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Body & Mind Medical Weight Loss Center’s Jump Start to Health® Program Delivers Visible Results With 10-Day …

ONTARIO, Calif., Aug. 8, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — For those looking to quickly, safely lose weight and improve their health markets, Body Mind Medical Weight Loss Center (http://www.bodyandmindontario.com/) offers the KE Diet as part of its innovative Jump Start to Health® program. This medically supervised intervention has already helped patients achieve tremendous results; more information about the program is available by calling 844-695-4331.


Before photo of one of our patients



After image, loss of 22 pounds


“Burning fat is key to losing weight and reversing lifestyle diseases like hypertension and type 2 diabetes,” says Dr. Tanya Scurry, founder and medical director of Body Mind Medical Weight Loss Center, “and the KE Diet has proven to be the best and safest way to turbocharge the fat-burning process. That’s why it’s an important element of our Jump Start to Health® program. At Body Mind Medical Weight Loss Center, we’re helping people embrace a better way of life.”

The KE Diet is administered during the first 10 days of the Jump Start to Health® program. Patients receive a complete education on the diet during their intake and throughout the program. Under local anesthesia, a small naso-gastric tube is inserted to continuously deliver a specially formulated feeding solution rich in protein and fat. An obesity medicine physician closely monitors the patient throughout the diet, with no less than three follow-up appointments. Lab tests before and during the KE Diet ensure patient safety by checking electrolyte levels, ketones and other important markers.

Originally developed in Italy, the KE Diet has helped hundreds of thousands of people lose significant amounts of weight in a short time. At Body Mind Medical Weight Loss Center, a 56-year-old male with hypertension, high cholesterol and an increased amount of abdominal fat shed 22 pounds in only ten days.

The KE Diet works by forcing the body to burn fat rather than carbohydrates for energy. The feeding solution has zero carbs, which acts as a “hard reset” for the body. While carbs are an important part of a balanced diet, the standard American diet of today suffers from an excess of this macronutrient. Simple, highly palatable carbs are especially a problem. Many preventable health issues are a direct result of excess fat and obesity caused by carb-rich diets. The 12-week Jump Start to Health® program offers the tools and resources to learn healthier food choices and eating habits.

To qualify for the KE Diet, patients must have a body mass index (BMI) over 30, or over 27 with a medical condition related to obesity — sleep apnea, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, etc. Patients of normal weight but high body fat percentages (over 25 percent for men, 32 percent for women) may also participate.

Once the KE Diet portion of the Jump Start to Health® program concludes, patients work with a registered dietitian to develop a personalized meal plan to sustain their progress and set them on a path for a lifetime of better health. Patients also receive a personal fitness assessment by a personal trainer. The goal, according to Dr. Scurry, is to be successful in fat loss, not just weight loss.

About Body Mind Medical Weight Loss Center

Under the leadership of Dr. Tanya Scurry, the goal of Body Mind Weight Loss Center is to provide a helping hand to those struggling with obesity, to provide an ear to listen to their pain, to lift them up in encouragement and support, and to provide a safe place for them to heal.

Contact:

Dr. Tanya Scurry
909-443-5191
[email protected]

View original content with multimedia:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/body–mind-medical-weight-loss-centers-jump-start-to-health-program-delivers-visible-results-with-10-day-medically-supervised-ke-diet-300500939.html

SOURCE Body Mind Medical Weight Loss Center

Related Links

http://www.bodyandmindontario.com

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Does the controversial Ketogenic Diet REALLY work? Dietitians give their verdict on the low carb high fat program …

Favoured by the likes of Kim Kardashian and Gwyneth Paltrow for its rapid results, the Ketogenic Diet has been making headlines non-stop over the past 12 months.

The low carbohydrate, high fat program sees participants eat moderate protein and receive the majority of their energy intake from fat.

But does it really work?

The Dietitians Association of Australia recently weighed in on the controversial diet and revealed the three things people need to consider before jumping on board the Keto bandwagon. 

The low carbohydrate, high fat Ketogenic Diet sees participants eat moderate protein and receive the majority of their energy intake from fat

The Dietitians Association of Australia recently weighed in on the controversial diet and revealed the three things people need to consider before jumping on board the Keto bandwagon

The Dietitians Association of Australia recently weighed in on the controversial diet and revealed the three things people need to consider before jumping on board the Keto bandwagon

The Dietitians Association of Australia recently weighed in on the controversial diet and revealed the three things people need to consider before jumping on board the Keto bandwagon

What is the Keto Diet? 

A Keto Diet is rich with foods that contain a high amount of healthy fats such as nuts, avocado, oils and fish and the focus is on these good fats rather than bad, like milk, butter and cream.

They are low in carbohydrates and are made up of 5-20 per cent of carbohydrates, whereas a standard diet has 30-50 per cent.

If your diet is low in carbohydrates your body is shifted into ‘ketosis’, which is when fat stores in the body are broken down into ketones, which fuel the muscles and the brain.

This then results in enhanced fat burning and relatively quick weight loss. 

In a recent media alert, the DAA first explained the thinking behind the program and how it works.  

‘As fat is the main source of energy being consumed, the body must then use this (that is, break it down) as its main energy source or “fuel”,’ they explained. 

‘When dietary fat is metabolised for energy, by-products called “ketone bodies” (molecules that are made by the liver from fatty acids) are produced which are used up by the body’s tissues, muscles and the brain. This process is known as “ketosis”.

‘The body can enter ketosis during times of severe energy restriction (such as during fasting or starvation) or prolonged intense exercise, or when carbohydrate intake is reduced to around 50g per day, or less – the equivalent of around two slices of bread, and a banana.’

On average, we eat only half the recommended daily amounts of at least 25g of fibre for women and 30g for men – and being on a ketogenic diet will make it harder to meet these targets

While there are many low carb, high fat diets available, the Keto Diet remains ‘proportionately lower in carbohydrates’ at around 20 to 50 grams per day to keep the body ‘in a state of ketosis’. 

When it comes to weight loss, the DAA says those who follow a Keto Diet will ‘undoubtedly result in short-term weight loss’.

