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Diet Doc’s New CarbZap Prescription Effectively Blocks …

CHARLESTON, WV–(Marketwired – February 01, 2017) – Low-carb or ketogenic diets are traditionally great for rapid weight loss, but many who suddenly embark on this style of dieting must often pay a steep price due to common side effects such as fatigue, irritability and low-energy. Not to mention, leaving potatoes and other healthy starches out of the diet in order to lose weight can result in nutritional deficiencies over time. Nationally recognized weight loss program, Diet Doc has formulated a new starch and carbohydrate blocker – CarbZap, a highly effective weight loss aid. CarbZap users can eat meals high in carbs and starches without the fear of excess weight gain or other conditions that come with high carb consumption. This innovative new prescription reduces sugar and carbohydrate absorption by breaking them down and eliminating them from the body before they can be converted into fat by:

  • Blocking the absorption of carbohydrates and sugars
  • Increasing starch excretion
  • Reducing body weight (averaging 4 pounds per month)
  • Reducing abdominal fat

CarbZap will help you to enjoy the health benefits that come with reduced carb intake such as better regulated blood sugar, and an increased metabolism for faster weight loss. Due to its carbohydrate-blocking benefits, caloric restriction is not necessary for individuals taking CarbZap since most carbs are not converted into fat but are instead excreted from the body. This helps to eliminate the fatigue, incessant hunger, cravings and decreased physical activity that often comes with low-calorie dieting. For those who regularly maintain carb restricted diets, the supplement can be particularly useful to boost the digestion and elimination of carbs during those occasional ‘cheat days’ when taken before carb laden meals.

Contact Diet Doc today for instant access to this powerful weight loss aid. Diet Doc’s CarbZap has been carefully formulated by their own in-house doctors as a great weight loss catalyst on its own, or in conjunction with any one of our medical weight loss plans to help boost results safely and rapidly. Diet Doc’s diet plans are developed according to each patient’s health history to create personalized diet plans to promote quick weight loss, encourage weight management and improve conditions associated with excessive carbohydrate intake.

New Diet Doc patients can call or easily and effortlessly visit https://www.dietdoc.com to complete an initial comprehensive, yet simple, health questionnaire and schedule an immediate personal, no-cost consultation. Diet Doc Physicians all received specialized training in nutritional science and fast weight loss. Diet Doc reviews each patient’s health history to create a personalized diet plan geared for fast weight loss, or that addresses life-long issues causing weight loss to slow down or stop. Nutritionists work personally with each patient and use their own algorithm to craft meal and snack plans that are compatible with each patient’s age, gender, activity level, food preferences, nutritional needs and medical conditions. They combine these state of the art diet plans with pure, prescription diet products that enable their patients to resist the temptation to reach for sugary snacks, eliminate fatigue and curb the appetite. Over 97% of Diet Doc patients report incredible weight loss results with the majority losing 20 or more pounds per month.

At Diet Doc, all patients gain unlimited access to the best minds in the business. Their staff of doctors, nurses, nutritionists and coaches are available 6 days per week to answer questions, offer suggestions, address concerns and lend their professional guidance and support. Because of this, more and more people are turning to Diet Doc for their weight management needs. Diet plans are tailored to be specific to the needs of those of any age, gender, shape or size and for those who are struggling to lose that final 10-20 pounds to those who must lose 100 pounds or more. Call today to request a private, confidential, no-cost online consultation.

About the Company:

Diet Doc Weight Loss is the nation’s leader in medical, weight loss offering a full line of prescription medication, doctor, nurse and nutritional coaching support. For over a decade, Diet Doc has produced a sophisticated, doctor designed weight loss program that addresses each individual specific health need to promote fast, safe and long term weight loss.

