Web Analytics

Tag-Archive for » help me lose weight «

Doctor: You get fit in the gym, but you lose weight in the kitchen

x

Embed

x

Share

CLOSE

Reporter Arielle Hines asks for readers to share tips about healthy eating.
Wochit

WAUSAU – A Wausau doctor says sugar, not saturated fat, is one of the main reasons two-thirds of adults in the U.S. are overweight or obese. 

Dr. Timothy Logemann is the medical director of Aspirus Ideal Weight Solution. Patients in the program learn to eat healthier, including by eating food provided by the program, while being medically supervised. The program has treated about 2,200 people in the past five years, all of whom are adults.  Some participants want to lose 30 pounds for a high school reunion, Logemann said, and some have lost 200 pounds.

RELATED: I tried to give up junk food and failed. Any tips?

RELATED: Nutrition expert: You don’t have to give up everything

Logemann spoke about his program and his thoughts on the obesity epidemic. The answers below have been edited for length and clarity. 

What made you want to treat obese patients? 

I like treating people in the prime of life when we can make a difference. This is a disease that’s striking people in their 30s, 40s and 50s. You can make a lifetime of a difference if you help them then. 

In medicine, we are taught to treat the primary problem. If someone has a bad appendix, you don’t give the patient pain medicine: you take it out. For obesity, we were treating their diabetes and high blood pressure, but we were not treating the primary problem. 

If we can get people to follow our program or a similar program, we give them less medicine, not more. And when they lose weight, they feel better. When patients are obese, their life is just tough.  It’s hard to treat, but when you are successful, it’s pretty rewarding. 

How is your program different than other programs? 

In our program, you eat a lot of your own food. You eat a lot of green vegetables, low-carb vegetables and protein. We really strike out carbohydrates, because they cause your insulin levels (a hormone that regulates blood-sugar levels) to come down. When your insulin levels are high, you can’t lose weight. 

The key to obesity is sugar. So you have to learn to eat differently. You have to learn to get your low-starch vegetables and your protein. (In a lot of commercial plans,) you don’t really begin to understand what causes the problem. You just eat their spaghetti instead of your spaghetti. But you don’t realize you shouldn’t eat spaghetti. 

Why are so many people obese? 

Most people think the current obesity epidemic is brought on the change of dietary patterns, and the most common theme is probably sugar. When I was a kid, we had soda once a week. Now people have three sodas a day. Many people’s main vegetable are french fries, which have no nutritional value. 

It’s not saturated fat. That was a myth from the ’90s. (The cause) is sugar, carbohydrates and processed foods. 

What are the biggest obstacles people have to overcome when they are trying to lose weight?

You have to get people to learn to realize why they pick their foods. Why am I eating these cookies?  Am I hungry or is everyone else eating a cookie, so I want to have a cookie?  You have to think about why you are doing what you are doing. The culture in this country is obesogenic (causing obesity).  

I do think, too, there are a lot of bad myths out there. For example, exercise is not a weight loss tool. You get fit in the gym, but you lose weight in the kitchen. 

People always look at us like we have three eyes when we say we don’t really care about exercise. To lose weight, you need to change your diet. Exercise is a good tool to maintain weight loss and we encourage exercise. But this idea if you can’t exercise, you can’t lose weight is bad.

Arielle Hines: [email protected] or 715-845-0658; on [email protected]

Learn more about Aspirus Ideal Weight Solution

To find out more about the program, visit http://bit.ly/2siFYGo or call 715-847-2380.  

Custom Search

Michigan’s Khalid Hill, Michael Onwenu ‘making strides’ to lose weight

x

Embed

x

Share

CLOSE

Michigan coach Jim Harbaugh fielded questions during some down time at the Michigan elite camp on June 23, 2017, in Ann Arbor. Video by Mark Snyder/DFP

In April, Michigan coach Jim Harbaugh spoke to Detroit coaches about fullback Khalid Hill and offensive guard Michael Onwenu needing to lose weight.

Two months later, both players moving in the right direction.

“They’re making strides,” Harbaugh said Friday after the U-M elite high school camp.

“They’re coming along. Not yet (where Harbaugh wants). Getting there though. But that’s the process. As a coach, you’d like to have them a little bit faster. They understand now that things have amped up and there’s heat out here and these workouts are more strenuous, just how important it is for them to be in great shape.

“If you’re not in great shape, no matter how courageous you are as an athlete. … It makes cowards of us all when you’re fatigued and out of shape. … That reality’s getting in there.”

Related:

The April comments cut right to the two players and what they need to accomplish.