This, they explain, probably comes down to ‘a reduction in total energy (kilojoule) intake, the depletion of liver and muscle glycogen stores and associated water, and a reduced appetite’.

When it comes to weight loss, the DAA says those who follow a Keto Diet will ‘undoubtedly result in short-term weight loss’

What is 20-50g of carbohydrates the equivalent of?

In fact, the 20-50g of carbohydrates allowed in a KD is equivalent (in carbohydrate terms) to just a small tub of yoghurt, an apple, and half a medium potato over a day. 

So, using fruit as an example, following a KD would likely mean limiting fruit to only one serve a day, or eating it in place of other nutritious foods like vegetables, dairy foods, and grains. 

This requirement to strictly limit certain foods makes it near impossible to meet nutrients needs without supplementation. 

Despite this short-term weight loss, it is important to maintain a healthy weight by following a sustainable eating pattern long-term. 

‘With this in mind, dietary recommendations should always be tailored to an individual – as everyone is unique, and what works for one person, may not work for another. That is, there is no one-size-fits-all approach when it comes to achieving and maintaining a healthy weight,’ they said.

The diet has a number of limitations, with the DAA admitting it is ‘undoubtedly difficult to stick to because it drastically reduces the intake of a number of food groups’.

These food groups include fruit and vegetables, dairy foods, and grain foods and carbohydrate-containing foods, such as breads, cereals, rice, pasta, legumes, fruit, and starchy vegetables (like pumpkin, peas, and potato) must all be limited.

A ketogenic diet is based around a very low carbohydrate diet, which means nutritious foods like vegetables and fruit, wholegrains and dairy foods will need to be limited

Because the diet is also low in fibre, gastrointestinal symptoms can also show including constipation. 

According to the DAA, this could also mean an increased risk of bowel cancer in the long term. 

Other challenges include those relating to the social aspects of eating.

The low amount of wholegrains, fruits and vegetables is also concerning as wholegrains are linked with a reduced risk of health conditions and fruits and vegetables are an excellent source of vitamins, minerals and fibre. 

What to consider before trying the Keto Diet?  

You will be missing out on some seriously healthy foods 

A ketogenic diet is based around a very low carbohydrate diet, which means nutritious foods like vegetables and fruit, wholegrains and dairy foods will need to be limited. In fact, the 20-50g of carbohydrates allowed in a ketogenic diet is equivalent (in carbohydrate terms) to just a small tub of yoghurt, an apple, and half a medium potato over a day.

It might affect your gut health 

As well as filling us up, fibre from fruit, vegetables, legumes and wholegrains is vital for a healthy gut – such as to support the growth of ‘good’ bacteria and to keep the lining of the bowel healthy. On average, we eat only half the recommended daily amounts of at least 25g of fibre for women and 30g for men – and being on a ketogenic diet will make it harder to meet these targets.

You may find it hard to stick with  

The best ‘diet’ is one that ticks off all your nutritional needs, fits with your lifestyle, and that you enjoy. If you get these right – you’re onto a winner over the long-haul! Many studies show those on a ketogenic diet find it difficult to sustain, due to its restrictive nature (which can also make family meal times and outings with friends more complicated).

The DAA says the diet is not recommended for the general population ‘as the long term efficacy and safety of the diet are unknown, having only been studied in the short term’

‘The fibre in wholegrains, fruit, vegetables, and legumes supports the growth of “good” bacteria, which keeps the lining of the bowel healthy,’ the DAA explained. 

‘On average, we eat only half the recommended daily amounts of at least 25g of fibre for women and 30g for men – and being on a ketogenic diet will make it harder to meet these targets.’

All in all, the DAA agree that the diet does offer some metabolic benefits when followed in the short term and poses as ‘a novel treatment for certain medical conditions’.

Despite this, they say the diet is not recommended for the general population ‘as the long term efficacy and safety of the diet are unknown, having only been studied in the short term’.   

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  • How to make Grilled Peaches with Fresh Mozzarella
  • These delicious chocolate chip cookies are dairy and gluten-free
  • This five-fruit slush will be the best drink you make all summer
  • How to make Grilled Veggie Pizza with Fresh Mozzarella
  • On the Grill: Shrimp
  • On the Grill: Burgers
  • How to make a perfect poached egg in less than 2 minutes
  • How to make Salad Topped Pizza Bites
  • How to make ice cream using a plastic bag
  • Recipe: How to make Broccoli Cheddar Bites
  • Get grilling: Baby Back Ribs
  • We baked cookies with an Amazon Echo and Google Home
  • Whip up some Crab Cakes Benedict with Florentine Hollandaise
  • Unicorn Noodles are the next big food trend
  • The simple trick to making an extra-crispy grilled cheese
  • How to make New Orleans-style beignets
  • How to make ginger-chocolate chunk ice cream sandwiches
  • Twinkies cappuccinos are now a thing
  • How to make fish kelaguen
  • Want to cook meat perfectly? Try sous vide
  • Want to make the perfect scrambled eggs?
  • Katoi sous chef Cameron Rolka sizzles up shrimp fried rice
  • Ham  Cheese Sliders
  • Triple Berry Crumble recipe
  • Healthier cookies: Chocolate Chip and Pecan Cookies recipe
  • How to cook a standing rib roast
  • Whisked: Sweet Potato Sensation Baking Demonstration
  • Cook perfect, silk-free corn on the cob
  • Forest recipe: Feta  Brussels Sprouts Salad
  • How to make Chartreuse's Mushroom Ricotta
  • Kalamata Olive Baklava recipe
  • Cooking with Sue: How to evenly cook chicken breast

Do you want to lose weight?

Do you want to get off daily medications?

Dr. Neal Barnard says he can help.

Think chickpeas over chicken, peppers over pepperoni pizza, kale over kielbasa. And while you’re at it, skip the cheese; it’s addicting.

Barnard, a vegan for more than 30 years, is a well-known advocate for adopting a plant-based way of eating. He maintains that a plant-based diet is the path to optimum health and a way to combat, and in some cases, reverse, chronic conditions like heart disease and diabetes.