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DietDocMedical

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DietDocMedicalWeightLoss/

Linkedin: https://www.Linkedin.com/company/diet-doc-weight-loss?trk=biz-brand-tree-co-logo

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Diet Doc’s New CarbZap Prescription Effectively Blocks …

CHARLESTON, WV–(Marketwired – February 01, 2017) – Low-carb or ketogenic diets are traditionally great for rapid weight loss, but many who suddenly embark on this style of dieting must often pay a steep price due to common side effects such as fatigue, irritability and low-energy. Not to mention, leaving potatoes and other healthy starches out of the diet in order to lose weight can result in nutritional deficiencies over time. Nationally recognized weight loss program, Diet Doc has formulated a new starch and carbohydrate blocker – CarbZap, a highly effective weight loss aid. CarbZap users can eat meals high in carbs and starches without the fear of excess weight gain or other conditions that come with high carb consumption. This innovative new prescription reduces sugar and carbohydrate absorption by breaking them down and eliminating them from the body before they can be converted into fat by:

  • Blocking the absorption of carbohydrates and sugars
  • Increasing starch excretion
  • Reducing body weight (averaging 4 pounds per month)
  • Reducing abdominal fat

CarbZap will help you to enjoy the health benefits that come with reduced carb intake such as better regulated blood sugar, and an increased metabolism for faster weight loss. Due to its carbohydrate-blocking benefits, caloric restriction is not necessary for individuals taking CarbZap since most carbs are not converted into fat but are instead excreted from the body. This helps to eliminate the fatigue, incessant hunger, cravings and decreased physical activity that often comes with low-calorie dieting. For those who regularly maintain carb restricted diets, the supplement can be particularly useful to boost the digestion and elimination of carbs during those occasional ‘cheat days’ when taken before carb laden meals.

Contact Diet Doc today for instant access to this powerful weight loss aid. Diet Doc’s CarbZap has been carefully formulated by their own in-house doctors as a great weight loss catalyst on its own, or in conjunction with any one of our medical weight loss plans to help boost results safely and rapidly. Diet Doc’s diet plans are developed according to each patient’s health history to create personalized diet plans to promote quick weight loss, encourage weight management and improve conditions associated with excessive carbohydrate intake.

New Diet Doc patients can call or easily and effortlessly visit https://www.dietdoc.com to complete an initial comprehensive, yet simple, health questionnaire and schedule an immediate personal, no-cost consultation. Diet Doc Physicians all received specialized training in nutritional science and fast weight loss. Diet Doc reviews each patient’s health history to create a personalized diet plan geared for fast weight loss, or that addresses life-long issues causing weight loss to slow down or stop. Nutritionists work personally with each patient and use their own algorithm to craft meal and snack plans that are compatible with each patient’s age, gender, activity level, food preferences, nutritional needs and medical conditions. They combine these state of the art diet plans with pure, prescription diet products that enable their patients to resist the temptation to reach for sugary snacks, eliminate fatigue and curb the appetite. Over 97% of Diet Doc patients report incredible weight loss results with the majority losing 20 or more pounds per month.

At Diet Doc, all patients gain unlimited access to the best minds in the business. Their staff of doctors, nurses, nutritionists and coaches are available 6 days per week to answer questions, offer suggestions, address concerns and lend their professional guidance and support. Because of this, more and more people are turning to Diet Doc for their weight management needs. Diet plans are tailored to be specific to the needs of those of any age, gender, shape or size and for those who are struggling to lose that final 10-20 pounds to those who must lose 100 pounds or more. Call today to request a private, confidential, no-cost online consultation.

About the Company:

Diet Doc Weight Loss is the nation’s leader in medical, weight loss offering a full line of prescription medication, doctor, nurse and nutritional coaching support. For over a decade, Diet Doc has produced a sophisticated, doctor designed weight loss program that addresses each individual specific health need to promote fast, safe and long term weight loss.

