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Medical Weight Loss Expert Dr. Rao Weighs-in on Recent Diabetic …

CHARLESTON, WV–(Marketwired – December 06, 2016) – It’s well known that imbalances in blood sugar levels can impact an individual’s ability to maintain their weight. The 8-Week Blood Sugar Diet seeks to address this by offering a calorie-restricted dieting regimen for those who are either prediabetic or are currently suffering from Type-2 diabetes in order to slow the progression of, or even reverse these conditions. It consists of a low-carb, Mediterranean-style diet for eight weeks with intervals of intermittent fasting which vary in intensity depending upon the option chosen. Studies show that both the Mediterranean Diet and very low-calorie diets are optimal choices for fast weight loss as well as the reduction of diabetes and obesity risks.

However, Dr. Nishant Rao of Diet Doc Medical Weight loss urges individuals to be cautious when adopting diabetic weight loss diets that are calorie-restricted diets and/or require fasting. For diabetic patients in particular, medically unsupervised dieting could be an unsafe route, “Everyone does not fit into the same template for weight loss, and any lasting weight loss solution has to take into consideration each individual’s health condition, risk factors, lifestyle, age and gender.” In fact, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, advises that very low-calorie diets (VLCD’s) should not be performed on one’s own and requires close monitoring from professionals who are trained in medical weight loss.

Diet Doc, a national medical weight loss program, focuses on nutritionally balanced meal plans and provides exclusive weight loss products that help patients control blood sugar levels. Diet Doc patients report feelings of fullness and satisfaction, rather than deprivation. As a leader in the medical weight loss industry, they’ve combined decades of nutritional research with doctor-supervised weight loss programs. Over 97 percent of Diet Doc patients have regained their health and dropped excess weight rapidly, all while keeping diabetic conditions at bay. Diet Doc encourages individuals who have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes to call as soon as possible to schedule a personal, no-cost consultation with one of their certified nutritionists.

New Diet Doc patients can call or easily and effortlessly visit https://www.dietdoc.com to complete an initial comprehensive, yet simple, health questionnaire and schedule an immediate personal, no-cost consultation. Diet Doc Physicians all received specialized training in nutritional science and fast weight loss. Diet Doc reviews each patient’s health history to create a personalized diet plan geared for fast weight loss, or that addresses life-long issues causing weight loss to slow down or stop. Nutritionists work personally with each patient and use their own algorithm to craft meal and snack plans that are compatible with each patient’s age, gender, activity level, food preferences, nutritional needs and medical conditions. They combine these state of the art diet plans with pure, prescription diet products that enable their patients to resist the temptation to reach for sugary snacks, eliminate fatigue and curb the appetite. Over 97% of Diet Doc patients report incredible weight loss results with the majority losing 20 or more pounds per month.

At Diet Doc, all patients gain unlimited access to the best minds in the business. Their staff of doctors, nurses, nutritionists and coaches are available 6 days per week to answer questions, offer suggestions, address concerns and lend their professional guidance and support. Because of this, more and more people are turning to Diet Doc for their weight management needs. Diet plans are tailored to be specific to the needs of those of any age, gender, shape or size and for those who are struggling to lose that final 10-20 pounds to those who must lose 100 pounds or more. Call today to request a private, confidential, no-cost online consultation.

About the Company:

Diet Doc Weight Loss is the nation’s leader in medical, weight loss offering a full line of prescription medication, doctor, nurse and nutritional coaching support. For over a decade, Diet Doc has produced a sophisticated, doctor designed weight loss program that addresses each individual specific health need to promote fast, safe and long term weight loss.

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DietDocMedical

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DietDocMedicalWeightLoss/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/diet-doc-weight-loss?trk=biz-brand-tree-co-logo

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Foods 12 Victoria’s Secret angels cut out of their diet before the show

Becoming a Victoria’s Secret Angel is no easy task. While the models are the continually thinking about their diet and exercise regime, the VS fashion show is the one show they all look forward to.

We might have a pre-conceived notion about models and their diets, but these Angels have a healthy take on fueling their bodies in preparation for the show. A common theme — eat what you want and take everything in moderation.

Scroll through to see the foods the Angels cut out :

The Brazilian bombshell, Alessandra Ambrosio revealed to Net-A-Porter that she doesn’t really diet. Her only weakness is Brazilian food. 