More: Vegan ice cream? Try it, you’ll love it!

Over the years, Barnard has conducted and participated in several nutritional studies, including one about controversies explaining why trendy foods items like coconut oil, green juice and gluten-free “wear health halos instead of delivering real heart-health benefits, like nutrient-dense, plant-based foods.”

Barnard will make a stop in Detroit on Wednesday and Thursday to convey that message as part of a 10-city tour to kick off a 21-Day Kickstart Challenge to follow a plant-based diet.

Barnard is a psychiatrist with a focus on nutrition research. He’s the founder of Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM), and author of more than 18 books on health and wellness, including his most recent “The Cheese Trap” (Grand Central Life Style, $27). The PCRM is a nonprofit that advocates for preventative medicine and higher standard for research.

It was 30 years ago that Barnard became vegan after working as an autopsy assistant and seeing the affects of certain foods on health.

“I did two things that year: I was a smoking omnivore that threw out the Merit Menthols and threw out my Velveta, too, and never looked back,” Barnard says.

The 64-year-old Washington, D.C.-based doctor will be at the Chass Clinic in southwest Detroit on Wednesday for a presentation announcing the kick-off of the challenge.

Barnard says he choose to start the effort in Detroit because we need the help.

More: Please, no more downtown Detroit burger restaurants

The adult obesity rate in Michigan is 31.2%, up from 22.1% in 2000, according to a September 2016 report from the State of Obesity: Better Policies for a Healthier America from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

“The health indicators are not good. There’s a lot of obesity and a lot of type 2 diabetes,” Barnard says. “It doesn’t make it unique because frankly, that’s true of the entire civilized world. But Detroit is right up there.”

Barnard also sees Detroit as a leadership city and says its where many things get started and spread elsewhere. “We also have some terrific boots on the ground there,” he says.

At Chass Clinic, Barnard will be joined by Marc Ramirez, a former University of Michigan football player. Ramirez, 50, and an ATT operations manager, switched to a plant-based diet more than five years ago.

On Thursday, Barnard will visit the Motor City Health Fest in the Eastern Market area in Detroit. Billboards are up around town about the event, touting “Eat more fruits and vegetables” and “cut the dairy and meat.” There, he will join Rameriz and Dr. Joel Kahn, a local cardiologist and owner of GreenSpace Cafe in Ferndale, and other support groups and plant-based diet experts.

“After being sick for a decade, taking pills and getting worse, in 2 months, I’m off my insulin shots and all Metformin pills and in three months, I lost 50 pounds,” Ramirez says.

Ramirez also dropped 50 pounds within those first few months. Ramirez has a long family history of diabetes. Of his eight siblings, only one sister does not have diabetes, a disease that affects millions of Americans.

Ramirez and his wife, Kim, are certified Food for Life Instructors by PCRM. They founded Chickpea and Bean, which offers plant-based lifestyle seminars and cooking classes.

“Today at 50, I’m the oldest I’ve ever been and in the best shape of my life. How does that happen when at 43 I was so sick?” Ramirez says.

In April, Ramirez launched a 21-Day KickStart program in Macomb County. Nearly 100 people took the challenge of following a plant-based diet for three weeks. The group averaged an 8-pound weight-loss within those 21 days. And among the 74 people who participated in blood tests, Rameriz says, there was a 15% drop in LDLs (the bad cholesterol), and good cholesterol (HDL) went up 8%.

Barnard’s 21-day Kickstart pilot program started in 2009. Barnard said 500,000 to 600,000 people have done it worldwide. The program is available in many languages, too.

Two things happen, Barnard says, when people do the challenge: They lose weight and blood sugars improve.

“Apart from the physical benefits that they are experiencing, their tastes are changing in a way they didn’t forecast. They all say I used to be a cheese-aholic, but no, it’s not calling my name so much.”

Barnard says when switching to a plant-based diet, the average weight loss is a pound a week, “which is slow and steady, but there’s 52 weeks in a year, and it become effectively a one way street and very healthy direction.”

If you want to know more

Dr. Neal Barnard will make an appearance at these metro area events:

■ The Plant Based Nutrition Support Group will host Barnard at its meeting Tuesday at Seaholm High School in Birmingham. Doors open at 5:30 and the event presentation begins at 6:30. Barnard will sign copies of his latest book “The Cheese Trap” which will also be on sale. Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the door. For tickets go to: www.pbnsg.org.

■ 21-Day Kickstart Kick-off: noon -1 p.m. Wednesday at Community Health and Social Services (CHASS) Center, 5635 W. Fort Street, Detroit. To reserve at seat, call 313-849-3920, ext. 5163. The event is free and open to the public.

■ Motor City Health Fest: 6-9:30 p.m. Thursday at the Eastern (in the Eastern Market area), 3434 Russell St., Detroit. At the health fest, there will be a screening of the film “Forks Over Knives,” which looked at how following a plant-based diet may ward off chronic diseases like cancer and heart disease. There will be free health screenings, nutritional information, food samples and cooking demonstrations.

About 21-day kickstart

This program started by Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine includes a 21-day meal plan, weekly meetings, Webcasts, an app that gives you a meal plan with photos, directions, ingredients and nutrition facts for all meals and snacks and demonstrations by Food for Life instructors.

Stir-Fry Vegetable Salad with Asian Dressing

Stir-Fry Vegetable Salad with Asian Dressing

Serves: 6 / Preparation time: 15 minutes / Total time: 45 minutes

Serve this salad warm or cold. You won’t use all the dressing. It keeps for 2 weeks and can be used in stir-fries and other salads.

1 package fresh Chinese noodles, optional. Look for fresh Chinese-style noodles in the produce department.

