Web Analytics

Tag-Archive for » diet plan «

To lose weight, you need to understand the psychology of why you crave the wrong things

The UK’s diet industry is thriving to say the least. More than half of British adults try to lose weight by controlling their calorie intake each year. Unfortunately, losing weight is not as easy as turning down a biscuit, or opting for salad. And even those who have been successful in their dieting endeavours find it difficult to do.

So why is it that even when we have the best of intentions, dieting is so difficult? Why can’t we control those cravings?

1. Food cues

We’ve all done it: walked past a tasty-looking supermarket stand, or smelled something delicious and immediately started drooling over whatever treat is on display, regardless of calorie content or nutrition. Sensory food cues like these can be difficult to ignore and aren’t just triggered by taste or smell—advertising or brand logos can tempt us in too.

When we are hungry, the hormone gherlin stimulates the brain, which means that we notice food cues more. Researchers have also found that our brains pay more attention to cues for unhealthy foods—those which are high in sugar and fat—than healthy foods, when we are hungry. In studies where pictures of high-calorie foods were shown to participants, it was found that the cues elicited anticipatory appetite responses, such as salivation, cravings and a reported desire to eat.

All of this together means that the attention-grabbing properties of high-calorie foods are likely to present a significant challenge for individuals who are attempting to lose weight—particularly if their diet makes them feel hungry.

On a positive note, it may be possible to train ourselves to ignore tempting cues. One study has shown that participants who were taught to ignore high calorie food cues on a computer-based task consumed less snack foods than those who were trained to pay attention to them

2. Forbidden foods are more tempting

Dieting often involves “giving up” more pleasurable foods in an attempt to reduce calorie intake. But if we are asked to avoid eating a food we enjoy, researchers have found that we will crave it—and even have a greater desire to consume the forbidden item than if we had not been deprived.

In another study, frequent consumers of chocolate were asked not to eat any for a week. In this case the participants found images of chocolate and other high-calorie food items more salient—the deprivation had made them want the high calorie foods more—than the chocolate eaters who had not been deprived. In addition, when asked to taste a forbidden food, it has been found that research participants who have been deprived of it will typically consume more calories.

All of this means that even when dieters attempt to avoid foods that are pleasurable, the behavioral and cognitive response to deprivation may inadvertently be creating more temptation.

3. The “what-the-hell” effect

When trying to lose weight, choices about what to eat and when it should be eaten are usually constrained by the rules of a chosen diet plan. But rigid dieting rules are problematic, as any eating behaviour that does not rely on the physiological signals of hunger increases the risk of overeating.

Another problem with dieting rules is that only a small violation—a sneaky slice of cake, for example—is enough to derail the whole diet. Researchers call this the “what-the-hell effect”—and it has been demonstrated in a number of laboratory experiments. Studies consistently show that dieters who believe they have consumed a high-calorie snack—and so have broken the rules of their diet—will consume more calories during a later meal than those who do not think they have violated the rules.

Although in real terms eating a few extra calories is unlikely to have a major impact on a diet, such lapses can have a bigger psychological impact. Dieting “failure” is likely to trigger negative emotions such as guilt or stress, both of which are known to cause overeating.

So what can be learned from all of this? Diets which require the dieter to follow rigid rules or forbid them from consuming foods they enjoy appear to be problematic, as they paradoxically increase the risk of overeating. Instead, it may be useful for dieters to acknowledge that humans are inherently drawn to high-calorie foods and that these cues present the most temptation if we are hungry.

Rising rates of obesity mean that many more of us are turning to diets to lose weight. However, while there is no perfect diet to help us achieve our health goals, understanding how the brain works, and recognizing the psychological effects of dieting may help us regain control in the face of temptation.

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.The Conversation

Custom Search

The seven-day GM diet is back – but is it actually good for you?

Shoulder pads, sequins, and a seven-day diet plan that asks you to eat eight bananas in one day – the 80s certainly gifted us with some weird and wonderful trends. And now (along with the shoulder pads and sequins), that diet plan is making a comeback.

