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Diet For Gout Sufferers

Is There a Special Diet For Gout?

The quick answer is yes, there is a diet for gout. It involves including the foods that can help alleviate symptoms and avoiding those that can make the condition worse.

Millions of people are affected by this type of joint pain. Often, they are heavy drinkers, overweight, or just unhealthy eaters. Fortunately, there are dietary changes you can make starting today to keep the pain away.

A normal, healthy diet for gout consists of many different tasty foods. Oily fish like salmon, flax seed, and nuts may help to avoid the inflammation associated with the condition. Eating cherries and other dark berries can help keep reduce the levels of uric acid in the body. Some other foods good for preventing the condition are tofu, those high in potassium such as bananas, and pineapple juice.

Cherries have been known as one of the greatest foods to avoid gout problems. If you can’t find fresh cherries, many health food stores carry a concentrate that works as well. Try to avoid highly processed or artificially colored and flavored cherries as these may actually make symptoms worse. Dried cherries are sometimes helpful as well.

A Special Diet for Gout Sufferers

Foods high in purines should be avoided, as these are metabolized into uric acid, which is the cause of gout pain in the first place. Herring, yeast, organ meats, bacon, alcohol, and most shellfish can cause an onset and should not be a significant part of any diet for gout.

Diet For Gout Sufferers

Diet For Gout Sufferers

Asisde from eliminating certain foods to avoid gout, you should also try to lose any extra weight and get as much exercise as possible. Excess weight can put pressure on already painful joints. A normal healthy diet consisting of plenty of antioxidants can help you to achieve this goal.

Drinking plenty of water is also a good part of a diet for gout. Since the cause is a buildup in the joints of hard crystals that come from too much uric acid, water can help flush the acid out and eliminate the crystals. Eight eight ounce glasses of water a day is usually the recommended amount.

Some gout sufferers find that mixing a half teaspoon of baking soda into the water helps to keep the symptoms away, although if they are suffering an attack, usually a whole teaspoon works to help relieve the problem. Be careful when using baking soda as it can raise blood pressure, especially in people who already have high blood pressure.

Planning a special diet for gout relief is not something most people want to do. We have grown to love our junk foods and alcoholic beverages. However, in order to avoid the pain, stiffness, and swelling associated with this condition, sacrifices must be made. Changing the way you eat and eliminating certain foods to avoid gout twill help you to feel better tomorrow and will keep the pain away.

Featured Diet for Gout Treatment

After extensively researching treatment options for gout, we discovered a breakthrough natural treatment that we have had tremendous success with.

This special gout solution is revealed in the Gout Remedy Report and it contains all of the natural gout remedies, including a special diet for gout and foods to avoid to help reduce inflammation, swelling and stiffness as well as protect the joints and provide long lasting pain relief.

Try the Gout Remedy Report today and see if this natural, effective treatment can help you eliminate the pain associated with this condition.

Yes there is a special diet for gout sufferers!

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Debate fires up again about the 5:2 diet

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So, it sounds easy – cut back on your calories, right back, on just two days a week and shed the kilos? In theory, yes, but in reality it may not be so easy for everyone.

Diets of 500-600 calories mean that you will not be eating very much. For example, 500-600 calories spread over two meals equates to one poached egg on a small slice of wholegrain toast, a piccolo coffee in one meal and just 80-100 grams of  fish and vegetables or salad in the other.

For non-eaters, such as busy businessmen or shift workers, this may not seem that extreme but for the average person, who tends to eat several times a day, such an enormous shift in eating habits may not prove that easy, particularly in social situations.

My experience is that followers tend to eat more like 800-1000 calories per day while fasting, as an extra coffee or snack slips in, which unfortunately negates the benefits of the “fast”.

The second issue when individuals adopt diets that are restrictive in nature is that psychologically it can prime us to think about food more and more.

In this context, the simple act of aggressively restricting calories, especially after a lifetime of being “on” and “off” various diets, triggers the deeply entrenched thoughts that accompany the start of yet another diet.