DRESSING

1 1/2cups low-sodium soy sauce

1 2-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and chopped

1 bunch green onion (about 6, white and green parts), chopped

4 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed

1 tablespoon sesame oil

Juice of 1 lime

1 tablespoon agave nectar (or to taste)

1 tablespoon cornstarch, mixed with 1/2 cup cold water

SALAD

1 tablespoon canola oil

12 ounces shiitake mushrooms, stems removed, sliced about 1/4-inch thick

2 large carrots, peeled, julienned

1 red bell pepper, cored, seeded, julienned

1/2 head green cabbage, finely shredded

3 baby choy sum or baby bok choy, cut into 1-inch pieces

1 cup frozen shelled edamame

1 bunch green onions (about 6, green parts only)

1 cup chopped cilantro

1 bunch mint, chopped

1/2 cup sliced or slivered almonds, lightly toasted

If serving the salad over Chinese noodles, cook them according to package directions. Drain and set aside.

To make the dressing: Place all the dressing ingredients in a saucepan and bring to just a boil and then reduce heat to low. Simmer over low heat for about 10-15 minutes. The dressing will thicken just a little. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. When completely cool, strain the dressing into a glass measuring cup or jar (discarding solids) and refrigerate until ready to use. If not using right away, strain the dressing into a jar that has a tight-fitting lid and refrigerate up to 2 weeks.

To make the salad: In a large skillet or wok, heat the oil. Add the mushrooms and sauté until just soft and tender. Add the carrots, red pepper and cabbage and sauté about 1 minute. Add the choy sum, edamame and green onion and sauté 2 minutes. Remove from the heat. Add the cilantro and mint and toss to incorporate. Drizzle with about 1/3 cup or more of the dressing. Serve over noodles with additional dressing on the side. Garnish with almonds.

Adapted from “Vegan Cooking for Carnivores” by Roberto Martin (Grand Central Publishing, $29.99).

Tested by Susan M. Selasky for the Free Press Test Kitchen. Analysis includes noodles and 1/2cup of the dressing and almonds.

333 calories (30% from fat), 12 grams fat (1 gram sat. fat), 47 grams carbohydrates, 13 grams protein, 908 mg sodium, 5 mg cholesterol, 7 grams fiber.

 

Vegan Linguine with Shiitake Cream Sauce

Vegan Linguine with Shiitake Cream Sauce

Serves: 6 / Preparation time: 10 minutes / Total time: 30 minutes

According to the Vegetarian Times, Mark Reinfield, author of several vegan cookbooks, “revamps a classic Italian recipe, replacing clams with a combination of shiitake mushrooms and arame, a sea vegetable available in the Asian food aisle of supermarkets.”

12 ounces dry linguine

2 tablespoons arame, optional

2 tablespoons olive oil

6 cloves garlic, peeled, minced (about 2 tablespoons)

3 cups fresh shiitake mushrooms, stemmed and cut into 1/2-inch cubes

1/2 cup dry white wine

1 1/2 tablespoons lemon juice

1 1/2 cups unsweetened soy, rice or macadamia nut milk

3 tablespoons nutritional yeast

2 tablespoons Earth Balance margarine, optional

1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes

3 tablespoons fresh flat-leaf parsley, finely chopped

4 teaspoons pine nut or walnuts, chopped and toasted

Cook pasta in boiling, salted water according to package directions. Reserve about 1 cup of the cooking water. Drain the pasta. Meanwhile, if using arame soak it in 1/2 cup hot water.

Meanwhile, in large skillet heat the oil over medium heat. Add garlic and cook 1 minute, stirring constantly. Add mushrooms, wine and lemon juice; sauté 5 minutes, adding about 1/4 cup of the reserved pasta cooking water (if needed) to prevent sticking.

Reduce the heat and add soy milk, nutritional yeast, margarine (if using), red pepper flakes and arame with soaking liquid; season with salt and pepper, if desired. Cook 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Divide linguine among 4 plates, top with shiitakes and sauce, and garnish with parsley and pine nuts.

Tested by Susan M. Selasky for the Free Press Test Kitchen.

386 calories (21% from fat), 9 grams fat (1 gram sat. fat), 65 grams carbohydrates, 16 grams protein, 114 mg sodium, 0 mg cholesterol, 5 grams fiber.

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Weight loss: How to lose weight fast by adding THIS food to your diet plan

Dawn Jackson Blatner, R.D., author of The Flexitarian Diet, said: “The fat in yogurt contains conjugated linoleic acid, which can help you stay lean.”

She also said study after study shows a direct link between fibre and weight loss.

Losing weight is not all about diet – new research, conducted by the University of Leeds, has shown that adults who get six hours or less sleep a night, or have poor sleep patterns, are more likely to be overweight, obese and have poor metabolic health.

The study, led by Dr Laura Hardie, Reader in Molecular Epidemiology at the University of Leeds involved 1,615 adults who reported how long they slept and kept records of food intake.

Mediterranean diet: A heart-healthy eating plan – News8000.com

timbowden/iStock





By Mayo Clinic News Network

If you’re looking for a heart-healthy eating plan, the Mediterranean diet might be right for you. The Mediterranean diet incorporates the basics of healthy eating — plus a splash of flavorful olive oil and perhaps even a glass of red wine — among other components characterizing the traditional cooking style of countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea.

Most healthy diets include fruits, vegetables, fish and whole grains, and limit unhealthy fats. While these parts of a healthy diet remain tried-and-true, subtle variations or differences in proportions of certain foods may make a difference in your risk of heart disease.

Benefits of the Mediterranean diet

Research has shown that the traditional Mediterranean diet reduces the risk of heart disease. In fact, an analysis of more than 1.5 million healthy adults demonstrated that following a Mediterranean diet was associated with a reduced risk of death from heart disease and cancer, as well as a reduced incidence of Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases.

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends the Mediterranean diet as an eating plan that can help promote health and prevent disease. And the Mediterranean diet is one your whole family can follow for good health.

Key components of the Mediterranean diet

The Mediterranean diet emphasizes:

Eating primarily plant-based foods, such as fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes and nuts

Replacing butter with healthy fats, such as olive oil

Using herbs and spices instead of salt to flavor foods

Limiting red meat to no more than a few times a month

Eating fish and poultry at least twice a week

Drinking red wine in moderation (optional)

The diet also recognizes the importance of being physically active, and enjoying meals with family and friends.

