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Diet Doc Offers Safer Weight Loss Results For New hCG Diet With …

CASPER, WY–(Marketwired – February 16, 2017) – Despite the fact that nearly 80% of Americans are attempting to eat healthier meals and nearly 20% are dieting actively, obesity rates have been rapidly rising in the U.S. for the last 50 years. In the meanwhile, the weight loss market has reached over $64 billion. With the excessive amounts of fatty foods and sugary drinks in the American diet, weight loss supplements alone may not affect obesity rates much. Nutritional counseling and medical weight loss is a serious option to consider, particularly for overweight and obese individuals who are consistently struggling with weight loss.

In such cases, one weight loss solution that may be recommended is a customized hCG diet plan, which is different from the original Simeons hCG diet. The original hCG diet, also called the Simeons method, was developed in the 1950s and known to be dangerous because it was was practically a starvation diet that limited daily consumption to 500 calories. Diet Doc, a nationally recognized weight loss center, has discouraged the Simeons method since 2009, determining it to be too risky through in-house studies. Since the 1950s, medical experts have managed to better understand hCG and the dietary conditions it necessitates to be safe and effective at the same time. Now, hCG can be applied in a safer, non-harmful setting and the Simeons method is unnecessary and unrecommended. After thorough research over the last several decades, Diet Doc has created a flexible diet program that involves consuming no less than 800 calories (and up to 1250 calories) daily without negatively affecting the rate of rapid weight loss. These high-calorie programs offering safe weight loss are advised for patients considering hCG treatment.

At Diet Doc, patients can get a thorough understanding of the weight loss needs and develop an individualized diet based on their nutritional needs or even their genetics. Genetic testing is particularly recommended as it results in effective weight loss in the long run. All Diet Doc programs, including the hCG diet for moderate to extreme cases, provide a doctor-supervised, customized diet plan.

Instead of encouraging patients to adopt harmful dietary practices with no prior medical knowledge, Diet Doc consults with patients to provide a detailed weight loss plan based on their nutritional needs and medical history. Losing weight with Diet Doc is safe, simple and affordable. Nutrition plans, exercise guidance, motivational support, and dietary supplements are all part of the package. More than 90% of Diet Doc patients lose 20 or more pounds every month.

Patients can get started immediately, with materials shipped directly to their home or office. They can also maintain weight loss in the long-term through weekly consultations, customized diet plans, motivational coaches and a powerful prescription program. With Diet Doc, the doctor is only a short phone call away and a fully dedicated team of qualified professionals is available 6 days per week to answer questions, address concerns and support patients.

Getting started with Diet Doc is very simple and affordable. New patients can easily visit https://www.dietdoc.com to quickly complete a health questionnaire and schedule an immediate, free online consultation.

About the Company:

Diet Doc Weight Loss is the nation’s leader in medical, weight loss offering a full line of prescription medication, doctor, nurse and nutritional coaching support. For over a decade, Diet Doc has produced a sophisticated, doctor designed weight loss program that addresses each individual specific health need to promote fast, safe and long term weight loss.

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DietDocMedical
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DietDocMedicalWeightLoss/
LinkedIn: https://www.LinkedIn.com/company/diet-doc-weight-loss?trk=biz-brand-tree-co-logo

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How to lower blood pressure – just add THIS to your diet TWICE a week

Professor Douglas Toucher who led the research, said: “Instead of eating one portion of farmed salmon, we would need to eat two portions of farmed salmon.”

“Other fish such as trout, herring, sardines and tuna also provide a source of omega-3 and the recommendations are to eat one serving each week.”

A You Gov survey conducted by Seafish this week found that two thirds – 66 per cent – of adults in the UK aren’t eating enough fish and are missing targets set to help protect heart health.

TV programme Trust Me I’m A Doctor last night revealed that are health benefits to including omegas-3 in diet – whether that be from eating fish or taking a good quality supplement.

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Dr. Luke Slammed Kesha In An Email For Breaking Her Diet By Drinking A Diet Coke

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Theo Wargo / Getty Images

Emails between Dr. Luke and Kesha’s manager that were filed in court this week detail how the music producer berated the pop star about her weight, citing it in one instance as the reason top songwriters and producers didn’t want to work with her.