“I don’t cut out any food groups. I’m all about moderation and eating something different every day. Obviously I try not to splurge on pasta, but if I’m back in Brazil where everything is pasta- or bread-based — and so yummy — I’ll eat whatever I want, then go back to lots of salads and chicken or fish with vegetables as soon as I’m back in LA.”

Lily Aldridge is a VS Fashion Show veteran. She knows what works for her and what doesn’t. Lily has one major thing she takes out of her diet before the show. 

“The big thing I cut out is wine. And then a week before the show, I stop salty foods,” Aldridge told The Daily Mail

Hadid knows food and she’s confident about her mentality when it comes to dieting. 

“Eat clean, and work out to stay fit — and have a burger to stay sane,” she told Refinery 29.

Elsa Hosk is another toned angel who loves working out. She’s not a snacker though — she’s more of a three meals a-day kind of girl.

“I don’t usually snack at all. I have main meals, and I make sure I eat a lot so I survive to the next meal,” she told Harper’s Bazaar. “I generally always eat what I want. I think when you work out a lot, you can afford to eat more because your body’s metabolism is higher. I like healthy food and prefer that anyways, but if I want pizza or a can of Coca-Cola every once in a while I’m going to have it. I just try to have a few slices and that’s it.” 

Jasmine Tookes is a strong and toned angel. We tried eating like her for a week and it was surprisingly easy because she mainly sticks to protein and vegetables. She also doesn’t change her diet before a show.

“I think balance is so important and I like to be able to eat what I want. I still have my pizza and burgers and when I’m training hard, I eat a lot of protein, like chicken,” Jasmine Tookes told Elle.

Martha Hunt has the right mentality when it comes to eating. She recognizes that we all have our weaknesses and that it’s important to give your body what it wants.

“I think everyone’s relationship with food is all about giving your body what it wants and what it needs. I think indulging is good and working out too for sure!” Martha Hunt said to Self.

Kendall Jenner is taking the Victoria’s Secret runway for a second year int a row. Khloe Kardashian revealed what her sisters eat in a day and says most of her sisters diets are cray — but Kendall is her main chick when it comes to food.

“People always find it funny that Kenny is on the anti-model diet,” she wrote on her blog. “She loves burgers and pizza and goes to In-N-Out all the time. Kendall is my go-to girl on cheat day!”

Romee Strijd’s Instagram shows that she’s all about health and fitness. She credits clean eating and an active lifestyle to her physique. 

“Before a show, I try to stay away from processed foods,” Romee told Cosmopolitan. “I feel better when I eat healthy stuff.”

Sara Sampaio is one of the newer angels who is also a foodie. She told Vogue that it’s all about balance. Oh, and that her genetics help her out.

“I don’t restrict myself from any food in my diet; I think it’s all about balance. I’m also very lucky with my genetics and metabolism,” Sara Sampaio explained. 

She also told Vogue that 72 hours before a big shoot she doesn’t change her diet that much, but she “might cut back on sweets like Skittles.”

Victoria’s Secret Angel, Doutzen Kroes had an interesting situation during the 2014 fashion show — she was breast feeding. She couldn’t restrict her diet too much, but she did tell Hello! that she ditched sugary food.

“I just made sure to cut out all the bad foods, like sweets and chocolate, because that’s not good for the baby anyway.”

Karlie Kloss won’t be walking in this year’s Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show. Apparently, she has other work obligations. The 6’1″ fitness model divulged to People that she turned her diet around in her late teens.

“I stopped eating goldfish and Oreos and started eating kale salads and avocado toast,” said Kloss. “It changed my energy. I realized, Okay, how I eat affects how I feel.”

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Medical Weight Loss Expert Dr. Rao Weighs-in on Recent Diabetic Diet Plans

CHARLESTON, WV–(Marketwired – December 06, 2016) – It’s well known that imbalances in blood sugar levels can impact an individual’s ability to maintain their weight. The 8-Week Blood Sugar Diet seeks to address this by offering a calorie-restricted dieting regimen for those who are either prediabetic or are currently suffering from Type-2 diabetes in order to slow the progression of, or even reverse these conditions. It consists of a low-carb, Mediterranean-style diet for eight weeks with intervals of intermittent fasting which vary in intensity depending upon the option chosen. Studies show that both the Mediterranean Diet and very low-calorie diets are optimal choices for fast weight loss as well as the reduction of diabetes and obesity risks.