Supposedly the brainchild of General Motors (GM), the GM diet plan was developed to help their employees lose weight – although the automotive company has never actually confirmed the connection. A quick Google search reveals pages of fans of the diet, who rave about their 11lb weight loss after just seven days. 

So what’s behind this ‘miracle’ diet plan – and is it actually good for you?

In short, the GM diet is an extremely strict seven-day plan that suggests you drink 12-15 glasses of water a day while cutting out alcohol, tea and coffee; and restrict your calorific intake from food. The breakdown of each day looks like this:

  • Day One:…
Custom Search

What is The 2 Meal Day diet plan – Business Insider



27-year-old Max Lowery has
just published a book on his own intermittent fasting weight loss
plan, The 2 Meal Day.

Max
Lowry


Max Lowery was a stockbroker in the City for four years leading a
booze-fueled and sleep deprived life before he became a heath
guru.

He quit the banking world and went traveling around South
America, which is where he accidentally fell into intermittent
fasting.

While doing lots of hiking in Brazil, he told Business Insider:
“I was trying to save time and money so I started eating one or
one and a half meals a day.”

He discovered the local buffet restaurants, known as
“Kilogramas,” which as the name suggests, sell home-cooked food
by the kilo.

“Some of them were actually working out quite expensive, but I
found one where for a set price you could eat as much as you like
and got into this habit of having just one huge meal a day at
about 6 p.m. or 7 p.m. I felt amazing.”

Upon his return to London, Lowery reverted back to eating three
meals a day. “I started to feel really lethargic, was always
thinking about my next meal, and my body fat rose from 7% to
12%.”

He began researching intermittent fasting and realised he had
been following a long version of that. Unknowingly, he had
trained his body to be self-sufficient and put it into
fat-burning mode.

That was four years ago. Now Lowery, a 27-year-old a personal
trainer and health coach, has written a book on his own
intermittent fasting weight loss plan called The 2 Meal
Day
.

Fasting has nothing to do with starvation, according to
Lowery.


Max Lowery

The premise of 2 Meal Day is that by eating just two meals in a
day — either breakfast and lunch or lunch and dinner, thus
introducing a daily 16-hour fasting period — you can retrain your
body to become “fat adapted,” meaning you burn stored body fat
for energy, rather than being dependent on sugars from food.

“It’s not just about skipping a meal, it’s about spending as much
time as possible in the fasted state,” Lowery added.

The health benefits
of prolonged fasting
are scientifically recognized, and are
said to include weight loss, muscle preservation, reduced
cholesterol and blood pressure, and higher endorphin and energy
levels.

According to Lowery, following his diet plan will not only help
you lose weight, have more energy, and no longer find yourself
dependent on caffeine and sugar for boosts, but it will also make
you less hungry.

“When you’re in tune with your body you can understand what
hunger really feels like, it’s something that happens every 16-24
hours, not every four,” he said. “The Western world spends next
to no time in the fasted state, just one or two hours max.”

“It’s a very beneficial state to be in, your body starts to
cleanse and heal itself.”

It’s important to stick to a routine.


Max
Lowry

He said it’s important that at the beginning, you get into a
routine of skipping the same meal each day, and stick to it.
“Once you start burning fat for energy you can start mixing
things here and there to suit lifestyle changes if you need to,”
he said.

About 80% of Lowery’s clients skip breakfast rather than dinner.
“For most people it’s practically and socially easier to skip
breakfast.”

Lowery usually has his first meal around 3 p.m. but it’s
sometimes later. “It completely depends on what’s going on. If
it’s a training day I’m a lot hungrier, [but] on rest days I eat
a lot less and that’s the way it should be.”

In a world where we’ve been taught that breakfast is the most
sacred meal of the day, he could be in for a tough sell.

However, Lowery said: “There are lots of studies to suggest that
we’re not as good at tolerating food in the morning, which means
you’re going to be more affected by spikes in blood sugar
levels.”