Dr. Luke — aka Lukasz Gottwald — and Kesha have been in an ongoing legal fight since October 2014, when they filed dueling lawsuits against each other. Kesha sued the music producer in California for sexual assault and battery, sexual harassment, unfair business practices, and infliction of emotional distress. Dr. Luke then filed a lawsuit against Kesha in New York claiming breach of contract and defamation.

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Dr. Luke. Richard Shotwell / AP

In her lawsuit, Kesha accused Dr. Luke of verbally and physically abusing her while they worked together, as well as raping her when she was unconscious. She also alleges that Dr. Luke repeatedly harassed her about her weight, calling her a “fat fucking refrigerator.” Dr. Luke has denied the claims.

Kesha later checked into a rehabilitation treatment facility for bulimia, severe depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and panic attacks, according to court documents.

Kesha’s California case was put on hold in June 2015 after a judge ruled that the New York case takes precedent. Kesha has since dropped the case to concentrate on defending herself in New York.

Last year, a Manhattan judge denied Kesha’s request to get out of her exclusive contract with Dr. Luke. In her ongoing quest to be freed from the contract, Kesha’s lawyers this week released emails that show Dr. Luke criticizing the pop star over her weight.

Kesha wants to be freed “from her abuser and rebuild her physical, emotional, and mental health,” her lawyers stated in court documents filed Tuesday in a Manhattan court.

In an email dated June 28, 2012, Dr. Luke wrote, “We all get concerned when she is breaking her diet plan.”

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“We have seen it happen multiple times … almost every day. It is also double concerning when the A list songwriters and producers are reluctant to give kesha their songs because of her weight.”

In another email, he said, “We have all witnessed her breaking her diet plan. this perticular [sic] time it happened to be diet coke and turkey while on an all juice fast. we just wanna see her stick to the plan for her benefit and the benefit of her career. please help her keep on her diet.”

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Kesha’s manager, Monica Cornia, responded saying that the singer was working really hard and that “she’s a human and not a machine.”

“And to get in trouble for drinking a Diet Coke and called out in front of the whole room when she’s not there is not okay,” Cornia wrote. “If she were gaining weight or not losing I would totally get it. Everyone wants her to be the best she can be. But she is still a human being who has feelings and major insecurities and she is doing her very best and I would hope you could be support of that.”

Dr. Luke’s attorney, Christine Lepera, accused Kesha and her attorneys of cherry-picking the evidence to mislead the public.

“Rather than agree to a thorough disclosure, Kesha and her representatives improperly publicized, without court permission, three out-of-context emails, which do not present the full picture regarding the events they concern,” Lepera said. “For example, these emails do not show that the lyrics of ‘Crazy Kids’ were, in fact, rewritten at Kesha’s request. Any claim by Kesha to the contrary is deceiving the public, just like her other meritless claims of wrongdoing by Dr. Luke.”

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Diet Doc Offers Safer Weight Loss Results For New hCG Diet With Customized Diet Planning

CASPER, WY–(Marketwired – February 16, 2017) – Despite the fact that nearly 80% of Americans are attempting to eat healthier meals and nearly 20% are dieting actively, obesity rates have been rapidly rising in the U.S. for the last 50 years. In the meanwhile, the weight loss market has reached over $64 billion. With the excessive amounts of fatty foods and sugary drinks in the American diet, weight loss supplements alone may not affect obesity rates much. Nutritional counseling and medical weight loss is a serious option to consider, particularly for overweight and obese individuals who are consistently struggling with weight loss.

In such cases, one weight loss solution that may be recommended is a customized hCG diet plan, which is different from the original Simeons hCG diet. The original hCG diet, also called the Simeons method, was developed in the 1950s and known to be dangerous because it was was practically a starvation diet that limited daily consumption to 500 calories. Diet Doc, a nationally recognized weight loss center, has discouraged the Simeons method since 2009, determining it to be too risky through in-house studies. Since the 1950s, medical experts have managed to better understand hCG and the dietary conditions it necessitates to be safe and effective at the same time. Now, hCG can be applied in a safer, non-harmful setting and the Simeons method is unnecessary and unrecommended. After thorough research over the last several decades, Diet Doc has created a flexible diet program that involves consuming no less than 800 calories (and up to 1250 calories) daily without negatively affecting the rate of rapid weight loss. These high-calorie programs offering safe weight loss are advised for patients considering hCG treatment.

