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To your health: How healthy, effective are shake and juice diets? – Wilkes Barre Times

Alfred Casale To Your Health

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Whether you worked hard to build a healthy and fit summer body or if it’s still a work in progress, you may be struggling with how to maintain or lose some weight between summer barbecues and parties. That desire may have you reaching for a meal replacement shake diet or juice cleanse.

You’re constantly seeing people post incredible before and after photos on social media sites and seeing infomercials touting how great these products are. But you may be wondering how healthy, effective and sustainable are they?

The ideal way to lose weight or maintain a healthy weight is through a balanced diet that is low in fat and high in fruits, vegetables and lean protein. Whole foods typically provide a much better balance of nutrients than meal replacement shakes.

In addition, eating whole, real foods pushes you to make healthy choices that can help you maintain your weight loss in the long run. However, shake diets, or meal replacements, can be rather useful for jump starting weight loss.

The way most shake diets work is that they help you control how many calories you consume at mealtime. And burning more calories than you take it results in weight loss. Meal replacement shakes can also be more convenient and, in some cases, more cost effective than trips to the produce aisle and butcher in the grocery store.

Diet shake programs can also be good for people who consistently skip a certain meal, particularly breakfast.

Skipping meals, especially breakfast, can hinder your weight loss journey – skipping just one meal causes your blood-sugar level to take a nose dive, making you feel tired and unwell. Without a new supply of calories, your body shifts into starvation mode to conserve energy, which slows down your metabolism. When you do eventually eat, your body won’t burn the food off as efficiently and will likely store it as fat for energy.

While some diet programs’ shakes are fortified with a variety of vitamins and minerals, they typically don’t contain all of the nutritional components that whole foods provide.

Real foods provide you with antioxidants, vitamins and minerals that just aren’t in meal replacement shakes. If you do use one of these diet programs, supplement each meal you replace with a nutrient-packed, low calorie snack such as fruit, vegetables and whole grains.

Only sipping on meal replacement shakes is not a sustainable weight-loss strategy, either.

Replacing a few meals with shakes can help you drop a few pounds in the short term, but you can gain that weight right back if you stop the shakes and return to your previous diet. Make your program last by including regular physical activity and eating healthy, balanced meals throughout the day to support your shakes.

When picking out a shake, just like with other foods, it’s important to read its ingredients and nutrition label – the best option will keep added sugar and fat to a minimum while containing enough calories to keep you feeling full for several hours. Look for shakes that are high in protein and fiber.

And when it comes to juice cleanses, you’re better off eating whole, raw fruits and vegetables.

Juice cleanses can only help you lose weight in the short term because they’re low in calories. However, they severely constrict your calorie intake without providing you with necessary dietary fiber or protein. You’ll likely gain back any weight you lost once you complete your juice cleanse. Plus, you don’t need these juices to “cleanse” or “detoxify” your system – your kidneys and liver already do this for you.

By Alfred Casale

To Your Health

Dr. Alfred Casale is chairman of surgery for the Geisinger Heart Institute, co-director of the Cardiovascular Service Line for the Geisinger Health System and Associate Chief Medical Officer for the Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center. Readers may write to him via [email protected]

timesleader

Dr. Alfred Casale is chairman of surgery for the Geisinger Heart Institute, co-director of the Cardiovascular Service Line for the Geisinger Health System and Associate Chief Medical Officer for the Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center. Readers may write to him via [email protected]

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Fake Fasting Diet Slow Down Aging: Effective For Lab Rats, Effective For Humans?

Low-Calorie Diet

A new nutritional program, known as Fasting Mimicking Diet, has been shown to have similar benefits to other calorie-reduction plans but with less health risks and without starving individuals. The diet was developed by researchers at the University of Southern California.
(Photo : With Wind | Flickr)

Following a diet based on calorie restriction has been shown to be beneficial to the health of several organisms, but its effects on humans have been a subject of controversy as it requires individuals to undergo an extreme regimen of fasting.

Researchers at the University of Southern California (USC) have developed a nutritional plan known as Fasting Mimicking Diet (FMD) based on the concept of restricting the calorie intake of individuals in order to yield positive effects on health.

Valter Longo, professor of gerontology and biological science and director of USC’s Longevity Institute, and his team of researchers conducted an experiment on a group of laboratory mice to find out the effects of FMD. The subjected the animals to a calorie-restricted similar to fasting for eight days a month.

The researchers discovered that the regimen helped improve the mice’s regeneration in multiple systems and lengthened their lifespan.