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DietDocMedical

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DietDocMedicalWeightLoss/

Linkedin: https://www.Linkedin.com/company/diet-doc-weight-loss?trk=biz-brand-tree-co-logo

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Diet Doc’s New CarbZap Prescription Effectively Blocks Carbohydrates During Meals

CHARLESTON, WV–(Marketwired – February 01, 2017) – Low-carb or ketogenic diets are traditionally great for rapid weight loss, but many who suddenly embark on this style of dieting must often pay a steep price due to common side effects such as fatigue, irritability and low-energy. Not to mention, leaving potatoes and other healthy starches out of the diet in order to lose weight can result in nutritional deficiencies over time. Nationally recognized weight loss program, Diet Doc has formulated a new starch and carbohydrate blocker – CarbZap, a highly effective weight loss aid. CarbZap users can eat meals high in carbs and starches without the fear of excess weight gain or other conditions that come with high carb consumption. This innovative new prescription reduces sugar and carbohydrate absorption by breaking them down and eliminating them from the body before they can be converted into fat by:

  • Blocking the absorption of carbohydrates and sugars
  • Increasing starch excretion
  • Reducing body weight (averaging 4 pounds per month)
  • Reducing abdominal fat

CarbZap will help you to enjoy the health benefits that come with reduced carb intake such as better regulated blood sugar, and an increased metabolism for faster weight loss. Due to its carbohydrate-blocking benefits, caloric restriction is not necessary for individuals taking CarbZap since most carbs are not converted into fat but are instead excreted from the body. This helps to eliminate the fatigue, incessant hunger, cravings and decreased physical activity that often comes with low-calorie dieting. For those who regularly maintain carb restricted diets, the supplement can be particularly useful to boost the digestion and elimination of carbs during those occasional ‘cheat days’ when taken before carb laden meals.

Contact Diet Doc today for instant access to this powerful weight loss aid. Diet Doc’s CarbZap has been carefully formulated by their own in-house doctors as a great weight loss catalyst on its own, or in conjunction with any one of our medical weight loss plans to help boost results safely and rapidly. Diet Doc’s diet plans are developed according to each patient’s health history to create personalized diet plans to promote quick weight loss, encourage weight management and improve conditions associated with excessive carbohydrate intake.

New Diet Doc patients can call or easily and effortlessly visit https://www.dietdoc.com to complete an initial comprehensive, yet simple, health questionnaire and schedule an immediate personal, no-cost consultation. Diet Doc Physicians all received specialized training in nutritional science and fast weight loss. Diet Doc reviews each patient’s health history to create a personalized diet plan geared for fast weight loss, or that addresses life-long issues causing weight loss to slow down or stop. Nutritionists work personally with each patient and use their own algorithm to craft meal and snack plans that are compatible with each patient’s age, gender, activity level, food preferences, nutritional needs and medical conditions. They combine these state of the art diet plans with pure, prescription diet products that enable their patients to resist the temptation to reach for sugary snacks, eliminate fatigue and curb the appetite. Over 97% of Diet Doc patients report incredible weight loss results with the majority losing 20 or more pounds per month.

At Diet Doc, all patients gain unlimited access to the best minds in the business. Their staff of doctors, nurses, nutritionists and coaches are available 6 days per week to answer questions, offer suggestions, address concerns and lend their professional guidance and support. Because of this, more and more people are turning to Diet Doc for their weight management needs. Diet plans are tailored to be specific to the needs of those of any age, gender, shape or size and for those who are struggling to lose that final 10-20 pounds to those who must lose 100 pounds or more. Call today to request a private, confidential, no-cost online consultation.

About the Company:

Diet Doc Weight Loss is the nation’s leader in medical, weight loss offering a full line of prescription medication, doctor, nurse and nutritional coaching support. For over a decade, Diet Doc has produced a sophisticated, doctor designed weight loss program that addresses each individual specific health need to promote fast, safe and long term weight loss.

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DietDocMedical

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DietDocMedicalWeightLoss/

Linkedin: https://www.Linkedin.com/company/diet-doc-weight-loss?trk=biz-brand-tree-co-logo

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An Overview Of Trump’s Relationship To Diet And Food Policy

Food, like many things during the Donald Trump era, is under attack. Here are a few of the ways:

USDA

Former Georgia governor Sonny Perdue became Trump’s nominee for United States Department of Agriculture secretary on January 18, 2017, two days before his inauguration. Already it was reported by Politico that the delay in nomination was causing strife among farmers who voted for Trump. Barack Obama, George W. Bush, and Bill Clinton each made their agriculture secretary picks in December. That said, Perdue’s nomination pleases the factory farming lobby, which hopes Perdue will, like the rest of Trump’s cabinet, ease regulations on things like pollution and animal abuse.

