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Weight loss: Greggs UK diet plan helps fans shed pounds – and sausage rolls are on the menu

While Saturday, which involves an egg roll, sausage roll, coconut, lime and chilli chicken salad and fruit has just over 1000 calories – half of what women are recommended, it has 20g of saturated fat, the total limit of what women are recommended.

Eating foods that contain saturated fats raises the level of cholesterol in your blood.

A nutritionist has recently warned about the prevalence of trans fats in Briton’s foods.

Angela Ginn-Meadow, R.D., also a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, told Women’s Health: “Trans fat increases your overall cholesterol, lowers your ‘good cholesterol,’ and raises your ‘bad cholesterol.’”

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Rob Gronkowski is going to eat like Tom Brady

Rob Gronkowski isn’t exactly a poster boy for healthy living. That would be his teammate Tom Brady, whose aggressively healthy diet puts the rest of us to shame. But Gronk is giving Brady’s lifestyle a shot to try to extend his NFL career.

And he’s even making Brady do some of the work for him, according to Karen Guregian of the Boston Herald.

“Tom’s my chef. I told him I’m only eating them if you have them ready for me,” Gronkowski said. “And he said, ‘Deal.’”

Gronk is the best tight end in the NFL, and it’s not close. But he missed eight games last season with a back injury that required surgery. Meanwhile, his seemingly ageless quarterback continued to be at the peak of his game. That’s why Gronkowski wants to adopt Brady’s approach to diet and health.

“Just looking at Tom, seeing what he does every day, what he eats, talking to him, personally one-on-one, just learning about the body with him, just seeing how flexible he is, how pliable he is, how loose he is all the time, every day and ready to go, I just felt like it was the time in my career where I needed to devote myself at all levels,” Gronkowski said, via Guregian.

Gronkowski is working with Alex Guerrero, who is in charge of Brady’s TB12 Sports Therapy Center, to improve his flexibility and durability and avoid injuries.

“I just felt like I had to add on to what I was doing,” Gronkowski said. “Find a way that my body will respond so I can perform every day. Be in prevention mode for injuries happening.”

Gronk’s fun-loving persona isn’t all that consistent with Brady’s reputation for healthy living. While Brady is all the way into things like eating avocado ice cream and not drinking coffee or alcohol, Gronkowski said he probably won’t go quite that far. But there are consequences.

Every time Gronk drinks something that isn’t on the diet plan, whether it’s coffee or alcohol, he has to drink three glasses of water. We’re assuming Gronkowski is well-hydrated these days.

The program for Gronkowski includes resistance band work, deep tissue massage, and a strict diet, of course. It certainly seems to be working for Brady. If it keeps Gronkowski on the field for the Patriots, some avocado ice cream is probably worth it.

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Danielle Elkins: Good things come to those who eat their veggies

This month I hit the 35-pound weight loss mark and several people have asked questions about how I did it.

I’d like to tell them it was easy, but I can’t. I learned there’s no quick fix, magic pill or five-minute workout that will do the trick.

When I tell people I have four cups of raw broccoli and a protein shake for lunch almost every day, they look at me like I’m crazy, like I’m torturing myself. But honestly, I was torturing myself before, when I was eating fast food for lunch every day. A cheeseburger and fries would satisfy me for as long as it took me to eat it, then leave me feeling sluggish the rest of the day.

I’ve always had an unhealthy relationship with food. I don’t like vegetables, and I love foods high in simple carbohydrates and saturated fat. As I grew older and further from having the metabolism of an active teenager, those delicious foods took their toll on my body.

The extra weight gain caused me to turn to fad dieting and diet pills, resulting in a vicious seven-year cycle of “yo-yo dieting.”

Fad diets, like the Atkins low-carb diet, would work for about a month before I’d cave in once then give up. Diet pills would work for a couple of months before their effects wore off and my cravings returned, causing me to binge-eat.

After trying a prescription diet pill again and finding myself weak from not eating enough to function normally, I’d had enough.

The diet pills had caused me to drop weight rapidly, but, based on my past experiences, I knew I would gain back the weight quickly if I didn’t do something.

Someone I know had recently found success with Beachbody’s 21 Day Fix program, so I decided to give it a try, although I was skeptical of an at-home program.

The 21 Day Fix program came with a booklet and color-coded portion control containers for vegetables, fruits, complex carbohydrates, lean proteins, healthy fats and seeds or Fix-approved dressings. The booklet explained the containers, gave examples of clean foods that go in each and offered recipes. It also guided me through calculating my basal metabolic rate, which determined how many calories I was allowed daily. The calorie bracket I was in based on my BMR determined how many servings of each container I was allowed daily.