However, Dr. Nishant Rao of Diet Doc Medical Weight loss urges individuals to be cautious when adopting diabetic weight loss diets that are calorie-restricted diets and/or require fasting. For diabetic patients in particular, medically unsupervised dieting could be an unsafe route, “Everyone does not fit into the same template for weight loss, and any lasting weight loss solution has to take into consideration each individual’s health condition, risk factors, lifestyle, age and gender.” In fact, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, advises that very low-calorie diets (VLCD’s) should not be performed on one’s own and requires close monitoring from professionals who are trained in medical weight loss.

Diet Doc, a national medical weight loss program, focuses on nutritionally balanced meal plans and provides exclusive weight loss products that help patients control blood sugar levels. Diet Doc patients report feelings of fullness and satisfaction, rather than deprivation. As a leader in the medical weight loss industry, they’ve combined decades of nutritional research with doctor-supervised weight loss programs. Over 97 percent of Diet Doc patients have regained their health and dropped excess weight rapidly, all while keeping diabetic conditions at bay. Diet Doc encourages individuals who have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes to call as soon as possible to schedule a personal, no-cost consultation with one of their certified nutritionists.

New Diet Doc patients can call or easily and effortlessly visit https://www.dietdoc.com to complete an initial comprehensive, yet simple, health questionnaire and schedule an immediate personal, no-cost consultation. Diet Doc Physicians all received specialized training in nutritional science and fast weight loss. Diet Doc reviews each patient’s health history to create a personalized diet plan geared for fast weight loss, or that addresses life-long issues causing weight loss to slow down or stop. Nutritionists work personally with each patient and use their own algorithm to craft meal and snack plans that are compatible with each patient’s age, gender, activity level, food preferences, nutritional needs and medical conditions. They combine these state of the art diet plans with pure, prescription diet products that enable their patients to resist the temptation to reach for sugary snacks, eliminate fatigue and curb the appetite. Over 97% of Diet Doc patients report incredible weight loss results with the majority losing 20 or more pounds per month.

At Diet Doc, all patients gain unlimited access to the best minds in the business. Their staff of doctors, nurses, nutritionists and coaches are available 6 days per week to answer questions, offer suggestions, address concerns and lend their professional guidance and support. Because of this, more and more people are turning to Diet Doc for their weight management needs. Diet plans are tailored to be specific to the needs of those of any age, gender, shape or size and for those who are struggling to lose that final 10-20 pounds to those who must lose 100 pounds or more. Call today to request a private, confidential, no-cost online consultation.

About the Company:

Diet Doc Weight Loss is the nation’s leader in medical, weight loss offering a full line of prescription medication, doctor, nurse and nutritional coaching support. For over a decade, Diet Doc has produced a sophisticated, doctor designed weight loss program that addresses each individual specific health need to promote fast, safe and long term weight loss.

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DietDocMedical

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DietDocMedicalWeightLoss/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/diet-doc-weight-loss?trk=biz-brand-tree-co-logo

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How to stick to a healthy diet during the holidays | Fox17

It’s a well known fact that people, on average, gain five to ten pounds from over-eating during the holiday season. With sugary treats around the house in addition to added stress and lack of time,getting out to exercise or eating healthy can be hard.

Donna Welch, a Health Educator at Mercy Health Weight Management, came onto the Morning Mix to share the do’s and don’ts for holiday parties so you don’t become part of the statistic:

Plan ahead- On the days leading up to a party, plan meals that are low in calories and involve lots of physical activity.

Don’t skip meals- On the day before the party, don’t skip meals so you can “save calories.” Stick with a regular healthy eating routine.

Eat a healthy meal beforehand- Right before you leave for the party, eat a healthy snack to take the edge off the hunger. When you put yourself in a social situation where there’s a lot of high-calorie foods, it’s easier to walk away if your stomach is full.

Increase physical activity- Plan an extra walk or two on the days leading up to the party. Increasing physical activity will raise your metabolism, and that will help you burn more calories.

Bring a low-calorie dish- Offer to bring a low-calorie dish to the party. This way you’ll know there will be at least one healthy option for you, as well as others, looking for a healthy choice or are watching their weight.

If you overeat, don’t get discouraged or worry, get back on track by reducing your calories for a few days later that week and add in some extra exercise.