At Diet Doc, patients can get a thorough understanding of the weight loss needs and develop an individualized diet based on their nutritional needs or even their genetics. Genetic testing is particularly recommended as it results in effective weight loss in the long run. All Diet Doc programs, including the hCG diet for moderate to extreme cases, provide a doctor-supervised, customized diet plan.

Instead of encouraging patients to adopt harmful dietary practices with no prior medical knowledge, Diet Doc consults with patients to provide a detailed weight loss plan based on their nutritional needs and medical history. Losing weight with Diet Doc is safe, simple and affordable. Nutrition plans, exercise guidance, motivational support, and dietary supplements are all part of the package. More than 90% of Diet Doc patients lose 20 or more pounds every month.

Patients can get started immediately, with materials shipped directly to their home or office. They can also maintain weight loss in the long-term through weekly consultations, customized diet plans, motivational coaches and a powerful prescription program. With Diet Doc, the doctor is only a short phone call away and a fully dedicated team of qualified professionals is available 6 days per week to answer questions, address concerns and support patients.

Getting started with Diet Doc is very simple and affordable. New patients can easily visit https://www.dietdoc.com to quickly complete a health questionnaire and schedule an immediate, free online consultation.

About the Company:

Diet Doc Weight Loss is the nation’s leader in medical, weight loss offering a full line of prescription medication, doctor, nurse and nutritional coaching support. For over a decade, Diet Doc has produced a sophisticated, doctor designed weight loss program that addresses each individual specific health need to promote fast, safe and long term weight loss.

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DietDocMedical
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DietDocMedicalWeightLoss/
LinkedIn: https://www.LinkedIn.com/company/diet-doc-weight-loss?trk=biz-brand-tree-co-logo

Healthy Diet Cuts Women’s Risk of New-Onset RA

Another reason has emerged for following a healthy diet over the long term: a lower risk of being diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), particularly the seropositive form, before your mid-50s.

According to a new analysis published in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases and based on two Nurses’ Health Study cohorts, women ages 55 or younger in the highest quartile of diet quality had two-thirds the risk of those in the lowest-quality quartile (HR 0.67, 95% CI 0.51-0.88, P for trend = 0.002).

Overall, women in the highest quartile of the Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI-2010) had a 15% reduced risk compared with those in the lowest quartile (HR 0.85, 95% CI 0.70-1.02, P for trend = 0.08).

With stratification by serostatus, the inverse association in women 55 and younger was strongest for seropositive RA, with a hazard ratio of 0.60 for quartile 4 versus quartile 1 (95% CI 0.42-0.86, P for trend = 0.003).

No significant association was found, however, for women older than 55, which may suggest differing risk factors for early- and late-onset RA, the researchers said.

Moderate alcohol consumption and lower intake of red meat were the dietary components most strongly associated with decreased early-onset RA risk, while other associations failed to reach statistical significance. “These results indicate that an overall healthy diet quality may be more beneficial for RA risk reduction than individual foods and nutrients, particularly for early-onset seropositive RA,” wrote Bing Lu, DrPH, MD, of Harvard Medical School in Boston, and colleagues.

They followed 76,597 women in the Nurses’ Health Study, launched in 1976, and 93,392 women in the Nurses’ Health Study II, launched in 1989, whose baseline ages were 30-55 and 25-42, respectively. The two-cohort study period spanned the years 1984 to 2010, and the mean follow-up was 21.6 years. Participants had no RA or other connective tissue disease at entry, and their information was updated every 4 years. The primary outcome measure was RA with two subtypes, seropositive and seronegative.

Diets were assessed using the AHEI-2010, a dietary quality score based on the U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans and composed of 11 foods and nutrients consistently associated with lower or higher chronic disease risk.