“Not only that, cortisol is higher in the mornings. The
combination of glucose (sugars from food) and cortisol in the
blood stream can cause insulin resistance.”

Eventually, your body stops feeling deprived.


Tom
Joy

The 2 Meal Day has been dubbed in “the new 5:2″ — a popular diet
in which you eat normally for five days and a week and restrict
your calorie intake to 600 calories on two “fast” days.

But Lowery argues they’re actually totally different.

“With the 5:2 you’re only restricting your eating twice a week,
and you’re also calorie counting on those days — which you don’t
do with 2 Meal Day.”

“With this plan you’re doing it every day, so your body adapts
and eventually stops feeling deprived. For those reasons about
30% of people feel restricted doing the 5:2, compared to 10% on 2
Meal Day.”

Much of Lowery’s initial research on fasting methods was through
men’s strength forums, but he wants to bring the concept in to
the mainstream.

“I’m trying to bring something quite niche and male-based and
make it more accessible,” he said.

For health tips, food inspo, or simply to keep up with his
energetic lifestyle, you can follow Lowery on Instagram @max.lowery.

Custom Search

Weight loss diet plan with THIS tea will help you lose weight, experts claims

Rick said: “One of the most highly researched fat burners is green tea.

Scientific studies show that drinking up to five cups of green tea a day can increase daily metabolism.”

A matcha latte is made with milk, matcha power.

First, steam the milk before whisking the matcher powder into the milk.

Green tea has been said to help with weight loss for many years, but does the plant really help you slim? Express.co.uk investigated recently.

Unlike other leaves used for black tea – green tea leaves have not withered, which is why they still have their lush green colour.

Health effects of the drink are touted amongst nutritionists and health experts.

A former stockbroker turned personal trainer tells us why eating 2 meals a day is the best way to lose weight and …



27-year-old Max Lowery has
just published a book on his own intermittent fasting weight loss
plan, The 2 Meal Day.

Max
Lowry


Max Lowery was a stockbroker in the City for four years leading a
booze-fueled and sleep deprived life before he became a heath
guru.

He quit the banking world and went traveling around South
America, which is where he accidentally fell into intermittent
fasting.

While doing lots of hiking in Brazil, he told Business Insider:
“I was trying to save time and money so I started eating one or
one and a half meals a day.”

He discovered the local buffet restaurants, known as
“Kilogramas,” which as the name suggests, sell home-cooked food
by the kilo.

“Some of them were actually working out quite expensive, but I
found one where for a set price you could eat as much as you like
and got into this habit of having just one huge meal a day at
about 6 p.m. or 7 p.m. I felt amazing.”

Upon his return to London, Lowery reverted back to eating three
meals a day. “I started to feel really lethargic, was always
thinking about my next meal, and my body fat rose from 7% to
12%.”

He began researching intermittent fasting and realised he had
been following a long version of that. Unknowingly, he had
trained his body to be self-sufficient and put it into
fat-burning mode.

That was four years ago. Now Lowery, a 27-year-old a personal
trainer and health coach, has written a book on his own
intermittent fasting weight loss plan called The 2 Meal
Day
.

Fasting has nothing to do with starvation, according to
Lowery.


Max Lowery

The premise of 2 Meal Day is that by eating just two meals in a
day — either breakfast and lunch or lunch and dinner, thus
introducing a daily 16-hour fasting period — you can retrain your
body to become “fat adapted,” meaning you burn stored body fat
for energy, rather than being dependent on sugars from food.

“It’s not just about skipping a meal, it’s about spending as much
time as possible in the fasted state,” Lowery added.

The health benefits
of prolonged fasting
are scientifically recognized, and are
said to include weight loss, muscle preservation, reduced
cholesterol and blood pressure, and higher endorphin and energy
levels.

According to Lowery, following his diet plan will not only help
you lose weight, have more energy, and no longer find yourself
dependent on caffeine and sugar for boosts, but it will also make
you less hungry.