I streamed the 21 Day Fix workouts through the Beachbody OnDemand application I downloaded to my Roku on my home television, making it possible for me to roll out of bed and do the 30-minute workouts in my living room.

Within a few weeks, I saw results so I kept going — and I’m still going.

Six months later, I feel better than ever, and I’m seeing muscle definition.

I attribute my success to the fact that the 21 Day Fix program helped me make a lifestyle change. I don’t severely restrict or eliminate food groups, such as carbohydrates, like I did on fad diets. Instead, I eat foods from each group in moderation and allow myself a weekly cheat meal for balance.

Beachbody programs like the 21 Day Fix may not be for everyone but the take-away from my experience is that understanding your body’s needs is vital to long-term weight management.

If you’re going from fad diet to fad diet or taking diet pills but never reaching your goals, try a balanced clean-eating plan with regular, varied exercise and see how it changes your life for the better.

There are other options if you don’t want to purchase a program or hire a personal trainer. A Google search can help you calculate your BMR and learn about your body’s macronutrient needs, the difference between clean and processed foods, what a proper portion is for each food group and how many daily servings to eat of each. Several websites offer free workout videos, instruction on proper form, healthy recipes and other diet and exercise advice. Smartphone applications like MyFitnessPal can help you to set calorie, macronutrient and exercise goals, and keep track of what you eat.

Don’t forget to eat your vegetables.

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Maybe this is why you can’t lose the weight

After decades of pushing single plans and products that didn’t prove effective for a large chunk of the population, the health and wellness industry is finally zeroing in on more precise solutions tailored to the individual.

Here’s a look at some of the latest programs, tools and products designed to take your overall health to the next level.

At-home diet testing

Viome, a Silicon Valley startup founded by tech billionaire Naveen Jain, uses an analysis of the microorganisms in your gut microbiome, as well as your metabolism and the proteins in your blood to make create personalized dietary recommendations that he says will enhance biochemistry, promote weight loss and ward off disease.

The new service delivers test kits that collect information through stool samples, saliva and blood glucose testing. The results and dietary recommendations are delivered via a consumer app. Follow-up tests kits track progress.

Cognitive decline could be reduced with a Mediterranean-style diet

Researchers say that greater adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet in later life may help to reduce cognitive decline.

A wealth of studies have suggested that a healthful diet may help to protect the brain against the effects of aging. New research adds fuel to the fire, after finding that following a Mediterranean-style diet in later life could help to stave off cognitive decline.

Researchers found that older adults who had diets similar to the Mediterranean diet or the Mediterranean-DASH diet Intervention for Neurodegeneration Delay (MIND) – which is a diet that incorporates features of the Mediterranean diet – scored significantly better on cognitive tests than those who followed less healthful diets.

Study co-author Dr. Kristine Yaffe, of the University of California, San Francisco, and colleagues recently reported their findings in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Low in junk foods and dairy products and high in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and olive oil, the Mediterranean diet is considered one of the most healthful diets to follow.

Not only have studies linked the Mediterranean diet to better heart health and reduced cancer risk, but research has also shown the diet to have cognitive benefits.

Another diet associated with better cognitive function is the appropriately named MIND diet. This eating plan consists of 10 foods that are considered beneficial for the brain, many of which are included in the Mediterranean diet, such as vegetables, whole grains, and olive oil.

For the new study, Dr. Yaffe and colleagues set out to gain a better understanding of the link between Mediterranean-style diets and cognitive function, noting that “variation between studies makes it difficult to draw firm conclusions.”


‘Important public health implications’

To reach their findings, the researchers analyzed the data of 5,907 older adults who were a part of the Health and Retirement Study.

All adults completed food frequency questionnaires. The researchers used information from these questionnaires to determine how closely subjects followed a Mediterranean or MIND diet.

Participants also underwent cognitive assessments, which included tests of working memory, episodic memory, and attention.

The team found that adults who had higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet were 35 percent less likely to have poor test scores, compared with adults who followed less healthful diets.

Even older adults with moderate adherence to the Mediterranean diet were 15 percent less likely to have poor test scores, the researchers report.

Similar results were found for subjects with moderate or high adherence to the MIND diet.

Additionally, the study revealed that the incidence of cognitive impairment was lower among older adults with greater adherence to the Mediterranean or MIND diets.

According to Dr. Yaffe and colleagues, these findings indicate that a Mediterranean-style diet could protect against cognitive decline among older adults, which may “have important public health implications for preservation of cognition during aging.”

“Given the limited evidence base and lack of clear dietary recommendations for cognitive health, further prospective population-based studies and clinical trials are required to elucidate the role of dietary patterns in cognitive aging and brain health,” conclude the researchers.