Longo and his colleagues then applied a program for nineteen different individuals that followed a similar five-day low-protein and low-calorie diet schedule once a month for three months.

This time the researchers found that the diet plan, which was meant to simulate fasting and be supervised medically, was shown to improve the health of the participants and reduced risk factors related to aging.

The team, however, noted that larger randomized clinical tests are required to further support the findings of their study.

The USC study suggests that fasting can help increase the resistance of cells against stressors by cutting down the protein and molecule levels that are linked to growth and aging.

Longo and his team were successful in creating a dietary plan that has similar effects to fasting but with less health risks and without starving individuals. The FMD focuses on a regimen that is high in healthy fats but low in carbohydrates and protein.

In their experiment on mice, the researchers saw an increase in stem cells and various other types of cells, such as muscle, bone liver, immune and brain cells after subjecting the animals to FMD for four days twice a month.

The program helped improved memory and learning in the animals, and it reduced the risk for cancer, bone loss and inflammatory diseases.

The FMD program for the nineteen human participants, on the other hand, was administered for five days a month for three months. It provided them with around 34 percent to 54 percent of their normal calorie intake made up of 11 percent to 14 percent of proteins, 42 percent to 43 percent of carbohydrates and 44 percent to 46 percent of fat.

When the program ended, the participants experienced a reduction of risk factors related to several illnesses including cancer, heart disease, diabetes and aging.

“This is arguably the first non-chronic pre-clinically and clinically tested anti-aging and healthspan-promoting intervention shown to work and to be very feasible as a doctor or dietitian-supervised intervention,” Longo said.

“The FMD intervention will now undergo the rigorous process needed for FDA approval, which will first require confirmation and additional tests in 60 to 70 participants, followed by a trial with 500-1,000 participants.”

The University of Southern California study is featured in the journal Cell Metabolism.

Photo: With Wind | Flickr 

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Beyoncé Fans May Not Care About Her Vegan Diet, But We Do

Finding the perfect diet for your body is harder than finding the perfect swimsuit. (And that’s saying something!) Yet, when Beyoncé announced she’d found her Shangri-La of healthy eating, a lot of people were underwhelmed to say the least.

Queen Bey went on Good Morning America earlier this week to promote what she called “a major announcement.” But instead of dropping a new album or telling the world Blue Ivy was going to be a big sis, she used her international platform to talk about her not-so-new vegan diet, the 22 Day Diet Revolution. Since the beginning of the year, the star has given up meat, cheese, and eggs, and has gained leaner legs, clearer skin, and better sleep—taking her legendary beauty from jaw-dropping to other-worldly.

“I am not naturally the thinnest. I have curves. I’m proud of my curves and I have struggled since a young age with diets and finding something that actually works, actually keeps the weight off, has been difficult for me,” she confessed on GMA, echoing the same frustration so many of us feel when it comes to our bodies and dieting.

Fans immediately took to social media to voice their outrage, frustrated that all the hype had been just an ad for yet another diet program and seemingly-promotional partnership. “Still mad that I woke up early and subjected myself to @GMA just to hear Beyonce say she doesn’t enjoy life anymore #vegan,” tweeted one person, summing up the general feelings from the Beyhive.

But while we understand being disappointed that there isn’t a new Beyoncé song to play on endless loop during your workout (“Who runs the world? GIRLS!” does make an killer running mantra), we think she’s not getting nearly enough credit for her major life change. Finding a way to eat that makes you feel happy and healthy inside and out—and sticking to it—is a major accomplishment, no matter what type of diet it is. (Need ideas? Try one of The Best Diets for Your Health.)

Another major bone people want to pick is that Beyoncé, with her history of weight fluctuations and extreme diets, is the last person who should be giving nutrition advice. “What’s next? Justin Beiber writing a book on parenting?” quipped another Tweet. But she doesn’t claim to be a nutritionist, and the health benefits of eating a plant-based diet have been well established by experts. Plus, as women who’ve tried plenty of diets ourselves, it’s refreshing to hear her be so honest about her journey with the ups and downs.

Lastly, people are concerned about the cost, saying the multi-millionaire is out of touch with reality. And at $15 per meal, the 22 Day Revolution diet meal deliveries are admittedly pricey. Fortunately, eating more plants doesn’t have to be expensive. Skip the celeb-style meal delivery service and cook your own food (like these 6 Homemade Vegan Energy Bars). Then borrow a vegan cookbook for free from the library, buy produce on sale, and take advantage of the huge vegetarian and vegan communities on the internet. (One easy way to start: Check out our list of 44 healthy foods for under $1!)