Focus on fruits, vegetables, nuts and grains

The Mediterranean diet traditionally includes fruits, vegetables and grains. For example, residents of Greece average six or more servings a day of antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables.

Grains in the Mediterranean region are typically whole grain and usually contain very few unhealthy trans fats, and bread is an important part of the diet. However, throughout the Mediterranean region, bread is eaten plain or dipped in olive oil — not eaten with butter or margarine, which contains saturated or trans fats.

Nuts are another part of a healthy Mediterranean diet. Nuts are high in fat, but most of the fat is healthy. Because nuts are high in calories, they should not be eaten in large amounts — generally no more than a handful a day. For the best nutrition, avoid candied or honey-roasted and heavily salted nuts.

Choose healthier fats

The focus of the Mediterranean diet isn’t on limiting total fat consumption, but rather on choosing healthier types of fat. The Mediterranean diet discourages saturated fats and hydrogenated oils (trans fats), both of which contribute to heart disease.

The Mediterranean diet features olive oil as the primary source of fat. Olive oil is mainly monounsaturated fat — a type of fat that can help reduce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels when used in place of saturated or trans fats. “Extra-virgin” and “virgin” olive oils (the least processed forms) also contain the highest levels of protective plant compounds that provide antioxidant effects.

Canola oil and some nuts contain the beneficial linolenic acid (a type of omega-3 fatty acid) in addition to healthy unsaturated fat. Omega-3 fatty acids lower triglycerides, decrease blood clotting, and are associated with decreased incidence of sudden heart attacks, improve the health of your blood vessels, and help moderate blood pressure. Fatty fish — such as mackerel, lake trout, herring, sardines, albacore tuna and salmon — are rich sources of omega-3 fatty acids. Fish is eaten on a regular basis in the Mediterranean diet.

What about wine?

The health effects of alcohol have been debated for many years, and some doctors are reluctant to encourage alcohol consumption because of the health consequences of excessive drinking. However, alcohol — in moderation — has been associated with a reduced risk of heart disease in some research studies.

The Mediterranean diet typically includes a moderate amount of wine, usually red wine. This means no more than 5 ounces (148 milliliters) of wine daily for women of all ages and men older than age 65 and no more than 10 ounces (296 milliliters) of wine daily for younger men. More than this may increase the risk of health problems, including increased risk of certain types of cancer.

If you’re unable to limit your alcohol intake to the amounts defined above, if you have a personal or family history of alcohol abuse, or if you have heart or liver disease, refrain from drinking wine or any other alcohol.

Putting it all together

The Mediterranean diet is a delicious and healthy way to eat. Many people who switch to this style of eating say they’ll never eat any other way. Here are some specific steps to get you started:

Eat your veggies and fruits — and switch to whole grains. A variety of plant foods should make up the majority of your meals. They should be minimally processed — fresh and whole are best. Include veggies and fruits in every meal and eat them for snacks as well. Switch to whole-grain bread and cereal, and begin to eat more whole-grain rice and pasta products. Keep baby carrots, apples and bananas on hand for quick, satisfying snacks. Fruit salads are a wonderful way to eat a variety of healthy fruit.

Go nuts. Nuts and seeds are good sources of fiber, protein and healthy fats. Keep almonds, cashews, pistachios and walnuts on hand for a quick snack. Choose natural peanut butter, rather than the kind with hydrogenated fat added. Try blended sesame seeds (tahini) as a dip or spread for bread.

Pass on the butter. Try olive or canola oil as a healthy replacement for butter or margarine. Lightly drizzle it over vegetables. After cooking pasta, add a touch of olive oil, some garlic and green onions for flavoring. Dip bread in flavored olive oil or lightly spread it on whole-grain bread for a tasty alternative to butter. Try tahini as a dip or spread for bread too.

Spice it up. Herbs and spices make food tasty and can stand in for salt and fat in recipes.

Go fish. Eat fish at least twice a week. Fresh or water-packed tuna, salmon, trout, mackerel and herring are healthy choices. Grill, bake or broil fish for great taste and easy cleanup. Avoid breaded and fried fish.

Rein in the red meat. Limit red meat to no more than a few times a month. Substitute fish and poultry for red meat. When choosing red meat, make sure it’s lean and keep portions small (about the size of a deck of cards). Also avoid sausage, bacon and other high-fat, processed meats.

Choose low-fat dairy. Limit higher fat dairy products, such as whole or 2 percent milk, cheese and ice cream. Switch to skim milk, fat-free yogurt and low-fat cheese.

Source: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/mediterranean-diet/art-20047801/

Lose 10lb in 10 days: Dreading the party season in case you can’t squeeze into your frock, a top nutritionist …

With December rapidly approaching, you have to start quickly if you want to fit into that sexy dress

With December rapidly approaching, you have to start quickly if you want to fit into that sexy dress

The festive season is almost upon us and if you’re planning to sparkle in sequins or sizzle in a little black dress you’ll want to look slim and healthy, writes Louise Atkinson.

With December just two days away, it’s easy to assume it’s too late to get a trimmer figure for those pre-Christmas parties. But thanks to a brilliant new diet concept, The Burn, brought to you exclusively by the Daily Mail, there’s still plenty of time.

You can even make significant changes before next weekend.

The Burn is an innovative set of easy-to-manage diet plans: a ten-day plan, five-day plan and three-day plan. Each enables you to shed pounds and transform your physique fast without hunger or an exhausting exercise regime.

Nutritionist Haylie Pomroy has worked with stars including Jennifer Lopez, Reese Witherspoon, Raquel Welch and Cher, who come to her desperate to be transformed for red carpet appearances just days away.

She’s confident you can shift 3lb if you’ve got only three days to spare and 5lb if you have five days. If you embark on the ten-day plan, she promises total body transformation and at least 10lb of weight loss.

What makes this programme different is that each plan zones in on the underlying reasons why you’re carrying extra weight, whether it’s out of kilter hormones (addressed in the ten-day plan), a sluggish gut (the five-day plan) or bloating caused by water retention (the three-day plan).