Baked potato for breakfast, special ‘wonder soup’ and NO bananas allowed: Controversial ‘GM Diet’ that can see you …

  • The GM Diet has made a resurgence after being popular in the eighties  
  • The low carb diet sees people lose up to seven kilos in just seven days  
  • The diet revolves heavily around fruit and vegetables and minimal meat  
  • Dietitians say it is okay to follow, as long as it is only followed for a week at a time 

Laura House For Daily Mail Australia

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As the warmer months edge ever closer, many are searching for a quick fix to help them get back into shape. 

And the controversial GM Diet (General Motors Diet) promises just that, with the old school program promising to help people shed up to seven kilos in just one week. 

The low carb diet was developed by General Motors company to help keep their employees healthy and was a big hit throughout the eighties. 

Now with its resurgence, it has been named as one of the most searched diets on Google for 2017. 

As the warmer months edge ever closer, many are searching for a quick fix to help them get back into shape… and the controversial GM Diet (General Motors Diet) promises just that

Day one sees people ‘fruit loading’ with water-based fruit (no banana)

So how does it work? 

Basically, those who follow the diet have to follow a set of very strict rules each day to see results.  

And according to Accredited Practising Dietitian, Lisa Renn, the diet lends itself to being just a one week diet – and not a day longer. 

‘There are a lot of rules but I guess each day has its different rules to follow which, once you’ve got the rules in front of you, is fairly simple,’ she told A Current Affair. 

And on day two, they start the day with a large baked potato with butter or olive oil and have as many vegetables as they want throughout the day (except for peas, corn and carrots)

Any fruit and veggies are allowed on day three (except for bananas and potatoes) 

What is the purpose of the GM Diet? 

The diet plan works on the principle that the foods you eat will burn more calories than they provide for your body. 

This causes a negative caloric effect in the body and thus help in losing weight naturally without any exercise.

Several people have reported weight loss between 10 to 17 pounds per week by following this plan. 

Source: GM Diet  

Day one sees people ‘fruit loading’ with water-based fruit (no banana) and on day two, they start the day with a large baked potato with butter or olive oil. 

They then have as many vegetables as they want throughout the day (except for peas, corn and carrots) before eating any vegetables they like on day three. 

By day four the banana ban is over and a serving of the GM ‘Wonder Soup’ is included which is made with cabbage, celery, onion and green peppers. 

‘The particular soup in this diet is looking at very low starch vegetables which again is fine. You can make yourself a nice vegetable soup. That’s actually fine,’ Lisa said. 

By day four the banana ban is over and a serving of the GM ‘Wonder Soup’ is included which is made with cabbage, celery, onion and green peppers

On day five meat is introduced combined with ‘five or six tomatoes’ 

On day five meat is introduced combined with ‘five or six tomatoes’ and on day six, people can enjoy unlimited lean protein and vegetables – but no potatoes are allowed. 

On day seven, people have a serving of brown rice in the morning followed by as many vegetables and fruits as they like.  

Lisa recommends only following this for one week and seeing it as a way to kickstart a healthier way of life. 

‘It can be a good idea but it’s really important that you learn something about sustainable healthy eating,’ she said. 

On day six, people can enjoy unlimited lean protein and vegetables - but no potatoes are allowed and on day seven, people have a serving of brown rice in the morning followed by as many vegetables and fruits as they like

On day six, people can enjoy unlimited lean protein and vegetables - but no potatoes are allowed and on day seven, people have a serving of brown rice in the morning followed by as many vegetables and fruits as they like

On day six, people can enjoy unlimited lean protein and vegetables – but no potatoes are allowed and on day seven, people have a serving of brown rice in the morning followed by as many vegetables and fruits as they like

Because it is such a low carb diet and not very sustainable, only very low intensity workouts like yoga are recommended while following the program

According to the GM Diet website, most of the weight is lost during the first three days of the program when it is at its strictest. 

This is due to the food being very low in calories – about 1,000 to 1,200 worth of calories each day.  

Because it is such a low carb diet and not very sustainable, only very low intensity workouts like yoga are recommended while following the program. 

What do you eat across the seven days?  

Day one: Water-based fruits (no bananas) with no limit. Melon is recommended. 

Day two: All vegetables are allowed either raw or cooked and no fruits are allowed. The day is started with a baked potato to provide the body with carbs for the day. 

Day three: Blend of the previous two days but no potatoes or bananas. 

Day four: Bananas and milk are allowed today as well as vegetables and fruit. 

Day five: Beef, chicken and fish are introduced along with five to six whole tomatoes. 10 to 12 glasses of water are recommended on this day.

Day six: Beef and vegetables are encouraged on this day.

Day seven: Brown rice for breakfast followed by fruit juice and unlimited fruits and vegetables.


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