While Perdue is well-liked by the American Farm Bureau Federation—he grew up on a farm, he has a doctorate in veterinary medicine, and he ran a fertilizer company—his torch burns mainly for factory farming, but both Politico and The Huffington Post have reported that Perdue is, at best, a “passive participant” in one of the worst salmonella outbreaks in U.S. history in 2009. In the outbreak that originated at the Peanut Corporation of America in Blakely, Georgia, nine people died and 700 people got sick throughout 46 states. Then, he basically hid when the state’s agriculture commissioner tried to reform a law that would require farms to report positive tests for pathogens within 24 hours.

“I never did directly meet with Sonny on this particular legislation,” former Republican state Senator John Bulloch, who was behind the bill, told Politico. “Every time we made changes, (staff) carried it to Sonny. I don’t remember that they ever came back with suggestions, changes. But if he had concerns, I know I would have heard from him.”

Did we mention Perdue would be in charge of the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS), the division of the USDA that checks meat and poultry at factory farms and pressures them to do recalls if pathogens are found? Already FSIS has had a hiring freeze, causing delayed testing in the pathology lab. Sounds safe to us.

Perdue has also been described as a climate change denier; more on that later.

And finally, the USDA is the branch of government that deals with food stamps and other government food assistance programs. These will all surely be threatened under the Trump administration, which has a mandate to cut programs that benefit the poor.

Nutrition Policy

Michelle Obama’s nutrition policy was her centerpiece. The former First Lady helped create the Partnership for a Healthier America and tons of initiatives. First there was Let’s Move!, her program to fight against childhood obesity. She got schools to serve more fruits, vegetables, and even whole grain pasta and bread. She supported and promoted the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, which authorized funding and set policy for all kinds of USDA programs such as WIC, the National School Lunch Program, and the School Breakfast Program. She got chefs to partner with schools and teach kids about healthier diets; she got Wal-Mart to lower prices on fruits and vegetables; she promoted working out (as in actually hitting the gym); she pushed for better food labels; and she planted an organic garden at the White House.

The list goes on…

Trump, meanwhile, is somewhere between 236 and 267 pounds, which wouldn’t be notable, except he is constantly fat-shaming people. He thinks making speeches is “exercise.” He has posted pictures on social media of his meals: a whole bucket of Kentucky Fried Chicken and lots of McDonald’s. He skips breakfast (or eats bacon and eggs), loves overdone steak, and munches on Doritos for a snack.

And it’s not just his personal diet that makes Trump a food nightmare: Vanity Fair described his Trump Grill as being possibly “the worst restaurant in America.” While that’s not really a nutritional evaluation, we can’t imagine Trump Grill being healthy at all.

What’s worse is that the Republican-led Congress, in collaboration with Trump, could dial back some of Michelle Obama’s good work—particularly the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act, which, of course, Republicans hate because it benefits poor people.

And then there’s the ridiculous stuff like the crusade representative Todd Rokita (R-Ind.) is on to make sure that “the First Lady Michelle Obama-inspired nutrition standards are revised so that school food is more edible.” We wonder if he’ll call a spade a spade, and name his bill the Unhealthy Kids Act?

FDA

Jim O’Neill is Trump’s nominee for Food and Drug Administration secretary. Not a ton is known about O’Neill other than that he’s something of a Peter Thiel lackey. Much has been written about his support for an open kidney market (“There are plenty of healthy spare kidneys walking around, unused,” he has said), his agreement with Thiel that taking young people’s blood and circulating it into old people combats aging, and his plans to deregulate the pharmaceutical industry.

Less is known about O’Neill’s stance on food, though if confirmed, he’ll be in charge of the administration that oversees food safety, additives, and supplements. One thing is known, though: O’Neill believes algae to be the future of food. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, though some algae have been proven to be unsafe for human consumption.