Today, we give you all the guidance you need to start the ten-day plan right away. On Monday, we’ll reveal the five-day plan and on Tuesday it’ll be the three-day plan.

All three programmes share a framework: a delicious home-made breakfast smoothie; rejuvenating teas that you sip throughout the day; and a comforting vegetable soup twice a day. In addition, there are delicious lunch and dinner options.

Because the diet plans are designed to target a specific physiological reason for stubborn excess weight, the food and recipes are subtly different for each.

But many of the ingredients will be in your store cupboard or can be picked up at the supermarket. Additionally, there are snacks and ‘super boosters’ (special ingredients, treatments and exercises) to enhance the effect of each diet.

One thing is for sure: you will lose weight and improve your health no matter which diet you choose.

Here Haylie Pomroy gets you started.

BURN AWAY THAT STUBBORN FAT

Today, we launch the ten-day diet, which works by resetting errant hormones. Hormones play a significant role in metabolism, establishing where fat sits around the body and how and when it’s burnt for fuel. When it comes to weight loss, the more that’s burnt for fuel the better!

But when hormonal imbalance occurs — due to stress, poor blood sugar control, lack of sleep, low levels of vitamin D or the hormonal upheaval women and men go through in middle age — extra weight is all too often the result.

The body uses fat cells to absorb hormones that are not broken down properly and to produce more hormones to try to regain balance. This causes a proliferation of fat cells and aggressive weight gain.

Scroll down for video 

Cher, pictured, has used Haylie Pomroy’s nutrition guide to squeeze into her daring on-stage outfits

IS YOUR WEIGHT GAIN HORMONAL?

To tell if you’re suffering from hormone weight gain, look for fat accumulating in unfamiliar places, such as around the ribcage, on your upper back, your outer thighs, knees and even ankles.

Other signs are PMS or irritating menopausal symptoms, unpredictable moods, carbohydrate cravings and the 3pm energy slump.

Reversing hormone weight gain can be incredibly difficult. This is where ordinary diets so often come unstuck — you may lose a little weight, but if your body is hormonally tuned to hang on to fat, all too often you’ll reach a plateau and no matter how hard you try, it can be impossible to shift any more. ‘You can juice, you can cleanse, you can diet all day long,’ says Haylie Pomroy. ‘But you have to be able to create the right balance of hormones in your body to regain your health and get weight loss started again.’

WHAT’S THE SCIENCE?

The smoothie, tea, soup and meal recipes are packed with natural ingredients known to support healthy liver, gallbladder and thyroid function because these hormone-balancing organs need to be happy in order to get hormone function back on track.

Though hormones are excreted from glands around the body it’s the liver that directs the whole hormonal show, while the thyroid plays a key role in deciding how your hormone system functions.

The smoothie ingredients — grapefruit, beetroot, kale, spinach, coconut oil and sunflower seeds — stimulate enzymes in the blood that break down fat by stimulating bile production in the gallbladder and liver.

The tea you sip throughout the day contains micronutrients found in limes, milk thistle, dandelion root and turmeric that support the liver and thyroid.

In ten days the plan aims to regulate hormone production and in so doing turn your body into a fat-burning machine, re-sculpting it into better shape.

Reece Witherspoon, pictured, is a celebrity follower of nutritionist Haylie Pomroy

YOUR THREE SECRET WEAPONS IN THE BATTLE TO LOSE WEIGHT  

The diet is built around three secret weapons – your breakfast smoothie, special cleansing tea and a nourishing soup. Here are the recipes for them and how they fit into your daily plan . . .

BREAKFAST SMOOTHIE: Drink within 30 minutes of waking up plus a cup of special tea (in place of ordinary tea or coffee).

MORNING SNACK: Cucumber and celery sticks; large glass of water.

LUNCH: Bowl of soup; cup of special tea; meal containing one protein, one vegetable and one healthy fat (from the shopping list, top right) or pick one of the delicious recipes (far right); piece of fruit.

AFTERNOON SNACK: Large glass of water.

DINNER: Bowl of soup; cup of special tea; delicious meal. The lunch and supper recipes are interchangeable as long as you stick to the recipes printed overleaf or create your own, with one protein, one veg and one healthy fat, but no fruit, from the list.

LATE-NIGHT SNACK: Kale chips (chopped kale tossed in a spritz of olive oil and a twist of salt, baked in the oven for 15 minutes); water or an extra cup of special tea.

BREAKFAST SMOOTHIE

Serves 1

Make fresh and drink within 30 minutes of waking at the same time each day.

40g/1½oz sunflower seeds

¼ raw beetroot, peeled

1 tbsp coconut oil

110ml/4 fl oz water

Handful of ice cubes

450g/16oz fresh spinach

225g/8oz kale

1 grapefruit or orange (peeled)

Blend the sunflower seeds, then add the remaining ingredients and whizz until smooth. Add a teaspoon of stevia (a natural sugar-free sweetener) or experiment with a drop of vanilla essence or a pinch of cinnamon to taste.

Plenty of water - at least 1.5 litres a day - is needed to successfully complete this diet 

Plenty of water – at least 1.5 litres a day – is needed to successfully complete this diet 

TEA

Makes 15 servings (enough for half the diet)

6 limes, halved

1 tbsp turmeric

14 detox tea bags containing milk thistle and dandelion root (try Dr Stuart’s Liver Detox tea bags, £2.19 from Holland Barrett and £1.88 from Asda)

4 litres/7 pints water

Squeeze limes into a large pot, add rinds and other ingredients. Bring to boil for two to five minutes then steep uncovered for one hour.

Alternatively, you can make a pot of tea each morning with two teabags, half a lime, sliced, and a large pinch of turmeric. Steep thoroughly before drinking. Store in fridge and heat as required. Sip as much as you like throughout day in place of tea or coffee.