“When you’re in tune with your body you can understand what
hunger really feels like, it’s something that happens every 16-24
hours, not every four,” he said. “The Western world spends next
to no time in the fasted state, just one or two hours max.”

“It’s a very beneficial state to be in, your body starts to
cleanse and heal itself.”

It’s important to stick to a routine.


Max
Lowry

He said it’s important that at the beginning, you get into a
routine of skipping the same meal each day, and stick to it.
“Once you start burning fat for energy you can start mixing
things here and there to suit lifestyle changes if you need to,”
he said.

About 80% of Lowery’s clients skip breakfast rather than dinner.
“For most people it’s practically and socially easier to skip
breakfast.”

Lowery usually has his first meal around 3 p.m. but it’s
sometimes later. “It completely depends on what’s going on. If
it’s a training day I’m a lot hungrier, [but] on rest days I eat
a lot less and that’s the way it should be.”

In a world where we’ve been taught that breakfast is the most
sacred meal of the day, he could be in for a tough sell.

However, Lowery said: “There are lots of studies to suggest that
we’re not as good at tolerating food in the morning, which means
you’re going to be more affected by spikes in blood sugar
levels.”

“Not only that, cortisol is higher in the mornings. The
combination of glucose (sugars from food) and cortisol in the
blood stream can cause insulin resistance.”

Eventually, your body stops feeling deprived.


Tom
Joy

The 2 Meal Day has been dubbed in “the new 5:2″ — a popular diet
in which you eat normally for five days and a week and restrict
your calorie intake to 600 calories on two “fast” days.

But Lowery argues they’re actually totally different.

“With the 5:2 you’re only restricting your eating twice a week,
and you’re also calorie counting on those days — which you don’t
do with 2 Meal Day.”

“With this plan you’re doing it every day, so your body adapts
and eventually stops feeling deprived. For those reasons about
30% of people feel restricted doing the 5:2, compared to 10% on 2
Meal Day.”

Much of Lowery’s initial research on fasting methods was through
men’s strength forums, but he wants to bring the concept in to
the mainstream.

“I’m trying to bring something quite niche and male-based and
make it more accessible,” he said.

For health tips, food inspo, or simply to keep up with his
energetic lifestyle, you can follow Lowery on Instagram @max.lowery.

The secret to losing weight? Eat more! In this exclusive extract from her new book AMELIA FREER reveals how it …

Amelia Freer — the woman behind both James Corden and Kirstie Allsopp’s dramatic weight loss — reveals the startlingly simple basis of her fat-busting plan and how it can work equally well for men and women

Amelia Freer — the woman behind both James Corden and Kirstie Allsopp’s dramatic weight loss — reveals the startlingly simple basis of her fat-busting plan and how it can work equally well for men and women

Last week, writer Nick Curtis showed how your partner could shape up by losing an impressive 8lb in nine days on Amelia Freer’s new plan. Today, Amelia — the woman behind both James Corden and Kirstie Allsopp’s dramatic weight loss — reveals the startlingly simple basis of her fat-busting plan and how it can work equally well for men and women. Whatever your age or fitness level, here’s how to uncover a slimmer you.

Most of us have a good idea about the general principles of healthy eating, but these days there’s also a whole new set of eating hang-ups.

Thanks to the clean-eating movement we’re bombarded with messages about what we supposedly must eat and what we must avoid. In some ways, the movement’s been a step in the right direction, with good nutrition taking centre stage and easier access to ingredients. But — and this is a big but — it has also created anxiety, fear and confusion around food.

Food is not something to be feared. My eating plan is about the concept of ‘positive nutrition’ with a simple but effective pyramid tool. I want to focus on what you can eat, not what you can’t, and in doing so help you maintain healthy eating habits for life.

THE FOOD PYRAMID

The ‘positive nutrition’ pyramid (see table opposite), is a simple collection of images, each of which represents a single portion of food. The whole pyramid represents one day, and the aim is to tick off every type of food pictured.