“There’s no question (Hill’s) talent right now, his ability to catch the ball out of the backfield, block, he is a complete package as a fullback,” Harbaugh said at the time. “I don’t know where he’s eating though. He’s finding somewhere else to eat other than our cafeteria because he keeps gaining weight.”

Though Harbaugh didn’t list a figure for Hill, who was listed at 263 pounds on last season’s roster, offensive coordinator Tim Drevno said in April that Onwenu was 372 pounds. Onwenu, expected to challenge for a starting guard position, was listed at 350 pounds on last year’s roster.

Harbaugh did not offer updated figures Friday.

21 day rule: Harbaugh has a pretty good idea what his incoming freshmen football players will be experiencing the next few weeks.

Adjusting to college academics and football workouts are the obvious challenges. Getting comfortable with living on their own is another entirely.

“The process really begins being together on a daily, weekly, monthly, yearly basis,” Harbaugh said Friday. “And also to start the process of this being their home. I’ve always felt that it takes 21 days to be acclimated to a new home. So in many cases, it started today. Take 21 days, circle that on the calendar three weeks out and that’s when they should feel this is their new home.”


Eating At The Exact Same Time Every Day Can Help You Lose Weight

If you aren’t one for routine, you may want to rethink your day-to-day approach — especially if you’re prone to eating late dinners after a busy work day or skipping breakfast when you’re running late. According to a new study, an erratic eating schedule could be totally messing with your health. In fact, irregular meals can lead to obesity, high blood pressure, and type 2 diabetes.

Two papers published in the Proceedings of the Nutrition Society found that adults who consume meals at the same time every day were less obese and had better cholesterol and insulin levels, even though they consumed more calories over all. Essentially, when you eat is just as important as what you eat. This research comes from a new category of health and nutrition called chrononutrition, which focuses on the link between your metabolism and circadian rhythms, Health.com reports.

“Eating inconsistently may affect our internal body clock,” study author Gerda Pot, PhD (who’s also a visiting lecturer in the Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences Division at King’s College London) told the health publication. That’s because your metabolic process — including appetite, digestion, and the rate your body processes fat, sugar, and cholesterol — follows a pattern that repeats every 24 hours. Once you disrupt that process by eating at random times every day, you’re at risk for weight gain and other health risks.

If you want to implement a timely tactic, try setting a reminder or alarm on our phone, meal-planning and prepping on the weekends, making the next day’s breakfast and lunch the night before, and setting up your coffee maker ahead of time.

Combine this with mindful eating — when you cut out distractions and completely savor your food — could double your success rate of dropping a few pounds, maintaining your weight, or just feeling healthier overall.

Follow Delish on Instagram.

Custom Search

This UFC Fighter Lost 36 Pounds Using This Technique—Here’s Why You Shouldn’t Do It

In all my years competing, I’ve never missed weight. And when I stepped off the scale, I immediately understood the level of pain and torture I was about to endure. Over the years I’ve become familiar with how my body responds when losing weight. Eating healthy food, in the correct portions, I lose three pounds per week on average. Since I was three weeks out, that would amount to a grand weight-loss total of nine pounds. Clearly, I needed to do something else if I wanted to lose another 27.

At the time, I didn’t understand how eating certain foods can enhance one’s metabolism. So, I kicked off my weight-cut by making a tremendous mistake. I began my short training camp with a two-day fast. Despite two workouts a day consisting of grappling, sparring, and weight training, plus an extra run at night, I ate nothing. Two gallons of water was the only item on my menu.

After two days, I was down four pounds, but it wasn’t long before my body began cannibalizing itself by sacrificing valuable muscle tissue. Muscle is not only important in a fight, it’s also metabolically active, fat-burning tissue. The more muscle you have, the more calories you burn. With the amount of weight I had to lose in such a short period of time, my body had no choice but to also use muscle tissue for energy. That’s not ideal for anyone trying to lose weight—and certainly not good for me, less than 3 weeks out from a cage fight.

Related Video:

Another harmful, but not widely known side effect of crash diets is the negative impact they can have on one’s sleep. Sleeping when you’re hungry is very difficult. Poor sleep is linked to many issues, from mental health problems and decreased metabolism to an increased risk of heart disease and diabetes. Since hunger was now my omnipresent reality, the quality of my sleep was also compromised.

By the third day of training camp, I was pushing myself to the extreme. Overtraining, lack of sleep, and extreme calorie deprivation increased my risk of illness and injury, which meant I was risking my ability to even show up for the fight. My nights were spent staring at the ceiling with my stomach growling as I visualized my upcoming match over and over in my mind, only taking a break to obsess over the buffet of food I would devour it was over. These thoughts consumed me.