 At Mercy Health Weight Management, they offer their HMR program. The program helps people lose weight by replacing their meals and snacks with HMR shakes, entrees, and snacks. By mixing in vegetables and fruits with HMR meal replacements, they leave you feeling full of nutrients.

To learn more about the HMR program offered through Mercy Health, visit MercyHealthWeightManagement.com.

Will Fasting To Lose Weight Work For Me? Pros And Cons; What Intermittent Fasting Feels Like

Quora Quora .

This question originally appeared on Quora. Answer by Darren Beattie.

Is intermittent fasting (IF) a good idea for weight loss? It can help with dietary adherence in some folks and probably help them manage or at least learn about hunger sensations.

It’s not for everybody though, you should probably experiment with different variations of it and consider it after making some key basic nutritional adjustments. It doesn’t suit everyone’s lifestyle but it might suit yours.

It can only create fat loss the same way any other eating strategy does, via an energy deficit.

I think it’s first necessary to recognize that the majority of us naturally fast 12-14 hours per day already during our sleep.

Then we need to establish some ground rules about Intermittent Fasting as there are numerous methods.

  1. 24 Hour Fasts (Once or Twice per Week)
  2. Alternate Day Method (Eat Every Other Day)
  3. 16 Hour Fast Method (popularized by Martin Berkhan at Lean Gains )
  4. 20 Hour Fast Method (popularized by the Ori Hofmekler’s Warrior Diet)
  5. Religious Fasting (period fasting as related to religious practices)

Probably others…

IF has become all the rage recently because it has some good evidence pointing in the direction of fat loss in particular. However, it’s important to keep in mind that there is actually very little research in this field (no one wants to fund not eating).

It has never really been shown to be any more effective for fat loss (AKA weight loss) than simple caloric restriction when calories are accounted for directly (i.e. not personal recall, which is always inaccurate). Which makes perfect sense from a physiological stand point because you can’t defy the laws of physics just by eating only at a certain time.

When IF does seem more effective for fat loss it’s probably just because it creates a calorie restriction in certain people and frankly people who don’t have success with a strategy just don’t rave about it as much as people who do.

A colleague, Dr. John Berardi, wrote a great (and free) book on the subject a few years back. Based on his experience and did an little experiment on himself utilizing blood work. You can read it here: PN-IF

What you may note is looking at the health markers of this case study, not a lot actually changed for him (though he did get leaner), presumably because before he started fasting he already had a solid foundation of eating healthfully. Now this isn’t a formal study, so a lot of variables haven’t be accounted for.

In a great deal of nutrition research I’ve plowed through over the years inducing a change from a test subjects ‘normal’ (in this case taking someone out of their usual diet routine) diet in pretty much any way yields significant changes in various health markers. Though not necessarily weight (again an energy deficit needs to be present for weight loss or more specifically fat loss to occur).

What this case study suggests to me is that giving yourself a feeding window or a fasting window doesn’t really create much of a change outside of the existing diet. When people do get dramatic changes, it’s probably more related to the fact that doing IF caused a more dramatic shift in their eating and potentially training habits.

For instance, training is a significant part of the lean gains protocol.

Sound eating habits and a generally sound diet, utilizing foundational eating skills like these (disclaimer, my blog – Eating for Fat Loss – Skill Based Fitness will probably yield better health marker changes by comparison assuming that in doing IF you do not change any of your current habits of eating, you simply cut out food for an extended period of time. Of course the fat loss that occurs with a skill based approach is still the result of creating an energy deficit.

In my opinion developing these habits (and there are potentially others) is the first step or foundational step in eating as a generalized consideration (more veggies, better/more lean protein, enough healthy fats and carbs to match training/exercise requirements).

Meaning, if you plan to try IF (as I’ve read of many people doing unfortunately) with your current diet of simple carbohydrates, sweets, and other nutrient-free calories, you will probably not get the results you are looking for. Or you may get the results you are looking for but with a disregard for the possible health outcomes down the road.

I would warn that IF is not an excuse to eat whatever you want at re-feed times and that assuming it to be a miraculous cure for low body fat would be a mistake. Many people appear to treat it as such.

The real benefits of IF appear to be:

  • Individual adherence (i.e. an eating strategy that works for the individual)
  • Probably helps suppress/manage hunger and/or recognize hunger cues better

Meaning that if fasting helps you achieve an energy deficit and your goal is weight loss, then great, dietary adherence is probably the most crucial thing to consider in any eating strategy.