All the critics make valid points, but the truth is we don’t care what Beyoncé is eating so much as the fact that she’s talking about it with the world. We love hearing about her journey to becoming the beautiful, self-confident, smart woman she is (and that so many of us strive to be). And if she wants to make a national announcement that she loves her curves, we’re listening. For her part, Beyoncé has handled the backlash with patience and class (as she does everything, we presume) and we are still looking forward to whatever she says next.

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Beyoncé Fans May Not Care About Her Vegan Diet, But We Do

Finding the perfect diet for your body is harder than finding the perfect swimsuit. (And that’s saying something!) Yet, when Beyoncé announced she’d found her Shangri-La of healthy eating, a lot of people were underwhelmed to say the least.

Queen Bey went on Good Morning America earlier this week to promote what she called “a major announcement.” But instead of dropping a new album or telling the world Blue Ivy was going to be a big sis, she used her international platform to talk about her not-so-new vegan diet, the 22 Day Diet Revolution. Since the beginning of the year, the star has given up meat, cheese, and eggs, and has gained leaner legs, clearer skin, and better sleep—taking her legendary beauty from jaw-dropping to other-worldly.

“I am not naturally the thinnest. I have curves. I’m proud of my curves and I have struggled since a young age with diets and finding something that actually works, actually keeps the weight off, has been difficult for me,” she confessed on GMA, echoing the same frustration so many of us feel when it comes to our bodies and dieting.

Fans immediately took to social media to voice their outrage, frustrated that all the hype had been just an ad for yet another diet program and seemingly-promotional partnership. “Still mad that I woke up early and subjected myself to @GMA just to hear Beyonce say she doesn’t enjoy life anymore #vegan,” tweeted one person, summing up the general feelings from the Beyhive.

But while we understand being disappointed that there isn’t a new Beyoncé song to play on endless loop during your workout (“Who runs the world? GIRLS!” does make an killer running mantra), we think she’s not getting nearly enough credit for her major life change. Finding a way to eat that makes you feel happy and healthy inside and out—and sticking to it—is a major accomplishment, no matter what type of diet it is. (Need ideas? Try one of The Best Diets for Your Health.)

Another major bone people want to pick is that Beyoncé, with her history of weight fluctuations and extreme diets, is the last person who should be giving nutrition advice. “What’s next? Justin Beiber writing a book on parenting?” quipped another Tweet. But she doesn’t claim to be a nutritionist, and the health benefits of eating a plant-based diet have been well established by experts. Plus, as women who’ve tried plenty of diets ourselves, it’s refreshing to hear her be so honest about her journey with the ups and downs.

Lastly, people are concerned about the cost, saying the multi-millionaire is out of touch with reality. And at $15 per meal, the 22 Day Revolution diet meal deliveries are admittedly pricey. Fortunately, eating more plants doesn’t have to be expensive. Skip the celeb-style meal delivery service and cook your own food (like these 6 Homemade Vegan Energy Bars). Then borrow a vegan cookbook for free from the library, buy produce on sale, and take advantage of the huge vegetarian and vegan communities on the internet. (One easy way to start: Check out our list of 44 healthy foods for under $1!)

All the critics make valid points, but the truth is we don’t care what Beyoncé is eating so much as the fact that she’s talking about it with the world. We love hearing about her journey to becoming the beautiful, self-confident, smart woman she is (and that so many of us strive to be). And if she wants to make a national announcement that she loves her curves, we’re listening. For her part, Beyoncé has handled the backlash with patience and class (as she does everything, we presume) and we are still looking forward to whatever she says next.

No joke: Low-cost, non-profit diet keeps weight off

Under the cost-reducing peer-leadership structure of TOPS, dieters and volunteers meet once per week during the weight loss and weight maintenance phases.

Those elusive long-term results became a reality for thousands in a new study at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus in which they managed to lose weight and keep it off for seven years.

“We know that people lose weight and then gain it back,” says study author Nia S. Mitchell, M.D., MPH, of the Anschutz Health and Wellness Center at CU Anschutz. “In this case, we found that people who renewed their annual membership in the program lost a clinically significant amount of weight and kept it off.”

It’s a program called Take Off Pounds Sensibly (TOPS) that’s led by peer-volunteers in chapters around North America and costs dieters $92 annually, making it relatively inexpensive compared to other diet programs.

Working with roughly 75,000 participants, the study focused on the relationship between weight and program renewal.

In their first year of following the TOPS diet, 50 percent of participants lost at least five percent of their body weight, an amount the researchers deemed to be clinically significant.

