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Young Woman Dies After DNP Diet Pills Bought Online:

Burned Her From Within

Young Woman Dies After DNP Diet Pills Bought Online:


Diet pills may seem harmless, but a recent tragedy has shown how dangerous they really can be.

A 21-year-old British woman died on April 12 after accidentally overdosing on diet pills she bought online that contained the toxic ingredient dinitrophenol (DNP). Eloise Aimee Parry took eight tablets that contained the drug, her mother, Fiona Parry, said in a statement that she posted online. (Two tablets was a lethal dose.)

Eloise was taken to the hospital, where she “was literally burning up from within,” and her metabolism ran “at an explosive level” as doctors tried to save her, her mother said.

“As the drug kicked in and started to make her metabolism soar, they attempted to cool her down, but they were fighting an uphill battle. … When she stopped breathing, they put her on a ventilator and carried on fighting to save her. When her heart stopped they couldn’t revive her. She had crashed. She had taken so much DNP that the consequences were inevitable. They never stood a chance of saving her.”

Police are investigating the death and are warning people about the dangers of buying diet pills online. “We urge the public to be incredibly careful when purchasing medicine or supplements over the Internet,” Chief Inspector Jennifer Mattinson told the Guardian. “Substances from unregistered websites could put your health at risk, as they could be extremely harmful, out of date, or fake.”

According to reports, more than 60 people worldwide have died from taking DNP, but the ingredient continues to show up in some diet pills.

This industrial chemical has become popular in the murky online worlds of the bodybuilding and eating-disorder communities. It was first used on an industrial scale in French ammunition factories during World War I to make explosives, according to a report in the Guardian. The experience of the factory workers first highlighted its metabolism-speeding effects: They lost weight, sweated excessively, and displayed an elevated body temperature.

These observations led to a 1934 study at Stanford University, which concluded that DNP could stimulate human metabolism by 50 percent, breaking down fat stores to lead to a weight loss of up to 3 pounds per week. Within a year, DNP weight-loss supplements were regular fare at drugstores. But side effects, including cataracts and skin lesions, were reported, along with deaths — one man who overdosed was “literally cooked to death” with a body temperature of 109.9 degrees F. By 1938, DNP had been pulled from the shelves and designated as not fit for human consumption.

Yahoo Health


PBS Investigates Possible Censorship Ben Affleck’s Slavery

PBS is conducting an internal review following revelations that producers of “Finding Your Roots” may have violated the network’s editorial standards after a request by Ben Affleck that the program not reveal he had a slave-owning ancestor.

Meanwhile, Affleck has expressed regret for seeking to have the information omitted from the episode that featured the actor and aired last October.

“We deserve neither credit nor blame for our ancestors and the degree of interest in this story suggests that we are, as a nation, still grappling with the terrible legacy of slavery,” Affleck posted on his Facebook page Tuesday night.

The review by PBS and New York station WNET began Saturday, according to a statement released Tuesday by PBS spokeswoman Anne Bentley.

“We have been moving forward deliberately yet swiftly to conduct this review,” she said.

In his Facebook post, Affleck acknowledges that, initially, “I didn’t want any television show about my family to include a guy who owned slaves. I was embarrassed.”

He says he lobbied Henry Louis Gates, the Harvard scholar who hosts and produces the show, “the same way I lobby directors about what takes of mine I think they should use.”

“It’s important to remember that this isn’t a news program,” Affleck said of “Finding Your Roots,” which traces the ancestry of well-known guests. “You voluntarily provide a great deal of information about your family, making you quite vulnerable.

The assumption is that they will never be dishonest but they will respect your willingness to participate and not look to include things you think would embarrass your family.”

Affleck’s request came to light last week in hacked Sony emails published online by whistleblower site WikiLeaks.

Gates and PBS said then they didn’t censor the slave-owner details. Instead, more interesting ancestors of the actor emerged and Gates chose to highlight them instead.

But in an email exchange between Gates and Sony Pictures co-chairman and chief executive Michael Lynton — part of a trove of hundreds of thousands of emails and documents from last year’s Sony hack published online by WikiLeaks — Gates asks Lynton for advice on how to handle Affleck’s request.

“Here’s my dilemma,” says Gates in one email, dated July 22, 2014 — “confidentially, for the first time, one of our guests has asked us to edit out something about one of his ancestors — the fact that he owned slaves. Now, four or five of our guests this season descend from slave owners, including (prolific documentary filmmaker) Ken Burns. We’ve never had anyone ever try to censor or edit what we found. He’s a megastar. What do we do?”

Lynton replies that it all depends on who knows that the information was in the documentary already.

“I would take it out if no one knows, but if it gets out that you are editing the material based on this kind of sensitivity then it gets tricky. Again, all things being equal I would definitely take it out,” Lynton wrote that same day.

When the segment aired Oct. 14, Gates focused on an Affleck ancestor who was an occultist, a Revolutionary War relative and Affleck’s mother, who was a “freedom rider” in 1964.

On Saturday, PBS said the network did not know of the exchanges between Gates, Sony and Affleck, and wasn’t part of editorial decisions made by Gates and his fellow producers.

Huffington Post


6 Healthy Foods to Help Keep Your Hunger Pangs Away

The worst part about trying to lose weight is feeling hungry. As a nutritionist specializing in weight loss and maintenance, I have experienced firsthand that feeling hungry often leads dieters astray and contributes to them falling off the wagon.