What is more known is Trump’s stance on the FDA. He actually wants to dismantle it; one of his press releases denounced the “FDA Food Police, which dictate how the federal government expects farmers to produce fruits and vegetables, even dictates the nutritional value of dog food. The rules govern the soil farmers use, farm and food production hygiene, food packaging, food temperature and even what animals can roam which fields and when. It also greatly increased inspections of food ‘facilities’ and levies new taxes to pay for this inspection overkill.”

So basically, he thinks making sure food is safe is “overkill.” He might revise that line of thinking when reduced regulation turns overkill into, well, kill—when people start dying from easily testable foodborne pathogens.

Mexico Tariff

One of the Trump’s campaign promises was to build some kind of wall between Mexico and the United States, estimated at $20 billion, which doesn’t make sense for a bunch of reasons, but makes less sense when he expects Mexico to pay for it. Of course they’re not going to pay for it.

Instead of Mexico paying for the wall, Trump has said that he will impose a 20 percent tax on imported Mexican goods to get them to “pay” for the wall, in a roundabout way.

But this is patently absurd. First off, if he did that, Mexico would undoubtedly place a similar tariff on American goods, which support nearly a million American jobs. Secondly, imported cars and car parts, machinery, mineral fuels, and medical instruments (more than $200 billion worth of imports) would suddenly see their prices rise. This is not good for American consumers at all.

Finally, there’s food. Mexico is the second-largest supplier of agricultural products to the United States after Canada, totaling approximately $21 billion in 2015, including $9.1 billion worth of fresh fruits and vegetables.

Things we import from Mexico: avocados, tomatoes, berries, papaya, and sugar. We also imported a lot of tequila, mezcal, and nearly $2 billion worth of beer.

If the prices of those foods go up 20 percent, it could put a huge dent in the average American’s wallet.

LGBTQ Food Access

One of the executive orders, the so-called “First Amendment Defense Act,” which is predicted to come out of the White House in the coming days is the order that companies can refuse service to anyone based on their religious values.

The main cases that have challenged this (and lost), of course, are bakeries refusing to bake cakes for gay marriages. But if this executive order comes through, it will probably cause all kinds of chaos. Most Christian denominations don’t recognize gay marriage. Southern Baptists believe being gay or being transgender is a sin. If the executive order is signed, it won’t be long before restaurants in the South stop serving all people equally.

(Of course, more importantly than restaurants are the healthcare providers, landlords, and employers that will be able to discriminate against LGBTQ people if they claim religious beliefs.)

Department of Labor

Trump’s nominee for Labor secretary is Andrew Puzder, the CEO of CKE Restaurants, the company that franchises Carl’s Jr. and Hardee’s. If there’s a list of “unhealthiest burgers in America,” it’s rare not to find those two chains listed.

Puzder himself is a real piece of work. “[Mr. Puzder is] a man whose business record is defined by fighting against working people,” Richard L. Trumka president of the A.F.L.-C.I.O. told The New York Times last year.

He’s so much against working people that he prefers robots, which are “always polite, they always upsell, they never take a vacation, they never show up late, there’s never a slip-and-fall or an age, sex or race discrimination case,” he told Business Insider last year.

Not only that, Puzder’s restaurants had a “disturbing rate of sexual harassment,” reported The Guardian. Two-thirds of the female employees at restaurants managed by CKE said they’d experienced sexual harassment in the workplace, a figure well above industry averages.

This may not be surprising from a guy whose company’s ad features bikini-clad women eating burgers, but from a Labor Secretary? It should be shocking and unacceptable.

Environment

This might be the big one, because the EPA currently (and we’ll see how long this stays up on the site, because the Trump administration has a penchant for scrubbing climate science from government websites) states that climate change is to blame for many extra costs in the food production chain.

“For example, in 2010 and 2012, high nighttime temperatures affected corn yields across the U.S. Corn Belt, and premature budding due to a warm winter caused $220 million in losses of Michigan cherries in 2012,” the EPA’s website says.