In this instance, the mere notion of being restricted, even for a very short period is enough to drive individuals to think about food, or rather the lack of it more and more, makes it almost impossible to maintain long term.

Another crucial point when considering including a regular fast in your weekly dietary regime is what your energy demands are like. If you sit down in front of a computer for many hours each day, and are not overly interested in food, cutting back for a couple of days is unlikely to cause any major issues.

On the other hand, if you are a busy mum with three kids and you go to the gym every day, chances are cutting your calories back that much when your energy demands are high may leave you feeling tired, irritable and battling extreme hunger and cravings, even if it is just for a day in total.

As is the case with any diet, no matter how positive the results are reported to be, it’s important to make sure it is sustainable and, most importantly, doing no damage.

So, if you know that your body and metabolism will benefit from such an extreme diet kick start, by all means, give the 5:2 Diet a try, but make sure you do it right – just 500-600 calories per day in total.

On the other hand, if cutting back your calories so aggressively seems a little too extreme for you, why not just try cutting back a little – drop the snacks, have a smaller portion of dinner and have a salad for lunch.

You may be surprised to find that you can also lose a few kilos just cutting back slightly, every single day. 


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Ruling bloc ditches plan to pass casino bill in current Diet session

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Japan’s ruling parties have abandoned a plan to seek passage during the current Diet session through Nov. 30 of a bill to repeal a ban on casinos, due mainly to inadequate time for deliberations, a senior Liberal Democratic Party member said Friday.

The ruling camp will now try to pass the bill aimed at boosting tourism to Japan during the next ordinary Diet session beginning in early 2015.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe had sought early passage of the casino bill as a pillar of Japan’s growth strategy. But Komeito, the junior partner in the ruling coalition headed by Abe’s Liberal Democratic Party, has been cautious about the legislation.

Komeito Secretary General Yoshihisa Inoue has said Japan should pursue economic revitalization without depending on gambling.

The bill to promote the creation of integrated resort facilities featuring casinos was originally compiled by a nonpartisan group of lawmakers and submitted to the Diet in December 2013 by the LDP, the opposition People’s Life Party and the predecessor of the Japan Innovation Party.

In October, the nonpartisan group agreed to revise the bill by tightening conditions for Japanese nationals to enter casinos, in an effort to alleviate worries about a deterioration in public safety and fueling addiction to gambling.

==Kyodo

Copyright 2014 Kyodo News International.

All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/kyodo-news-international/141107/ruling-bloc-ditches-plan-pass-casino-bill-current-diet



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Marika Sboros – can Tim Noakes save North Korea’s Kim Jong-un from himself?

Is anyone surprised at speculation surrounding the health of North Korea’s leader Kim Jong-un? I’m not. Just check out the moon face and double chins. The ‘Supreme Leader’, as the 31-year-old  is known, has grown fatter and sicker since taking over after the death of his father, Kim Jong-il in 2011.  My prescription for him? The Tim Noakes diet, and some mindfulness training. MS

 By Marika Sboros

Kim Jong-un North Korea

North Korea’s ‘Supreme Leader’, Kimg Jong-un has been overdoing the carbs

In July, TV footage showed North Korea’s corpulent young leader clearly sweating, and walking with a “peculiar gait”. That’s a nice way of saying Kim was limping along like an old man.

His absence from important public events since, has sparked fears (or hopes, depending on your viewpoint) that Kim was “either dying or had been deposed”. The regime moved quickly to quash those, saying their “Supreme Leader” had simply been “unwell”. To prove it, they had him wave to the public from a balcony window, showing that he was at least alive, and up and about, if not yet well to be doing his usual public duties.

According to media reports, a North Korean medical team recently visited Germany and Switzerland for consultations on Kim’s health. They would have done better to make a detour to Cape Town to consult sports scientist Prof Tim Noakes.

Marika Sboros - BizNews.com

Marika Sboros, author of this blog

I haven’t seen a report on Kim’s actual BMI (a measure of body fat based on height and weight) and weight, but Noakes would just have to look at him (and his lack of cheekbones) to know that at 1,75m, it’s in the obese range.