I have never been a fan of deprivation diets — or any diet for that matter. It is more important to develop lifelong habits you can sustain. One such habit is choosing “go to” foods that you enjoy and that also make you feel full. The key to feeling full is not eating large portions, but rather, choosing foods that contain nutrients which aid satiety. Foods high in protein, fiber, and good fats tend to keep your hunger at bay, which is what you want to aim for when trying losing weight.

Here are six nutritious — and delicious — foods that will help keep you feeling full. You won’t even know you are trying to lose weight.

1. Oatmeal

Starting your day with a bowl of oatmeal is a great way to keep from feeling hungry an hour after eating breakfast. Oatmeal contains a mix of both soluble and insoluble fiber which is not only good for your heart, but it also may also keep your hunger pangs away.

Research comparing the effects of oatmeal and corn flakes on feelings of fullness and hunger found that overweight subjects reported feeling more satisfied after consuming oatmeal than corn flakes. And they also ate less at lunch.

Add water, fat-free milk, vanilla-flavored soy milk, or almond milk to your favorite brand of oatmeal and you have a delicious and nutritious breakfast.

2. Greek yogurt

Greek yogurt is a great food to include in your diet. It is high in protein keeping you feeling full and a good source of calcium and vitamin D. It also makes for a great snack, as it is portable. Just one caveat: Stick to flavors that are not loaded with added sugar. My suggestion: Stick to the plain yogurt and add fresh fruit, flax seeds, and a drizzle of honey if necessary.

3. Avocado

Avocados taste great and add zest to a meal. They are also rich in healthy nutrients — including heart-healthy monounsaturated fats, fiber, vitamin E and potassium — while also keeping your hunger at bay. Research from Loma Linda University and sponsored by the Hass Avocado Board found that subjects who consumed one-half of a fresh avocado with lunch felt more satisfied and had less of a desire to eat after the meal.

So the next time you are deciding what to eat for lunch, add some avocado and you won’t be running to the vending machine for a late-afternoon snack.

4. Lentils

Beans and legumes contain a terrific combination of nutrients to help keep you feeling full. They are loaded with soluble fiber and protein. An excellent protein alternative for vegetarians, they are a good source of iron, magnesium, potassium, and folate. These heart-healthy nutrients may also help to reduce blood cholesterol and triglycerides.

I invite you to incorporate lentils into your diet, if you don’t already. You can enjoy lentil soup, lentil pate, or lentil salad. Toss some cooked lentils with some olive oil, chopped red peppers, scallions, and your favorite spices. This salad can be eaten as part of a meal or as a healthy and satisfying snack.

5. Almonds

Need a healthy late-afternoon snack? Grab a handful of almonds. The protein, fiber, and fat in nuts help you feel full longer, so you may actually end up eating less throughout the day. Studies show that including a serving of nuts (approximately a handful) in your diet may actually prevent weight gain and possibly even promote weight loss, as long as you control for total calories. As an added benefit, nut eaters may have a lower incidence of diabetes when compared to those who rarely eat nuts.

6. Quinoa

Quinoa makes for a healthy and satiating addition to a meal. This ancient grain contains an array of vitamins and minerals including iron, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin E as well as protein and fiber, a winning combination to helping you feel full. A 1/2-cup serving of cooked quinoa contains 2.6 grams of fiber and 4.1 grams of protein as compared to 1/2 cup of cooked white rice which contains only 0.3 gram of fiber and 2.2 grams of protein.

And no, quinoa is not fattening. A ½ cup of cooked quinoa contains approximately 100 calories. And next time you can’t decide what to eat for dinner, enjoy a healthy portion of quinoa (around ½ cup-1 cup cooked) with grilled fish or tofu along with your favorite assortment of sautéed vegetables.

Huffington Post


Paris Hilton’s Dog Tinkerbell Dies

Paris Hilton’s beloved Chihuahua Tinkerbell has died.

She shared the news via Instagram on Tuesday. “My heart is broken. I am so sad devastated,” she wrote. “After 14 amazing years together my baby Tinkerbell has passed away of old age. I feel like I’ve lost a member of my family. She was such a special incredible soul. We went through so much together. I can’t believe she’s gone. I will miss her think about her for the rest of my life. I love you Tinky, you are a Legend will never be forgotten.”

The hotel heiress owns many pets, dogs in particular, but Tinkerbell was one of her favorites. In the early 2000s, Paris carried Tinkerbell to ritzy stores, fashion shows, and even on her reality show The Simple Life, helping to inspire the stereotype of L.A. ladies who carry around tiny dogs in handbags.

Her pooch was so iconic that, a few years later when Paris started carrying around other dogs instead of little Tinkerbell, people wondered what had happened to Tink. Handbag designer James Piatt even created a $317 piece inspired by the “discarded pet.” The speculation about the pooch’s whereabouts was so strong that, in October, Hilton felt the need to reassure followers that her former sidekick was still going strong.

“To everyone who keeps asking if Tinkerbell is alive, Here she is, the original queen herself!” she tweeted along with a photo of her furry friend.

Sadly, that’s no longer true. R.I.P. Tinkerbell.

Yahoo 

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