It also says: “In 2011, exposure to high temperature events caused over $1 billion in heat-related losses to agricultural producers.” And concludes with, “Impacts to the global food supply concern the United States because food shortages can cause humanitarian crises and national security concerns. They also can increase domestic food prices.”

More than 97 percent of peer-reviewed climate science research shows human-caused climate change is already happening. Let’s contrast that with the Trump administration’s stance on climate change: it doesn’t exist.

Want proof? Sonny Perdue, the guy Trump nominated for USDA secretary, once tried to pray away a drought.

Myron Ebell, an adviser to Trump on the environment during his transition, has been called “an alarmist with ridiculous views who knows nothing about climate change” by then-U.K. Chief Scientist David King in 2005.

Trump’s nominee for EPA administrator is Scott Pruitt. Pruitt has sued the EPA 14 times on behalf of oil companies to attack water and clean air protections against things like mercury, arsenic, and sulfer dioxide.  He has gone on record mocking the Clean Air Act and questioning why the EPA exists at all. Pruitt self-identifies as “a leading advocate against the EPA’s activist agenda.” He has also come out with the opinion that the EPA holds no authority in the regulation of greenhouse gases; thankfully, the Supreme Court disagreed with that.

For the first time ever, the National Wildlife Federation is calling on members of Congress from both sides of the aisle to reject Pruitt. And scientists are planning a March for Science on Washington.

Trump’s antiscience cabal has clearly influenced him. In the next few days, Trump is expected to sign an executive order to pull out of the Paris agreement, an ambitious treaty to combat climate change signed by 127 countries. 

Conclusion

None of this is going to change anyone’s minds about Trump, but an increase in foodborne illness is just another issue every American is likely going to be dealing with in the future. Without the Affordable Care Act, uninsured people might not get to hospitals in time. And in the long term, climate change might wipe out agriculture in the United States as we know it. It’s a ticking time bomb. The best way to deal might be to stay informed, shop at farmer’s markets, and generally be aware of what to do if you think you have salmonella or listeria. It’s a brave new world, but healthy and safe food doesn’t seem to be an important part of it.

Drawing up a diet plan

With the Kerala government’s decision to implement the National Food Security Act (NFSA) from April, the whole country will be covered by the legislation. However, if we expect the NFSA to improve India’s malnutrition statistics, we may well be disappointed. According to a study by Himanshu and Abhijit Sen, even before the NFSA is fully implemented, use of the public distribution system (PDS) expanded sharply with proportion of households getting PDS subsidy rising from about 25% in 2004-05 to 50% in 2011-12. However, decline in child malnutrition has been far more modest.

A patchy record

While we still do not have nationwide data on malnutrition, State-wise data from Annual Health Survey/District Level Health Surveys of 2012-14 as well as National Family Health Survey IV of 2015-16 suggest only modest improvement in child malnutrition since the National Family Health Survey III of 2005-06. Proportion of households receiving PDS subsidies in Rajasthan increased by about 15 percentage points, underweight declined by 3 percentage points; neighbouring Madhya Pradesh experienced similar increase in the PDS but a sharper decline underweight (17 percentage points); another neighbour Gujarat shows a drop in PDS use but records a modest improvement in underweight statistics (5 percentage points). The strangest case is that of Andhra Pradesh where 59% of the population received PDS subsidy in 2004-05 rising to 76 % in 2011-12 but underweight rate seems to be stuck around 32% with hardly any improvement.

Why do we see this disconnect? Critiques of the PDS may point to leakages and suggest that perhaps these subsidies are not reaching the target beneficiaries. However, a large number of studies have recorded improving performance of the PDS and suggest this may be an overly cynical assumption. Other critiques may argue that with rising incomes, poverty has fallen in India and regardless of the PDS, individuals may get sufficient calories, making changes in PDS use irrelevant to caloric intake. This also seems somewhat of an overreach, given the entrenched poverty in some sections of the country and society.