Certainly, photos of Kim since he took over the as leader after the death of his father, Kim Jong-il, (known as “Dear Leader”) in 2011, have shown a “rapidly expanding man, at least in terms of his girth”, as one writer put it. Another report quotes North Korea expert Andrei Lankov, who teaches at Seoul’s Kookmin University, saying: “The guy is seriously overweight.” (Lankov goes on to say that’s “not good when you’re talking about a country where so many people are malnourished”, but that’s another issue.)

Science proves it isn’t fat that makes people fat, it’s carbs. So Noakes could explain to Kim that while he is not yet morbidly obese, he is on the way, and it’s because he has been overdoing the carbs. Noakes would be likely to prescribe his  low-carb, high-fat (LCHF, aka “Banting”) diet.

Tim Noakes

Cape Town sports scientist Prof Tim Noakes

Yes, that diet, the one that is causing all the trouble, and being hailed as a “revolution” in South Africa; the one that despite a growing body of scientific evidence to support both efficacy and safety, still has doctors and dietitians frothing at the mouth. (To read the furore about Noakes click here.)

The traditional Korean diet probably has enough protein in it for Kim’s needs. I’m not so sure about its saturated fat content – another reason Noakes diet, or any other good LCHF regimen, would benefit Kim. (The Harcombe diet, by British obesity researcher Zoe Harcombe is another good one. Click to check it out here.)

And if Kim doesn’t yet have full-blown diabetes, as some reports have suggested he has, all that adipose tissue (the medical profession’s euphemism for too much fat) he carries around shows that at the very least he is insulin resistant (IR). Noakes’ diet is specifically for people who are insulin resistant. (Kim can hear Noakes in his own words on his diet, by clicking here.)

The science behind LCHF  shows that along with speedy weight loss, eating enough fat could resolve any other health problems Kim might have. Media reports have suggested that Kim’s “peculiar gait” is from gout, a painful condition both his father, and grandfather, North Korea’s founder Kim Il-sung (known as “Great Leader”) are reported to have had, and that often attacks the toes.

Gout is a form of arthritis, an inflammatory condition sometimes called the “king’s malady”, because it is associated with excessive intake of the good things in life – too much eating and drinking, and too little exercise. Clearly, Kim indulges in all those hedonistic habits.

Yonhap, South Korea’s news agency, has said Kim also has hyperuricemia (excess uric acid in the blood, which would explain the gout), hyperlipidemia (an umbrella term mostly for high cholesterol and triglycerides), and hypertension (high blood pressure), and obesity.

If all that doesn’t augur badly enough, Kim is a smoker, and there’s also the added toll of stress on his health in mind and body.

I’d happily hazard a guess that Kim’s stress levels must constantly reside in the stratosphere. After all, becoming leader at the tender age of just 28, of what the BBC has called as “one of the world’s most secretive societies”, with nuclear ambitions that have “exacerbated its rigidly maintained isolation from the rest of the world”, isn’t exactly a breeze.

The stress of that on its own will be more than enough for “stress hormones”, such as adrenaline and cortisol, to be coursing continually through his bloodstream. That’s even when his country isn’t confronting its neighbour to the south, and fighting (figuratively speaking so far) with the US, and that’s all very bad news for his health.

Of course, stress isn’t always bad. It can even be good. But as Kim is finding, too much of the good things in life can be bad. Excessive stress is shown to suppress the immune system, increase blood pressure and blood sugar levels, decrease libido, contribute to obesity and more.

So when Kim feels under stress, here are five tips to manage it, that include short practices of “mindfulness” (living in the moment), seeing his “ideals”, and “letting go of control”.

*Follow Marika Sboros on Twitter @MarikaSboros

*Subscribe to her weekly Health Matters newsletter by clicking here

My Kitchen Rules chef Pete Evans raises heat over Paleo diet

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“You all have ignited a spark that has been inside me, which is now a raging fire in my belly … the warrior in me is now ready for what’s next,” he wrote on his Facebook page.