It also appears effective at teaching/managing/mitigating hunger sensations (at least in certain people). And well hunger usually accompanies energy restriction, so anything a person can do to manage hunger effectively can really help a person lose fat. If you’re better at recognizing when you’re really hungry, then you can probably manage a real energy restriction better.

Note that there are many other ways to manage hunger too, like increasing protein, so it’s really about finding something that works for you.

It might not be a great strategy if you:

  • Want to gain weight/muscle (though the lean gains approach certainly has some history here, so if you can create an energy surplus with a restricted feeding window by all means – some people use it to some success to gain muscle slower and reduce the amount of fat that generally comes with weight gain)
  • Have a history of disordered eating you might want to consider something else (along with getting the necessary help)

Fasting for weight loss fundamentally works like any other form of caloric restriction. For any evidence I’ve read showing positive changes in health markers we do not know for sure if these are not more directly related to the caloric restriction than anything else.

Caloric restriction has been shown to increase longevity and improve many health markers.

There is some other evidence I’ve read revealing that there are also possible downsides to certain health markers to go with the good changes. It’s a mixed bag and hard to determine.

As a coach who’s played with a few types of IF it personally did not appeal to me as it may to you. I have used various types successfully with certain clients though. I often go through a 1–2 week experiment with clients to give them an appreciation for what real hunger is. I do not like the sensation of purposefully putting off eating as it didn’t jive with my social life, my sports performance or when I genuinely do feel hungry (sometimes I would cut my planned fast short because of this…). For other people it works with their schedule, their training schedule, their lifestyle, etc…

I also have some general concerns about it’s use with certain individuals in that it can create an odd relationship with food and may for instance encourage or lead to eating disorders but the research on that is also a bit of a mixed bag.

Too much caloric restriction can mean just as much malnutrition as it can longevity, and in my opinion could hinder your quality of life (even if it becomes longer).

Based on this, I generally consider Intermittent Fasting (IF), as more of an intermediate to advanced nutritional strategy for weight loss for most folks. I prefer to start more simply (with strategies listed above) and build up to something like this. It won’t be any better than any diet solution for many, particularly without good nutrition already in place. It would still have to create an energy deficit for fat loss.

I would also say that IF is more appropriately used as a short-term strategy that helps already lean people, get more lean. What some people in the bodybuilding community refer to as ‘cutting.’ You know, you’ve been hovering just above 10% body fat, and you want to get below that so you can do a photo-shoot with your abs pulsating, that kind of thing. It just clicks with certain people too.

Ultimately, if you are doing the majority of those things especially well already, but still not getting where you’d like to then IF may be something worthwhile to experiment with. It has some merits, most of which I believe are more hunger/lifestyle related as opposed to weight-loss specific, but a lot of the time that’s all a person needs to get over the plateau.

I would encourage you to think of IF as just a tool (like in my opinion Calorie Counting, Nutrient Timing, or Carb Cycling is) you can use from time to time, once you’ve developed some quality eating habits. Simply doing IF on it’s own with no consideration as to what you are ingesting would be a waste of time in my opinion.

The timing doesn’t matter as much as what that restricted feeding window ultimately does. If you overeat in 8 hours, it has the same effect as over eating in a 12 hour window = weight gain. The same goes for under eating = weight loss.

I would start with the Lean Gains  approach (pretty much skipping breakfast) as it’s the least daunting of those listed and then work towards adding hours.

The Warrior Diet is a 20 hour fasting method, whereby you can consume small amounts of veggie shakes to reduce hunger during your fast (among many other dietary suggestions).

For info on the Warrior Diet or Method of IF, check out Ori Hofmekler’s website at The Warrior Diet.

For the longer 24 hour fasting method(s) you can also check out the book, “Eat, Stop, Eat” by Brad Pilon.

Each has their own merit, but usually based around the adherence/hunger factors for people. I found going an entire day without food challenging, let alone doing it weekly, which would help me stick with it right? The more moderate methods worked more effectively for me personally, but I’m not you. So don’t do anything that you can’t/won’t stick with, it won’t help you in the long run.

Whatever you choose to do, I encourage you to experiment with it and gauge how it makes you feel and operate.

More from Quora:

  • Is it healthy to fast for one day per week?
  • Is it okay to work out in the morning and skip breakfast then go to work?
  • Can I do intermittent fasting 6 days a week?

