many calories she is currently eating. If you are not already doing so, measure the amount of pet food you are feeding. You can contact the manufacturer to find out how many calories are in a cup or can of her food.

Treats, chews and table foods are often a major source of extra calories. All foods have calories and need to be counted in a weight loss plan. Pet food manufacturers can tell you how many calories are in the treats and rawhide chews that you might be feeding.

As a general guideline, treats, chews and table foods should not constitute more than 10 percent of your pet’s total daily calorie intake. Therefore feeding lower calorie treats such as green beans rather than higher-calorie fatty meats or rawhides may help. Also, give more “non-food” rewards such as a scratch on the head or a quick game of fetch so that the majority of your interactions are not food focused.

Ask your veterinarian to recommend a complete and balanced food that is formulated for weight loss. These diets deliver all the nutrition your pet needs with fewer calories. Many also have certain nutrients that can help your pet feel full while losing weight.

It’s very important that cats do not lose weight too quickly or they may develop a very serious condition called hepatic lipidosis; ask your veterinarian for guidance regarding feeding amounts.

The key to successful weight loss is monitoring. Weigh your pet every two to four weeks to make sure she is losing at an appropriate rate. The amount of calories your individual pet needs to lose weight may be very different from another pet, so the feeding amount will vary from pet to pet. Your veterinarian can help you develop an appropriate plan.

Low-impact exercise such as walking or swimming can be a great way to burn calories, but ask your veterinarian if your pet has any conditions that might restrict the amount or type of exercise. Cats may enjoy playing with you by chasing a laser pointer or using an interactive feeding toy so that they can “hunt” for their food.

Helping your pet achieve a healthy weight is one of the most important things you can do for her overall health. As with diet plans in people, it takes commitment and determination, but the rewards are well worth the effort.

Ask the Vets is a weekly column published by The Record. This question was answered by Dr. Laura Eirmann of Oradell Animal Hospital in Paramus, N.J.

Do you have a question about your pet’s health? E-mail it to pets@northjersey.com. Please include your name, address and phone number.

Cake: the breakfast of diet champions

It might sound too good to be true, but according to a study by Tel Aviv University, a low-calorie meal plan that includes dessert with breakfast may help dieters.

In the randomised study, 193 obese people were separated into two diet groups, both totaling 1400 calories for women and 1600 for men. The two diets were identical except one had a 600 calorie high-carborhydrate, protein-enriched breakfast with a choice of chocolate, cookies, cake or ice cream for dessert. The second group was restricted to a 300 calorie low-carb breakfast.

At the four month mark, weight loss in both groups was on par with each participant having lost an average of 33 pounds. However, shortly after the results took a surprising turn. Participants in the large-breakfast group lost another 15 pounds each, those in the low-carb group regained an average of 22 pounds each. At the end of the program, those who had less restrictive breakfasts had lost an average of 40 pounds more per person than their peers.

Breakfast is the meal that most successfully regulates ghrelin, the hormone that increases hunger, said the lead researcher on the study, Professor Daniella Jakubowicz.

Those on the dessert diet maintained lower levels of ghrelin and reported significantly higher levels of fullness throughout the study.

Attempting to avoid sweets entirely might be initially effective, but can increase dieters cravings that result in a weight relapse, she explained.

The researchers concluded that a high carbohydrate and protein breakfast may prevent weight regain by reducing diet-induced hunger, cravings and ghrelin suppression. They emphasised that to achieve long-term weight loss, meal timing and macronutrient composition must balance these compensatory treats.

“Most people simply regain weight, no matter what diet they are on,” said the lead author, Dr Jakubowicz told the New York Times. “But if you eat what you like, you decrease cravings. The cake — a small piece — is important.”

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