SOUP

Makes 20 servings (enough for one person for a week)

1 ½ litres/2 ½ pints water

9 celery stalks, roughly chopped

900g/2lb green beans, chopped

6 garlic cloves

9 courgettes, diced

330g/11½oz button mushrooms

75g/21½oz parsley

1½ onions, coarsely chopped

Sea salt to taste

Place water, celery, green beans and garlic in a large casserole and cook for five minutes. Add courgettes, mushrooms, parsley and onions and cook for five to seven minutes, until tender. Cool then puree. When serving, dilute one cup of soup with one cup of water, then heat.

SNACKS

Unlimited celery/cucumber crudites, kale and mushrooms.

DRINK

1½-2 litres/2½-3½ pints of water a day.

Take your pic from these delicious meals and dreamy dinners to help you drop a dress size

CHICKEN AND AVOCADO WITH CREAMY COCONUT MANGO DRESSING

Serves 1

110g/4 oz boneless, skinless chicken breast

Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

1 tsp extra-virgin olive oil

450g/16oz baby spinach

225g/8oz watercress

¼ avocado, sliced

Chicken and avocado with creamy coconut and mango dressing, pictured, is simple to prepare and tasty 

FOR THE DRESSING

1 mango/peach/nectarine

2 tbsp coconut milk

1 tbsp fresh mint, chopped

2 tsp fresh lime juice

1/8 tsp lime zest

¼ tsp fresh ginger, grated

Pinch sea salt, black pepper and crushed red pepper flakes

Bash chicken breast with a rolling pin until flattened to 1cm thick and season on both sides with salt and pepper. Griddle or shallow fry in olive oil until cooked. Set aside.

In a large serving bowl, combine dressing ingredients.

Slice the chicken and add to the dressing, along with the spinach and watercress. Toss to coat evenly. Season with salt and black pepper to taste, and top with sliced avocado.

REFRESHING TUNA SALAD

Serves 1

170g/6oz can tuna in water, drained

50g/1 ¾ oz celery, finely chopped

40g/1 ½ oz green onion, finely chopped

3 tbsp hummus

1 tbsp plus ½ tsp lemon juice

Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

½ tbsp extra-virgin olive oil

150g/5oz romaine/cos lettuce, torn

75g/2½ oz mushrooms, sliced

2 tbsp fresh basil, chopped

1 orange, segmented

2 tbsp pine nuts

IN A small bowl, combine tuna, celery, green onion, hummus, 1 tbsp of lemon juice, salt and pepper. Mix well.

In a serving bowl, whisk together oil and remaining ½ tsp lemon juice. Add lettuce, mushrooms and 1 tbsp of basil to the dressing. Season with salt and pepper. Top with tuna salad, orange segments, pine nuts and remaining basil.

SCRUMPTIOUS EGG SALAD

Serves 1

2 hard-boiled eggs, chopped

75g/2½ oz celery, diced

1 tbsp spring onion, chopped

1 tbsp fresh parsley, finely chopped

1 tbsp hummus

1 tbsp Dijon mustard

½ tbsp fresh thyme leaves

Hard-boiled eggs, combined with spring onion, parsley, hummus and Dijon mustard 

Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

150g/5oz romaine/cos lettuce, torn

150g/5oz fennel bulb, thinly sliced

40g/1 ½ oz white mushrooms, sliced

1 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil

1 tsp balsamic vinegar

175g/6oz pomegranate seeds (or serve with a fruit)

In a small bowl, combine first eight ingredients. Mix well.

In a large serving bowl, toss lettuce, fennel and mushrooms with the oil and vinegar. Add salt and pepper to taste.

Top lettuce mixture with egg salad and sprinkle with pomegranate seeds (or serve with a fruit).

EXOTIC WATERCRESS POMEGRANATE SALAD

Serves 1

150g/5oz cabbage, sliced

50g/1 ¾ oz celery, sliced

2 tbsp spring onion, sliced

85g/3 oz hummus

Fresh mint to taste, chopped

Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper or tamari soy sauce, to taste

225g/8oz watercress or spinach

175g/6oz pomegranate seeds

25g/1oz walnuts or sunflower seeds

Combine cabbage, celery, spring onion, hummus, mint and salt and pepper. Mix well. Place watercress on a plate and top with cabbage mixture. Garnish with pomegranate seeds and walnuts.

ROSEMARY CHICKEN WITH ROASTED VEGETABLES

Serves 2

225g/8oz fresh beetroot, trimmed

2 small courgettes

2 celery stalks

1 small onion

Juice of ½ lemon

2 garlic cloves, chopped

2 tbsp grainy mustard

2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil

1½ tbsp rosemary, chopped

Sea salt and black pepper, to taste

2 chicken thighs, bone in, skin on

Rosemary chicken with roasted vegetables, pictured. takes only around 40 minutes to bake in the oven

Preheat oven to 230c. Cut beetroot, courgettes, celery and onion into 4cm/1½in chunks. In a large bowl, combine lemon juice, garlic, mustard, oil, rosemary, salt and pepper. Add chicken thighs, turning them to coat both sides, and set them aside on a plate.

Add chopped vegetables to bowl and toss to coat. Spread vegetables evenly on a baking dish. Bake uncovered for ten minutes.

Add chicken (skin side up) and bake uncovered for 40 minutes, or until chicken is browned and cooked through and vegetables are tender.

PAN-FRIED CHICKEN WITH FENNEL AND WALNUTS

Serves 2

225g/8 oz chicken breast

Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

1½ tbsp extra-virgin olive oil

2 medium fennel bulbs, sliced

1 small onion, sliced

2 tsp dried oregano

2 garlic cloves, minced

240ml/8 fl oz chicken stock

2 tsp balsamic vinegar

2 tbsp fresh basil, chopped

2 tbsp walnuts, crushed

Flatten chicken to 1cm thickness and season on both sides with salt and pepper. Griddle or fry in ½ tbsp oil until cooked through. Set aside to rest.

Add 1 tbsp oil to hot pan and add fennel, onion and oregano. Saute for five minutes, until onion and fennel begin to caramelise. Add garlic and saute for 30 seconds. Add stock, bring to the boil and cook for five minutes, until broth has evaporated.

Remove from heat, stir in vinegar and add salt and pepper to taste.