“At times in my life I haven’t been focused or very clear of my lifes purpose, however I have a laser focus for what I want to achieve whilst I am on this journey in this body.”

A meat based dish from Pete Evans’ moveable feast. Photo: Supplied

It is the latest in a series of impassioned posts that Evans has fired off in defence of the diet.

Evans has recently graduated as a health coach from the Institute for Integrative Nutrition in New York. 

His impassioned defence of the diet is in contrast with the institute’s bio-individuality theory.

Raw cauliflower and tabouleh by Pete Evans.

Raw cauliflower and tabouleh by Pete Evans. Photo: Supplied

“Our curriculum teaches bio-individuality, or that one person’s food is another person’s poison, because no one diet is right for everyone,” a statement from the institute’s founder Joshua Rosenthal explains on its website. 

“One of the major factors shaping bio-individuality is ancestry. 

“If many generations of your ancestors from Scandinavia were accustomed to eating dairy on a daily basis, it’s natural that your body will be able to assimilate dairy foods.” 

The Department of Health and Ageing's recommended diet.

The Department of Health and Ageing’s recommended diet. Photo: The Department of Health and Ageing

In targeting the DAA and the Heart Foundation, Evans claims that the Paleo diet is the most natural approach to healthy eating. 

“How can this organisation [DAA] publicly attack a way of life that is helping families reclaim their health in the most natural way possible?” he asked. 

The chef has recently written a Paleo cookbook.

He did not miss an opportunity to promote on Facebook one of his latest Paleo recipes, “the chakra salad” with fermented vegetables, nuts, bacon dressing, eggs and avocado. 

“Please share this recipe amongst your tribe as it is so yummy and a great one to mix together,” he said.  

The Heart Foundation claims the Paleo diet is putting heart health at risk.

“We know that the high level of saturated fat in a diet increases the risk of heart disease,” a Heart Foundation spokeswoman said.  

The Heart Foundation and the DAA have historically kept their distance from diets such as Paleo and Atkins.

They claim a balanced diet that mixes all food groups is the best approach to healthy living.

“Any diet excluding whole food groups should raise suspicions,” the DAA’s chief executive officer, Claire Hewat, said a statement in July.

“The idea of cutting out grain-based foods and legumes is not backed by science and eating more meat than is needed by the body certainly has risks, according to the World Health Organisation.” 

A DAA spokeswoman said in a statement on Tuesday: “Outspoken advocates of the Paleo diet have criticised the Dietitians Association of Australia and its members for questioning the merits of the Paleo diet.

“Our members work hard to make a real difference in people’s lives by helping and supporting them to eat better food and be healthier, or working on policy and product development to improve the food supply.

“Our primary concern is that some aspects of the Paleo diet are inconsistent with the Commonwealth Department of Health’s ‘Australian Dietary Guidelines’.

“When it comes to diet and health there is no one-size-fits-all or magic bullet approach. DAA encourages Australians to take a longer-term view to health, based on the recommendations of the Australian Dietary Guidelines.”

The Heart Foundation has been approached for comment.


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Kitchen makeover for your diet: 8 small tweaks to help lose weight

Weight loss

Sep. 27, 2014 at 8:35 AM ET

When it comes to losing weight, you know the drill: Eat less, move more, repeat.

Video: A study from Cornell provides advice on how to make changes to your kitchen in order to improve your health.

It’s a pretty miserable experience for most people, but what if you could also shed pounds by making small changes at home and in other places where you spend your day? That’s the message from Brian Wansink, author of the new book “Slim by Design: Mindless Eating Solutions for Everyday Life.”

“If you look at most dieters, they try to become slim by will power. They try to resist every single thing. The problem of becoming slim by will power is it’s a 24/7 sort of job, it’s never ending,” Wansink, who is also the director of the Cornell University Food and Brand Lab, told TODAY Health.

“What we find is that by simply changing our immediate environment … it ends up leading people to mindlessly eat less.”

It’s that mindless eating that both fascinates and frustrates Wansink, who says most people think they make just 30 or so decisions about food every day, when the number is actually closer to 200. 