After you’ve had breakfast and lunch, for example, you can then see exactly which foods still need to be ticked for your evening meal. You can then prepare a meal that incorporates those.

Some foods fall into more than one category — for example, a handful of almonds can be either ‘nuts and seeds’ or ‘protein’ or ‘healthy fats’. Half a tin of chickpeas could be both ‘starchy carbohydrates’ or ‘protein’.

It’s up to you to choose whichever food type you most need, and work out the rest of your day accordingly.

Importantly, the pyramid doesn’t specify or restrict what you choose to eat on top of the portions recommended. The foods pictured represent a suggested minimum.

In fact, some people struggle to include all the vegetables pictured and work up to this level slowly, starting with just one extra portion a day.

That doesn’t mean I’m encouraging a completely free rein — the pyramid will work only when it’s your first priority. It’s then up to you if you wish to add in foods or drinks that may be nice, but not necessary.

If you don’t manage every food pictured, don’t worry. I don’t want you to be stuffing yourself with all the remaining portions or glugging five glasses of water just before bedtime. Neither should you try to ‘catch up’ the next day; each morning, simply start afresh.

WELL WATERED 

Water should make up the majority of your fluid intake. If you don’t like plain water, try adding slices of cucumber or lemon. Also try herbal teas and organic milk. Drink tea and coffee in moderation: no more than one to two cups of coffee or three to four cups of tea a day.

Remember: Avoid sugar and artificially sweetened drinks. Giving yourself a clean break allows your taste buds to change: you may well find those drinks taste rather different after a couple of weeks without them.

Six portions of veg of all varieties should form the foundation of your meals, as they’re filling and rich in vitamins, fibre, minerals and beneficial nutrients

Six portions of veg of all varieties should form the foundation of your meals, as they’re filling and rich in vitamins, fibre, minerals and beneficial nutrients

GREEN IS GOOD 

Six portions of veg of all varieties should form the foundation of your meals, as they’re filling and rich in vitamins, fibre, minerals and beneficial nutrients. Try . . .

  • 1 to 2 handfuls raw leafy greens (salad leaves, spinach, watercress, rocket, baby gem leaves).
  • 2 to 3 tbsp chopped, fresh herbs
  • 3 heaped tbsp raw or cooked veg
  • 1 carrot or stick of celery
  • 1 medium courgette, leek or onion
  • 2 medium tomatoes or a handful of cherry tomatoes
  • half an aubergine or large pepper
  • a quarter to a half of a small head of cabbage

Remember: Don’t get too hung up on exact portion sizes — ‘guesstimates’ are fine. You could make up one portion with half an onion and half a carrot, for example.

You’ll get the hang of it quickly by using your clenched fist as a rough guide. Green, leafy veg can be a good non-dairy source of calcium for vegans or those avoiding dairy and just as with fruit, try to eat a rainbow of colours of seasonal vegetables.

If you’re not eating anywhere near three portions of fruit and six veg at the moment, I suggest you increase your intake by just one extra portion per day, working your way up

If you’re not eating anywhere near three portions of fruit and six veg at the moment, I suggest you increase your intake by just one extra portion per day, working your way up

THREE FRUIT RULE

If you’re not eating anywhere near three portions of fruit and six veg at the moment, I suggest you increase your intake by just one extra portion per day, working your way up. Try:

  • 1 handful large fruit chunks (mango, pineapple, melon)
  • 1 medium-size fruit (orange, pear, banana, apple, peach, nectarine)
  • 2 pieces small fruit (plums, apricot)
  • 2 large handfuls berries
  • 1 handful grapes — aim for black or red varieties for an antioxidant boost
  • 2 heaped tbsp fruit compote/puree

Remember: Don’t rely on dried fruit. They’re higher in sugar and not as filling as whole fruits. The same goes for smoothies. It’s fine to whizz up one portion of fruit (ideally alongside some veg and a source of protein) into a smoothie occasionally, but it’s better to eat your fruit whole.