I arrived in Las Vegas on a Tuesday, three days before weigh-ins. When you fight for the UFC, the first thing you do during fight week is check in with UFC staff and step on their official scale. When I did it, the scale read 202 pounds—and I felt like I was dying. I still had seventeen pounds to go.

“I had no other choice but to endure the suffering.”

Chael Sonnen

The only thing I had going in my favor was excellent hydration. I had zero energy, but at least the cells in my body were full of water. That meant there was a lot of potential weight I could dump. But dehydration is risky business. You can live for weeks without food, but only days without water. Exposure to heat and exercise significantly increases the risk of something going wrong. Unfortunately, I would need to utilize both over the next few days as I intentionally drove myself into a state of severe dehydration in a final attempt to rapidly lose the remaining weight.

I used two strategies to eliminate the water: running while wearing a plastic sweat suit that increases your sweat rate, and sitting in a hot sauna. A gallon of water weighs 8.3 pounds. I had seventeen pounds to lose. Somehow, I had to suck two gallons of water out of my body in three days. This was not going to be fun.

After years of practice, I knew that I could lose one pound of water every ten minutes with either technique. But there is a limit to the length of time one can spend overheated, running in plastic, or sitting in a sauna. These were the most dangerous moments of the entire weight-cut, so I had to carefully gauge the length of my weight-cutting sessions and split them up over the final three days to avoid the misfortune of heat stroke and/or an untimely death. And because proper rehydration in between each weight cut session would add more water weight to my body, I had no other choice but to endure the suffering.

Poor sleep continued to be an issue throughout this entire ordeal. At the best of times, I hardly sleep during fight week. But this time around, I was significantly more uncomfortable than usual. And while I rarely sleep at all on the night before weigh-ins, I would have preferred a wink or two this time around, if only to forget for a moment how I felt during those final, awful treadmill runs in the plastic suit or during those suffocating sauna sits. My only salvation was knowing that the end was near.

Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images

By the time I gauged that I had achieved my target weight on the day of the weigh-in, I needed help to move. Unfortunately for me, it was a very long walk from the hotel’s spa to my own room. Along the way, through the crowded walkways of the MGM, I stopped to take no less than twenty pictures with fans hanging around the lobby hoping to see one of their favorite fighters. Somehow I mustered a smile.

When I finally completed my excruciating shuffle back to my room and stepped on the scale, I was crushed to learn I was still 1.8 pounds over my target weight. I wanted to burst into tears. I failed to account for my increasing level of dehydration and how that would slow my sweat rate. My math of one pound per ten minutes was all wrong. Back downstairs through the mob of fans and into the sauna I went.

What happened between those final sauna sweat sessions and my arrival at the venue for weigh-ins is a blur to me now. But somehow, by the grace of some miracle, I made it.

This UFC Fighter Lost 36 Pounds Using This Technique—Here’s Why You Shouldn’t Do It

In all my years competing, I’ve never missed weight. And when I stepped off the scale, I immediately understood the level of pain and torture I was about to endure. Over the years I’ve become familiar with how my body responds when losing weight. Eating healthy food, in the correct portions, I lose three pounds per week on average. Since I was three weeks out, that would amount to a grand weight-loss total of nine pounds. Clearly, I needed to do something else if I wanted to lose another 27.

At the time, I didn’t understand how eating certain foods can enhance one’s metabolism. So, I kicked off my weight-cut by making a tremendous mistake. I began my short training camp with a two-day fast. Despite two workouts a day consisting of grappling, sparring, and weight training, plus an extra run at night, I ate nothing. Two gallons of water was the only item on my menu.

After two days, I was down four pounds, but it wasn’t long before my body began cannibalizing itself by sacrificing valuable muscle tissue. Muscle is not only important in a fight, it’s also metabolically active, fat-burning tissue. The more muscle you have, the more calories you burn. With the amount of weight I had to lose in such a short period of time, my body had no choice but to also use muscle tissue for energy. That’s not ideal for anyone trying to lose weight—and certainly not good for me, less than 3 weeks out from a cage fight.

Related Video:

Another harmful, but not widely known side effect of crash diets is the negative impact they can have on one’s sleep. Sleeping when you’re hungry is very difficult. Poor sleep is linked to many issues, from mental health problems and decreased metabolism to an increased risk of heart disease and diabetes. Since hunger was now my omnipresent reality, the quality of my sleep was also compromised.

By the third day of training camp, I was pushing myself to the extreme. Overtraining, lack of sleep, and extreme calorie deprivation increased my risk of illness and injury, which meant I was risking my ability to even show up for the fight. My nights were spent staring at the ceiling with my stomach growling as I visualized my upcoming match over and over in my mind, only taking a break to obsess over the buffet of food I would devour it was over. These thoughts consumed me.