A recently released report based on India Human Development Survey of 2004-05 and 2011-12 suggests that the relationship between the PDS and nutrition may be more complex. Jointly organised by researchers from National Council of Applied Economic Research and University of Maryland, this is the first nationwide survey to interview the same households at two points in time. By matching households with similar income, family size, land ownership and place of residence, but one group with Below Poverty Line (BPL) or Antyodaya Anna Yojana (AAY) card and the other without these cards, this study is able to compare apples to apples and examine the role of the PDS in a quasi-experimental design.

The results suggest that access to PDS subsidies changes the way people allocate their household resources. When rice, wheat and other cereals are available cheaply, households try to get more of their required calories from cereals and less from milk, fruits and vegetables. Results show that households with BPL/AAY cards consume a monthly per capita average of 11.87 kg of cereals, but only 2.77 litres of milk. In contrast, households without BPL/AAY cards but at the same income level, consume somewhat less cereals (11.22 kg) but more milk (3.21 litres). One would normally expect that the savings from cereal purchase due to price subsidies would be used to buy milk, fruit and nuts, but in an era where school and medical costs are rising and households face many other demands on their purse, these savings seem to be spent on non-food items. Food consumption forms 56% of household budget in BPL/AAY households compared to a slightly higher level (58%) in matched households without access to PDS subsidies.

A prior study using the same data and a similar matching procedure, published in a joint NCAER/Brookings journal, India Policy Forum, found that households with a BPL/AAY card were no better than households without PDS subsidies when it came to child nutrition. This may well be because access to cheap calories reduces consumption of different foods and dietary diversity is very important for balanced nutrition.

This does not mean that we should do away with food subsidies. The NCAER report mentioned earlier also found that for very poor households or households that experience income declines of 20% or more between the two surveys, access to the PDS is very important for preserving food intake and dietary diversity. When faced with a sharp income decline, households with BPL/AAY cards reduce their cereal intake by 770 g per capita per month, and maintain their milk intake. In contrast, households who can’t avail of food subsidies reduced their monthly per capita cereal intake by 930 g and milk intake by 280 milliliters.

Nudged towards better choices

The challenge lies in providing assistance to needy households to ensure adequate diets without creating conditions in which they opt for inferior diets that are heavy on cereals. This is a particular challenge for modern India where rates of diabetes, high blood pressure and heart conditions are on the rise. Indian immigrants in the U.S. and U.K. also suffer from higher prevalence of these conditions than the native-born. So it may be that Indians have greater genetic predisposition for these so-called “lifestyle” diseases, but it is also well recognised that these diseases are exacerbated by excessive consumption of carbohydrates, amply available in cereals.

Cash transfers may be one way of dealing with this challenge. They would allow households to invest in better diets without circumscribing what they consume. However, their success would depend on the ability to effectively administer transfers and reduce leakages. Moreover, how this may affect grain markets remains unknown. International research on cash versus in-kind food subsidies presents mixed results, with the effectiveness of cash transfers depending on the institutional framework. Current debates on Universal Basic Income tend to see it as an additional component of social safety nets. But if the mechanisms for effective administration of the UBI are in place, it is possible to make a case for replacing PDS by cash transfers on nutritional grounds and this is well within the framework laid down by the NFSA.

Sonalde Desai is Professor of Sociology at University of Maryland and Senior Fellow at National Council of Applied Economic Research. Views are personal.

Beyond the gluten-free gimmick: How to actually lose weight

It’s one of the biggest diet trends to ever sweep the nation.

Restaurants now offer special menu items of it and Whole Foods dedicates an entire aisle to it. We’ve heard it’s healthier, will make us thin, and give us more energy, too. We are going gluten-free!

A food or diet advertised as gluten-free typically gives the impression that it’s healthier, and great for weight loss. This is the gluten-free gimmick and if you haven’t fallen for it in the slightest bit once or twice, then good for you, because the food industry and media push this reputation pretty hard. The problem is, when some people try gluten-free diets, weight gain is actually the result.

Gluten-intolerant people can enjoy an abundance of health benefits when they go gluten-free. Avoiding gluten in cases of intolerance is linked to positive psychological and physical benefits.