And fruit juices don’t count as a portion of fruit — the fibre has been removed and they can be unhealthily high in sugar. Try to eat skins where possible because they provide fibre as well as antioxidants.

Include more than meat or fish in your protein three a day

Include more than meat or fish in your protein three a day

MORE THAN MEAT 

Include more than meat or fish in your protein three a day. Try:

  • 2 medium eggs (ideally organic or free-range)
  • 4 tbsp (about half a tin) cooked pulses (chickpeas, lentils, beans)
  • 150g organic, plain, fat-free yoghurt or 120g tofu

Remember: Avoid processed or smoked meats, such as ham, cured meats, bacon and sausages. Instead, eat fish two to three times a week. Ideally, one of those portions should be an oily fish, for its beneficial omega-3 fats. I also get at least one of my daily portions of protein from plants, such as almonds at breakfast or hummus at lunch.

THE RIGHT CARBS 

We get plenty of carbohydrates from fruit and vegetables, as well as from plant-based proteins such as beans and peas, so the two portions of complex carbohydrates are optional. Try:

  • 4 to 5 tbsp whole rolled oats
  • 1 to 2 slices bread (rye, wholegrain, buckwheat or sourdough)
  • 3 to 4 sugar-free oatcakes
  • 4 tbsp (about half a tin) cooked pulses (beans, lentils, legumes)
  • 2 to 3 small potatoes
  • 2 to 3 tbsp mashed potatoes, pumpkin or squash
  • 1 small sweet or baked potato
  • 3-4 heaped tbsp cooked, unprocessed grains/seeds (brown/wild rice, quinoa, barley or millet).

Remember: Opt for the lowest sugar, highest fibre and least processed carbohydrates you can find. The more it looks like it did when it was growing, the better.

Dietary fat is essential to the normal and healthy functioning of our bodies

Dietary fat is essential to the normal and healthy functioning of our bodies

GOOD FATS 

Dietary fat is essential to the normal and healthy functioning of our bodies. It is, however, the most energy dense of all the food groups, so if you’re watching your weight, you may want to stick to a couple of reasonably sized portions each day to make sure you give your body the nutrients it needs, without going overboard and tipping the scales. Try:

  • a quarter medium avocado
  • 1 tbsp cooking or dressing oil (olive, avocado or coconut oil)
  • 1 tbsp nut butter or tahini
  • 2 tbsp coconut yoghurt
  • 30g (matchbox size) cheese

Remember: There’s a difference between fats in terms of their potential health benefits, so I use a ‘traffic light’ system:

Red avoid: Processed trans fats and hydrogenated fats (found in processed foods, margarine, pastry, cakes and biscuits), commercial salad dressings and oils heated repeatedly to high temperatures, as this can create trans fats.

Amber eat mindfully: Animal fats such as those found in meat and dairy products.

Green eat happily: Oily fish or fish-oil supplements, nuts, seeds, avocado, olive oil.

Aim for a handful of unsalted nuts (almonds, cashews, peanuts, pecans) or seeds (chia, pumpkin, poppy, sesame) a day

Aim for a handful of unsalted nuts (almonds, cashews, peanuts, pecans) or seeds (chia, pumpkin, poppy, sesame) a day

GO NUTS 

Aim for a handful of unsalted nuts (almonds, cashews, peanuts, pecans) or seeds (chia, pumpkin, poppy, sesame) a day. They’re nutrient-dense, with a mixture of unsaturated fats, plant protein, minerals, fibre and phytonutrients.

Remember: Buy nuts and seeds raw, whole and unprocessed.

Eat a variety to ensure you’re topping up on different nutrients without going overboard on any in particular. Brazil nuts, for example, are a great source of essential mineral selenium; but you can eat too many; aim for 3–4 a week.

Extracted from Nourish And Glow: The 10-Day Plan by Amelia Freer (£16.99, Michael Joseph, out March 23). © Amelia Freer 2017. To order for £12.74 (offer valid to April 3), visit mailbookshop.co.uk or call 0844 571 0640. PP free on orders over £15.

Facebook Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com