Among the index items, fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, long-chain omega-3 fat, polyunsaturated fat, and moderate alcohol consumption were deemed healthy dietary components, while sugar-sweetened beverages (including fruit juice), red and processed meat, trans fat, and sodium were deemed unhealthy items.

“Owing to the rich contents of dietary antioxidants, fruits and vegetables have long been suggested as healthy foods that may be effective for RA prevention,” Lu and colleagues wrote.

A total of 1,007 RA cases were identified — 624 seropositive and 383 seronegative. Baseline scores on the AHEI-2010 in the two cohorts ranged from 15.6 to 100.1 and 13.7 to 95.8, respectively. A higher baseline AHEI-2010 score was positively associated with desirable lifestyle and socioeconomic status, physical activity, alcohol consumption, and multivitamin use. A higher score was also associated with a lower body mass index and total energy intake and a lower likelihood of being parous or a current smoker.

The team noted that previous studies have strongly linked higher scores on the AHEI-2010 with a reduced risk for chronic conditions including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and certain cancers, but this is the first to investigate the association between overall dietary quality and risk of autoimmune diseases such as RA.

The study results parallel Lu et al’s earlier finding that the positive association between obesity and RA is also restricted to women diagnosed at a younger age, suggesting that there are different age-related risk factors, the team said. “It is proposed that later-onset RA may be different from earlier-onset RA in terms of genetic predisposition and immune dysfunction, and hormonal changes with menopause can be a source of RA activation in older female patients.”

Asked for his opinion of the study, James O’Dell, MD, chief of the Division of Rheumatology at the University of Nebraska in Omaha, said, “This is no great surprise. We know you can have a very modest effect on existing RA by consuming low-inflammatory foods.”

The downside to data like these, he added, is that some people think they can treat existing RA with diet alone: “A patient with RA came to see me a few years ago and decided to treat her disease with diet and supplements like fish oil and turmeric. She came back after a year, and she was in terrible shape.”

Still, the results offer promise for early primary intervention in susceptible people. “We now have the ability to identify patients at high risk for RA, based largely on anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide [ACCP] antibodies,” O’Dell told MedPage Today. “We’ve done this in some cases based on ACCP testing of first-degree relatives, and we’d love to be able to say, ‘These antibodies show you have a 50% risk of getting RA in 2 years, and here are a few things you can do to decrease that risk.’ We’re not there yet, but we’re working on it.'”

Dietary modification might well be a part of the prevention plan. “It’s a big maybe, but results like these are encouraging,” O’Dell said. First-degree relative testing has identified subsets with high-risk antibodies and genes that portend the development of RA. “We’re following them to see what predicts onset, and one of the things being looked at in that cohort is diet.” But how dramatic the effect of dietary modification would be remains unclear — “will it decrease the incidence by 2% or by 50%?”

Among the study’s limitations noted by Lu and colleagues were the possibility of residual confounding from unmeasured dietary factors and the possibility that a better diet may be a marker of a generally healthy lifestyle. In addition, the findings from the study’s largely white, well-educated healthcare professionals may not applicable to other populations.

The study was supported by the National Institutes of Health and the Rheumatology Research Foundation.

Lu and co-authors reported no conflicts of interest.

  • Reviewed by
    F. Perry Wilson, MD, MSCE Assistant Professor, Section of Nephrology, Yale School of Medicine and Dorothy Caputo, MA, BSN, RN, Nurse Planner

What To Do If You Want To Lose Weight—But Just Can’t Motivate Yourself To Get Started

Creating a game plan can be overwhelming, especially if you have no idea where you’re starting. Enter, food journaling. Tracking your intake can make you feel more in control of your eating habits, and in turn, motivated to make small changes to your current diet. “Because you’re making small modifications to your current behaviors, as opposed to trying to adhere to a new diet altogether, many find it more sustainable, as well as educational,” says San Diego-based culinary dietitian Nancy Snyder, R.D. In time, you’ll have proof of the legit progress you’re making, which can help you stay motivated over the long haul.

Just make sure you approach the process with an opportunistic mindset for setting goals, not as a forced recalling of “good” and “bad” behavior, says Snyder. That will make you lose sight of the big picture.

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