I arrived in Las Vegas on a Tuesday, three days before weigh-ins. When you fight for the UFC, the first thing you do during fight week is check in with UFC staff and step on their official scale. When I did it, the scale read 202 pounds—and I felt like I was dying. I still had seventeen pounds to go.

“I had no other choice but to endure the suffering.”

Chael Sonnen

The only thing I had going in my favor was excellent hydration. I had zero energy, but at least the cells in my body were full of water. That meant there was a lot of potential weight I could dump. But dehydration is risky business. You can live for weeks without food, but only days without water. Exposure to heat and exercise significantly increases the risk of something going wrong. Unfortunately, I would need to utilize both over the next few days as I intentionally drove myself into a state of severe dehydration in a final attempt to rapidly lose the remaining weight.

I used two strategies to eliminate the water: running while wearing a plastic sweat suit that increases your sweat rate, and sitting in a hot sauna. A gallon of water weighs 8.3 pounds. I had seventeen pounds to lose. Somehow, I had to suck two gallons of water out of my body in three days. This was not going to be fun.

After years of practice, I knew that I could lose one pound of water every ten minutes with either technique. But there is a limit to the length of time one can spend overheated, running in plastic, or sitting in a sauna. These were the most dangerous moments of the entire weight-cut, so I had to carefully gauge the length of my weight-cutting sessions and split them up over the final three days to avoid the misfortune of heat stroke and/or an untimely death. And because proper rehydration in between each weight cut session would add more water weight to my body, I had no other choice but to endure the suffering.

Poor sleep continued to be an issue throughout this entire ordeal. At the best of times, I hardly sleep during fight week. But this time around, I was significantly more uncomfortable than usual. And while I rarely sleep at all on the night before weigh-ins, I would have preferred a wink or two this time around, if only to forget for a moment how I felt during those final, awful treadmill runs in the plastic suit or during those suffocating sauna sits. My only salvation was knowing that the end was near.

Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images

By the time I gauged that I had achieved my target weight on the day of the weigh-in, I needed help to move. Unfortunately for me, it was a very long walk from the hotel’s spa to my own room. Along the way, through the crowded walkways of the MGM, I stopped to take no less than twenty pictures with fans hanging around the lobby hoping to see one of their favorite fighters. Somehow I mustered a smile.

When I finally completed my excruciating shuffle back to my room and stepped on the scale, I was crushed to learn I was still 1.8 pounds over my target weight. I wanted to burst into tears. I failed to account for my increasing level of dehydration and how that would slow my sweat rate. My math of one pound per ten minutes was all wrong. Back downstairs through the mob of fans and into the sauna I went.

What happened between those final sauna sweat sessions and my arrival at the venue for weigh-ins is a blur to me now. But somehow, by the grace of some miracle, I made it.

Can Charles Barkley lose weight without eating salads?


NASHVILLE, TN – JUNE 05: Basketball player Charles Barkley attends the Stanley Cup Finals Game 4 Nashville Predators Vs. Pittsburgh Penguins at Bridgestone Arena at Bridgestone Arena on June 5, 2017 in Nashville, Tennessee. (Photo by Terry Wyatt/Getty Images)

Early this month, former NBA star Charles Barkley said he was heading to a “fat farm” in San Antonio, Texas to lose weight.

The star of Atlanta-based TNT’s Inside the NBA, said he has gotten lazy since his days on the court.

“Listen, I am embarrassed about how fat I have become,” said Barkley on television during the NBA Finals. “I’ve become lazy. Number one, I’m not healthy. I’m not healthy. Y’all not going to see me. I’ve got to come back for the [NBA] awards show. But I’m taking the next six weeks to get my fat ass in shape.”

WATCH: Shaq and Charles Barkley flame each other in hilarious video clip

Barkley, 54, retired from the NBA in 2000.

He said he plans to eat healthy, work out and cut back on drinking in order to lose weight.

But we here at the AJC know how hard that is going to be for him.

Back in the mid-2000s, when Taurus Restaurant was still serving up American cuisine in Brookwood Village Shopping Center, me and a fellow AJC-er encountered Barkley and a friend while dining at the bar.

Barkley took one look at my friend and her meal then turned and said to his friend, “I don’t trust people who eat salads.”

Hmm. Okay. We’re both betting he has gotten over that personality quirk.

In 2011, Barkley became a celebrity spokesperson for Weight Watchers and he reportedly lost 27 pounds in 10 weeks. Back then he weighed 350 pounds.

He hasn’t said what his current weight is or how much he plans to lose at the fat farm, but whatever he does, it is likely going to involve eating salad.




Facebook Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com