Of them, 62 percent who stayed with the program maintained their weight loss for seven years.

Under the cost-reducing peer-leadership structure of TOPS, dieters and volunteers meet once per week during the weight loss and weight maintenance phases.

The two phases are very similar to each other, according to the researchers, and involve participants working on approaches to weight management with various tools and guidelines for food selection, support and information, and the weight maintenance phase continues indefinitely.

“Despite decades of obesity research two issues remain elusive in weight management: significant, long-term weight-loss maintenance and widely accessible programs,” says Mitchell. “To reverse this epidemic we need to find programs that are effective at weight loss and maintenance, low-cost, and easy to implement and disseminate widely.”

The program is easy to implement and disseminate widely due to its low-cost, and the study has implications for just about anyone who wants to lose weight and keep it off.

“As long-term weight loss is difficult to achieve in any clinical circumstance, TOPS may be a viable option to treat those who are overweight or obese,” says Mitchell.

The study was published in the American Journal of Preventative Medicine.

AFP Relaxnews

Belviq for Weight Loss is Now Available to Qualified Diet Doc Patients Nationwide

Because of their commitment to bring the most effective weight loss methods to their patients, Diet Doc now adds FDA approved Belviq for weight loss to their already impressive stable of safe and fast weight loss prescription diet medications.

Houston, TX (PRWEB) May 29, 2015

Belviq for weight loss, also known as lorcaserin, is an FDA approved prescription diet medication. In 2012, the FDA approved Belviq specifically for the treatment of obesity when individuals have a BMI 30. It is also approved for individuals with a BMI 27 with at least one additional weight-related health condition such as high blood pressure, diabetes, or high cholesterol.

Belviq’s main function for weight loss focuses on the brain’s appetite center. 5-HT receptors in the hypothalamus are stimulated by serotonin, a neurotransmitter that plays a significant role in regulating mood, anxiety, appetite and feeding behavior, and reproductive behavior. Belviq for weight loss targets a specific type of 5-HT receptor involved in the pathway of producing the hormone proopiomelanocortin (POMC), which works to leave patients feeling full and satisfied. The most common side effects reported by patients include headache, sinus congestion, nausea, anxiety, and depression.

Patients are encouraged to call the company or visit http://www.dietdoc.com to schedule a private, no-cost and immediate appointment with one of Diet Doc’s highly trained weight loss doctors for recommendations and guidance for the safest and most effective weight loss method. Because the doctors specialize in nutrition and the science of weight loss, they are better able to couple their patients with the safest and most effective diet plans and prescription diet medications that are compatible with age, gender, medical conditions and nutritional needs.

During the initial doctor consultation, the patient’s past history will be reviewed and the entire system will be assessed to uncover and address hormonal imbalances, cellular toxicity or improperly functioning organs that may have been previously unidentified and may be causing weight gain or preventing weight loss. Meal and snack plans will be tailored to be specific to each patient’s nutritional needs and that work in combination with pure, prescription hormone diet treatments, diet pills, powerful fat burners and now, Belviq for weight loss, to target fat that has become comfortably and dangerously nestled around the internal organs and deep within the cells of the hard to reach areas to be released into the bloodstream, burned for energy and quickly flushed from the system.

And, because Diet Doc respects each patient’s time and privacy, they have partnered with Telemedicine, enabling patients to consult online with a doctor, work with nutritional experts, order prescription diet medication and schedule weekly checkup calls to monitor progress throughout.

For added convenience, prescription diet medications can be reordered via the phone or internet for direct delivery to each patient’s front door without time consuming, embarrassing and costly doctor visits. And, because Diet Doc is an approved, medically supervised weight loss program, the company is recognized by many health insurance companies. Reimbursement forms, flex spending cards and health savings account cards are also accepted. The company has become a leader in the medical weight loss industry and urges those who are struggling to lose 10-20 pounds to those who must lose 100 pounds or more to call today.

About the Company:

Diet Doc Weight Loss is the nation’s leader in medical, weight loss offering a full line of prescription medication, doctor, nurse and nutritional coaching support. For over a decade, Diet Doc has produced a sophisticated, doctor designed weight loss program that addresses each individual specific health need to promote fast, safe and long term weight loss.

Diet Doc Contact Information:

Providing care across the USA

Headquarters:

San Diego, CA

(888) 934-4451

Info(at)DietDoc(dot)info

http://www.dietdoc.com

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DietDocMedical

Facebook: DietDocMedicalWeightLoss

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/diet-doc-weight-loss?trk=biz-brand-tree-co-logo

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/05/prweb12753311.htm

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