For those who aren’t intolerant, however, following a gluten-free diet can mean an overload of refined carbohydrates, and as a result, sluggish energy and weight gain. After all, French fries, soda and lard are all gluten-free!

More on this…

With that being said, it is possible to go gluten-free and still lose weight. Here’s how:

1) Run Away from the Gluten-Free Aisle

“Gluten-free” does not equal “healthy,” nor does it equal “healthy for weight loss.” Just because a product is gluten-free does NOT mean it is healthy.

When approaching a gluten-free diet, people often simply replace gluten-full foods like pasta and bread and replace them with their gluten-free counterpart products, like gluten-free pasta, gluten-free bread, pretzels, cake mix, cookies etc – the list goes on. Such products are typically marketed as “healthy.”

Avoid these foods. Gluten-free specialty products usually use corn or potato starch, instead of wheat, so they’re just as high in carbohydrates as their gluten-containing counterparts. Instead, use following a gluten-free diet as an opportunity to introduce more whole foods into your meals.

2) Find High Fiber Varieties of Gluten-Free Products

What does “gluten-free” usually equal? Fiber-free.  One major flaw of a gluten-free diet is the lack of fiber. Also, when the gluten is removed from products, fiber and B vitamins often go with it. Fiber helps keep us full, boost our metabolism, and control our blood sugar levels, all of which can aid in sustained energy and weight loss.

High fiber and minimally processed gluten-free products include those made with psyllium husk, flax seeds, and chia seeds. All of these are naturally gluten-free and an easy way to add fiber to your diet. Gluten-free specialty products made with these ingredients may also be a better choice than those made with brown rice flour. Check the labels to find the products with the most fiber.

3) Incorporate Non-Starchy Veggies

Instead of replacing gluten with other energy-dense foods, take the gluten-free diet as an opportunity to introduce more whole foods into your life. Next time you’re in the supermarket, spend more time in the produce aisle.

All non-starchy vegetables are naturally gluten-free, low calorie, and provide you with the fiber you’re missing from the omitted whole-grains. Some non-starchy vegetables include salad greens, artichokes, tomatoes, onions, beets, carrots and most green vegetables. At breakfast, add a mix of spinach, tomatoes, and onions to your egg scramble. At lunch, load your salad with artichokes, kale, peppers, tomatoes, hearts of palm, carrots, and beets.  And at dinner, swap pasta for zucchini noodles topped with tomato sauce and ground turkey.

4) Stick to a Serving

You can also replace bread, pasta, and oats with naturally gluten free starches like sweet potato, spaghetti squash, butternut squash, parsnips, quinoa and brown rice. However, these foods are a concentrated source of carbohydrates, so the amount you eat is important.

Restaurants typically serve up massive portions of grains because they are cheap to produce and expensive to sell. A quinoa bowl with 2 cups of quinoa and sweet potatoes is equivalent in carbohydrates to eight slices of white bread. Remember to stick to a serving of these starchy vegetables and gluten-free grains. A serving of quinoa and brown rice is 1/3 cup, and a serving of sweet potato 1/2 cup, and a serving of squash is a cup.

5) Replace Buckwheat with Baked Apples

Use your gluten elimination diet as an excuse to eat real foods by making it a baked good elimination diet too! Fruits are another naturally gluten-free food that can add fiber to your diet while satisfying your sweet tooth. Consider adding a cup of raspberries to breakfast to boost the fiber content by 8 grams, or dip strawberries in dark chocolate for a gluten-free dessert option. Other ideas include stuffing raspberries with dark chocolate chips, or making baked apples with cinnamon.

 

Tanya Zuckerbrot MS, RD, is a Registered Dietitian in New York City and the author of two bestselling diet books: The F-Factor Diet and The Miracle Carb Diet: Make Calories and Fat Disappear – with Fiber.

Subscribe to Tanya’s FREE Weekly Newsletter and follow her on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest. To learn more about Tanya’s private nutrition counseling services visit www.ffactor.com.

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