 

Is Butter Good Or Bad? Saturated Fat Foods In High-Fat Diet May Boost ‘Good’ Cholesterol

Nutritional dogma has taught us “saturated fat is bad.” We’ve limited or completely avoided high-fat foods like meats, butter, and other full-fat dairy products to maintain our heart health. Now, researchers at the University of Bergen in Norway suggest (yet again) that a diet high in saturated fat may boost “good” (HDL) cholesterol. 

“The very high intake of total and saturated fat did not increase the calculated risk of cardiovascular diseases,” said Ottar Nygård, study author, professor, and cardiologist, in a statement.

Previous research has extensively explored the controversial debate surrounding saturated fats, in particular butter. In June, a Tufts University study found little to no association with chronic disease, or as an all-cause mortality. Butter consumption was found to be small or insignificant with total mortality, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. The researchers cautioned butter shouldn’t be either demonized or considered “back” as a way to good health.

Read More: Can Butter Be Part Of A Healthy Diet?

Last month, Harvard University researchers found a five percent higher intake of fats in foods like butter or red meat was linked with a 25 percent increased risk of coronary heart disease. This suggests we should replace saturated fatty acids with healthier unsaturated fats from vegetable oils, nuts, seeds, and seafood as well as high-quality carbohydrates.

In the new study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers found dietary fat, particularly saturated fat, had a profound effect on cardiometabolic risk factors, including ectopic fat storage, blood pressure, blood lipids (triglycerides), insulin, and blood sugar.  

The researchers randomly selected a total of 38 men with abdominal obesity to follow a dietary pattern high in either carbohydrates or fat, of which half was saturated. Both groups had similar intakes of energy, proteins, polyunsaturated fatty acids, with the food types being the same, but varying in quantity, and the intake of added sugar was minimized. Researchers also observed the effects of total and saturated fat in the context of a healthy diet rich in fresh, low processed and nutritious foods, including high amounts of vegetables and rice instead of flour-based products. Fat sources included mainly butter, cream, and cold-pressed oils.

Read More: Recovered Data Casts Doubt On Whether Replacing Saturated Fat With Vegetable Oil Protects Against Heart Disease

The findings revealed participants on the very high-fat diet showed significant improvements in cardiometabolic risk factors, like ectopic fat storage, blood pressure, blood lipids (triglycerides), insulin and blood sugar. The total energy intake was within the normal range for both groups. Even those who had increased energy intake showed substantial reductions in fat stores and disease risk.

Researchers find a high-fat diet with saturated fat can boost “good” cholesterol levels. Photo courtesy of Pexels, Public Domain

Several studies have supported the belief saturated fat promotes cardiovascular diseases by raising the “bad” (LDL) cholesterol in the blood. However, the authors found no significant increase in LDL cholesterol. Rather, the “good” cholesterol increased only on the very high-fat diet.

“Our findings indicate that the overriding principle of a healthy diet is not the quantity of fat or carbohydrates, but the quality of the foods we eat,” said Johnny Laupsa-Borge, author of the study and Ph.D candidate, in a statement.

Moreover, this suggests most healthy people can probably stomach a high intake of saturated fat well, as long as the fat quality is good, and total energy intake is not too high. In fact “it may even be healthy,” said Nygård.

Read More: How To Reduce Your Risk Of Coronary Heart Disease With Food

It’s important to remember not all fat is bad fat. We need a good deal of healthy fats, like coconut oil, avocados, nuts and seeds, and saturated fat from animal sources, like eggs, grass-fed and organically-raised chickens and beef, buffalo, and wild-caught fish. Following a low-fat diet could have adverse effects.

Continuously consuming low-fat foods can lead us to seek more flavorful foods sprinkled in sugar. A 2014 study in JAMA found an increase in cardiovascular risks linked to a higher sugar intake. Researchers found those with the highest sugar intake had a 400 percent higher risk of heart attack than those with the lowest intake of sugar.

The truth is “[T]he alleged health risks of eating good-quality fats have been greatly exaggerated,” according to Simon Nitter Dankel, co-lead study author and assistant professor at the university.

Bottom line: Moderation and quality are key.

Source: Veum VL, Laupsa-Borge J, Eng O et al. Visceral adiposity and metabolic syndrome after very high-fat and low-fat isocaloric diets: a randomized controlled trial. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition . 2016.

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