Slice chicken and serve over the vegetables, sprinkled with basil and walnuts.

ASIAN-STYLE CORIANDER PRAWNS AND GREEN BEANS

Serves 2

1 tbsp coconut oil

175g/6oz green beans, trimmed and cut into 5cm/2in pieces

2 small courgettes, thinly sliced

350g/12 oz raw prawns, shelled

40g/1½ oz spring onion, sliced

2 garlic cloves, minced

65ml/2 fl oz coconut milk

1 tbsp tamari soy sauce

2 tsp lime juice

1 tsp grated fresh ginger

½ tsp lime zest

Pinch red pepper flakes, crushed

3 tbsp fresh coriander, chopped

Heat coconut oil in a large, heavy frying pan over medium-high heat. Add green beans and stir-fry for one minute. Add courgette and stir-fry for two minutes. Add prawns, spring onion and garlic, and stir-fry for one minute, until prawns turn pink.

Add coconut milk, tamari, lime juice, ginger, lime zest and red pepper flakes. Continue to stir for five minutes, until prawns are cooked through and everything is hot. Remove from heat and serve topped with coriander.

Nutritionist Haylie Pomroy helps the likes of Jennifer Lopez, pictured, transform themselves in the days before they appear on the red carpet 

Nutritionist Haylie Pomroy helps the likes of Jennifer Lopez, pictured, transform themselves in the days before they appear on the red carpet 

DELICIOUS NO PASTRY VEGGIE QUICHE

Serves 2

2 large leeks, thinly sliced

1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

75g/2½ oz shiitake mushrooms, sliced

125g/4½ oz asparagus, trimmed, sliced diagonally into 5cm/2in pieces

450g/16 oz fresh spinach

2 tsp fresh thyme leaves

Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

4 large eggs

90ml/3 fl oz coconut milk

2 tbp fresh basil, chopped

Preheat oven to 175c. Rinse leeks and saute in oil with mushrooms for five minutes. Add asparagus and saute for four minutes, then add spinach and thyme. Stir until spinach wilts. Remove pan from heat, season with salt and pepper, and set aside to cool.

In a large bowl, whisk together eggs and coconut milk, another pinch of salt and a few cracks of pepper. Stir in the vegetable mixture.

Pour into a 23cm/9in pie plate and bake for 30 minutes, or until quiche is golden brown and puffed and the centre is set.

Let quiche rest for five minutes before slicing. Sprinkle with the basil before serving.

SPICY ROASTED CAULIFLOWER SALMON

Serves 2

2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil

Juice and zest of ½ lemon, plus 2 lemon wedges, for serving

2 garlic cloves, minced

3 tbsp fresh dill, chopped

Pinch red pepper flakes, crushed

Sea salt and black pepper, to taste

2 x 175g/6oz salmon fillets 1.3kg/3lb cauliflower florets

½ medium red onion, cut into eight wedges

Horseradish, to taste

Preheat the oven to 230c, to create this scrumptious salmon dish which is cooked in under 15 minutes

Preheat oven to 230c. In a small bowl, combine oil, lemon juice and zest, garlic, 2 tbsp of dill, red pepper flakes, salt and pepper. Brush fish with half of this mixture and set aside.

Toss cauliflower and onion with the remaining half of the oil mixture and spread on a baking sheet. Roast the vegetables for 15 mins, stir then place the salmon on top, skin side down. Bake for 12 to 15 mins more, or until the fillets are nearly opaque in the middle. Season again with salt and pepper; top with the remaining dill. Serve with horseradish and lemon wedges.

GREEK-STYLE BAKED COD WITH ARTICHOKES

Serves 2

½ medium red onion, cut into eight wedges

500g/17½oz courgettes, sliced

1 garlic clove, minced

2 tsp fresh thyme leaves

Pinch of sea salt 1 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil

400g/14oz can artichoke hearts, drained and quartered

8 Kalamata olives, chopped

Juice and zest of ½ lemon

2 x 175g/6oz cod fillets

Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

1 tbsp fresh parsley, chopped

Preheat oven to 230c. Saute the onion, courgettes, garlic, thyme and a generous pinch of salt in oil for five minutes, until crisp but tender. Remove from heat and stir in the artichoke hearts, olives, and lemon juice and zest. Season the cod fillets with salt and pepper and nestle them in the vegetable mixture. Bake uncovered for 15 minutes, until the cod is nearly opaque in the centre. Sprinkle with parsley and serve.

TRICKS TO BOOST YOUR FAT-BURNING AND KICK-START YOUR DIET  

INTENSIFY the effectiveness of the ten-day Burn by adding one of the following metabolism boosters each day:

BLACK PEPPER: Add liberal amounts to food (it increases internal heat and helps break down the stubborn white fat behind hormonal weight gain, especially when combined with turmeric in the special tea).

WET SOCK TREATMENT: Drench cotton socks in cold water, wring them out and put in the fridge for six to ten hours. Before bed, soak your feet in warm water (as hot as you can handle) for 15 minutes, dry and then put on the cold, wet socks from the fridge, cover with dry heavy wool socks and go straight to bed. The cold socks trigger a rush of blood to the feet, which puts your circulatory system on alert, stimulating your immune system. You will wake in the morning feeling refreshed and invigorated. While the outer socks may be damp, they won’t leave your bed sopping.

EXERCISE: Try 30 minutes of cardio one day (jogging, cycling, swimming, brisk walking), 20 minutes of strength training the next day (weight training or an exercise class) and 30 to 60 minutes of yoga or pilates on the third day. Repeat throughout the plan.

HEALTH WARNING: This diet may not be suitable if you are a child, teenager, pregnant or breastfeeding. If you have diabetes or any other medical condition or if you are taking medication, seek advice from your GP before embarking on any diet programme.

ADAPTED by Louise Atkinson from The Burn by Haylie Pomroy(Transworld, £12.99), published on January 1, 2015. To pre-order a copy for £9.75 (PP free for limited time), visit www.mailbookshop.co.uk. Offer valid until December 15, 2014. © Haylie Pomroy.