And because people are unaware of most their decisions, it’s very easy to let themselves be influenced by the things around them, like the distance of the food from their hands or the size of their bowl.

Here are eight changes to make in your kitchen that could lead you to eat less. Wansink believes making just one change and sticking with it for 25 days could help you lose about 2 pounds a month.

1. De-clutter your kitchen

When participants in one experiment saw snack foods sitting on the counters of a kitchen that was very cluttered and disorganized, they ate about 44 percent more than people who saw the same snacks in a very neat kitchen.

“It’s almost like if your environment is cluttered and out of control, why do I need to be in control myself?” Wansink said.

2. Avoid leaving food out on your counters

Closeup on teenager girl with milk taking chocolate muffin; Shutterstock ID 139199882; PO: today.com

People who had chips or cookies visible on their kitchen counter weighed about 10 pounds more than people with bare counters, according to one study, Wansink said.

Those who openly displayed breakfast cereal weighed about 21 pounds more and those who had soft drinks – even if they were diet sodas – on the counter weighed 25 pounds more.

“Simply the presence of food ends up being a really powerful cue,” Wansink noted. Every time you pass by a cookie jar or a can of soda, you have to ask yourself the question: Do I want one? The answer might be “no” 20 times in a row, but then “no’s” soon start becoming “maybe’s” and the 30th time you look at the snack, the answer will be “yes,” he added.

3. Make the kitchen a less appealing hangout

The more time people spend in the kitchen, the more they tend to eat, Wansink said. So instead of making your kitchen the destination spot in the house, make it a little less “lounge-able”: Get rid of the TV set, have less comfortable chairs and make any other changes to send people on their way instead of inviting them to stay.

4. Put out a fruit bowl

Behold the power of fruit: The average person who has a fruit bowl in their house weighs 8 pounds less than their neighbor next door who doesn’t have one, Wansink said.

“Most of us don’t think on a daily basis, ‘Oh I better get a piece of fruit.’ But if you see it seven times during the day, (you may think), ‘Oh, an apple sounds pretty good,’” he noted.

The presence of a fruit bowl doesn’t seem to make a difference at first, but people do start taking fruit from it after two weeks or so, he added. For it to really be effective, it needs to be within two feet of a place where people sleep or walk, so a high-traffic area like the kitchen is ideal.

5. Wrap tempting left overs in the fridge in aluminum foil

“We’re very unlikely to unwrap things that are in aluminum foil, we’re kind of lazy,” Wansink noted. So hide anything fattening underneath aluminum, but keep covering healthy food in plastic wrap so you can actually see it and be more likely to reach for it.

6. Downsize your plates, glasses and utensils

It’s hard to figure out the right amount of food to serve yourself, so you often end up using cues around you, like the size of your plate. But while 4 ounces of pasta on a 9-inch plate looks like a lot, the same amount on a 12-inch plate looks like an appetizer, so you might just add more pasta.

Simply downsizing your plates or bowls makes a difference: If you switch from a 12-inch to 10-inch plate, you’ll serve about 22 percent less, Wansink said.

If you use a table spoon rather than a “big honking serving spoon,” you’ll serve about 14 percent less, he added.

7. Hide junk food and other tempting snacks

Stash high-calorie snacks in an inconveniently placed cupboard – one that’s way down low or way up high. So instead of having the snacks spread throughout the kitchen, where there are chips or cookies staring at you every time you open a cabinet door, reserve one semi off-limits place that holds the tempting foods.

8. Serve dinner off the stove or counter, instead of having serving dishes on the table

This is a particularly strong tip for men, who tend to be fast eaters, Wansink said. They’ll often finish their dinner and see the rest of the family still eating, so they’ll have seconds from the serving plates on the table – not because they’re hungry, but just to pass the time while everyone is still finishing their meal.

Having serving plates on a back stove or on a counter in the kitchen instead of right in front of diners helps because simply having food at least six feet away makes a typical person eat almost 20 percent less, Wansink noted. They can still have seconds or thirds if they want to, but they’re just a little less likely to get up again and again.

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